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Ravioli

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BUSINESS
March 18, 1997 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before they said "plumper," they measured the height and length. Before they said "firmer," they measured the force it would take to bite through it. Before they said "redder, richer" and "preferred nearly two to one," they took a poll; more than half the testers voted in their favor. It seemed like a lot of work for an advertising campaign. But these days, with competitors watching your every move, you'd better be prepared to back up those claims. Campbell Soup Co. was ready.
FOOD
June 5, 2003 | By Annette Gooch FOR THE INQUIRER
Ravioli - little pasta pillows filled to plumpness with something savory - are never more pleasurable than when the pasta is freshly made. Dough for ravioli should be more moist than for flat or tubular pasta. Several factors affect the dough's moisture content, including the type of flour used, its age, and the humidity in the kitchen. If dough is too sticky or too dry to roll properly, add no more than 1/2 teaspoon water or 1 tablespoon flour. Moisture also affects how thin the dough can be rolled and, therefore, how many ravioli it yields.
NEWS
October 27, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Between now and Nov. 5, Gilda Passarella's spare moments will be filled making pizzelles. More than 2,500 of them will be needed for the annual ravioli dinner on Nov. 5 at St. Anthony's Church in Waterford where Passarella is a parishioner, and it's her job to make nearly all of the Italian wafers flavored with anise that will be served with ice cream. Luckily for Passarella, she has two pizzelle makers to accomplish the task, which she started on Monday. "It takes me about four hours to make about 700 of them," said Passarella, who also is coordinating the annual event that started 43 years ago as a fund-raiser by the church's women's organization, Our Lady of Mount Carmel.
FOOD
November 12, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
The pumpkin, so often marginalized as a decorative item and excluded from serious cooking, has a true friend in Barbara Gennello. Every fall, she and her husband, Jim, host a party at their Palmyra home that glorifies the gaudy, hard-shelled winter squash and proves that the jack-o'-lantern form is not its highest calling. Cajun-spiced deep-fried turkeys and sweet maple-glazed hams anchor the feast, and virtually every other dish - from appetizer to dessert - incorporates fresh or canned pumpkin.
NEWS
March 27, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Christina Verrelli, a 43-year-old Main Line mom, reshaped an old-fashioned pumpkin pie into an trendy "ravioli" dessert with a salted caramel whipped cream topping to win the 45th Pillsbury Bake-Off and $1 million. "Oh my God, I'm over the moon," she said, still a little shocked, moments after she appeared on The Martha Stewart Show Tuesday morning from the contest in Orlando, Fla. "I'm in surreal land right now," she said in a phone interview. "It doesn't feel quite real yet. " When asked how she would spend the million dollars, Verelli, who lives in Devon with her husband, Louis, and two daughters, 7 and 9, said: "Well, college.
NEWS
November 18, 2001 | By Nedra Lindsey INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was in the early 1970s, and the most notable "Italian" dish in mainstream South Jersey was spaghetti and meatballs. There were few Italian restaurants in the area. And pizza had not yet reached the culinary stature of hamburger and fries. But Joe and Anna Maria Severino opened their French Avenue pasta store in 1971, committed to spreading the gospel of authentic Italian food. "We always saw beautiful pasta shops in Rome," said Anna Maria, 73, who has been married to Joe, 69, for more than four decades.
NEWS
October 20, 1993 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
A recent lunch at the Philadelphia Industrial Corrections Center suggested new vistas in modern penology - prison cuisine as punishment. That's the conclusion based on a sampling of that day's fare - barbecued spare ribs, greens, ravioli in meat sauce, the ever-present white bread and lemonade. Shabby food is one of the reasons the city is privatizing its food service and building a massive food factory. The goal is better quality and reduced cost. Sensitive to the growing non-pork eating population in the prison system, the prison's culinary wizards offered inmates a choice between the ribs and the ravioli.
FOOD
April 11, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, Special to The Inquirer
The Saint James in Ardmore was playing outside its original suburban comfort-food zone one recent night, evidence that owner Michael Schulson (who also owns Sampan, at 13th and Sansom Streets) has been logging more hours at the stove. Dollops of bigeye tuna tartare on warm rice crackers emerged. And slivers of glistening Berkshire pork belly with schmears of root-beer barbecue sauce. But it was the overhauled pasta dishes that hinted at a new day, one in particular - an exquisite baby fava bean and ricotta ravioli, redolent of fresh mint, the pasta rolled elegantly thin and tender, and bathed in butter and parmesan.
NEWS
August 21, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Right up to the time he closed his store near the Italian Market in 2002, Anthony P. Giunta Jr. was still ringing up sales on a 107-year-old hand-cranked brass cash register. He was still selling chittara, wires stretched between two pieces of wood used to cut fresh pasta dough. And at Christmastime, customers still came for handheld pizelle mold, which is used to fashion those Italian cookies the way grandmothers used to. Giunta Bros. at 11th and Christian Streets was a kitchen-equipment store that harked back to its 1915 founding by his father, Anthony Sr. Mr. Giunta, 78, whose ill health forced him to retire and close the store in 2002, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at his home in South Philadelphia.
FOOD
May 24, 1992 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Give the folks at Totaro's credit for being ahead of the pack in believing that Conshohocken could be a destination for sophisticated diners. And while you're at it, give the community itself a pat on the back for its support of this tiny, upscale Italian restaurant in one of its working-class neighborhoods. Five years ago - when the area's impressive downtown restoration was still on the drawing boards - Totaro's went from being a neighborhood bar to a full- fledged restaurant with wine list, linens, candles and flowers.
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FOOD
April 11, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, Special to The Inquirer
The Saint James in Ardmore was playing outside its original suburban comfort-food zone one recent night, evidence that owner Michael Schulson (who also owns Sampan, at 13th and Sansom Streets) has been logging more hours at the stove. Dollops of bigeye tuna tartare on warm rice crackers emerged. And slivers of glistening Berkshire pork belly with schmears of root-beer barbecue sauce. But it was the overhauled pasta dishes that hinted at a new day, one in particular - an exquisite baby fava bean and ricotta ravioli, redolent of fresh mint, the pasta rolled elegantly thin and tender, and bathed in butter and parmesan.
NEWS
March 27, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Christina Verrelli, a 43-year-old Main Line mom, reshaped an old-fashioned pumpkin pie into an trendy "ravioli" dessert with a salted caramel whipped cream topping to win the 45th Pillsbury Bake-Off and $1 million. "Oh my God, I'm over the moon," she said, still a little shocked, moments after she appeared on The Martha Stewart Show Tuesday morning from the contest in Orlando, Fla. "I'm in surreal land right now," she said in a phone interview. "It doesn't feel quite real yet. " When asked how she would spend the million dollars, Verelli, who lives in Devon with her husband, Louis, and two daughters, 7 and 9, said: "Well, college.
NEWS
August 21, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Right up to the time he closed his store near the Italian Market in 2002, Anthony P. Giunta Jr. was still ringing up sales on a 107-year-old hand-cranked brass cash register. He was still selling chittara, wires stretched between two pieces of wood used to cut fresh pasta dough. And at Christmastime, customers still came for handheld pizelle mold, which is used to fashion those Italian cookies the way grandmothers used to. Giunta Bros. at 11th and Christian Streets was a kitchen-equipment store that harked back to its 1915 founding by his father, Anthony Sr. Mr. Giunta, 78, whose ill health forced him to retire and close the store in 2002, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at his home in South Philadelphia.
FOOD
July 10, 2008
Amid the recent fervor for artisan cheesemaking, mild-mannered ricotta has largely been left behind in the firm embrace of big industry's plastic tubs. In a little storefront on East Passyunk Avenue, however, Philip Mancuso remains a notable holdout: the last of South Philly's masters of handmade ricotta. The Italian matrons who came to buy fresh curds for their ravioli and cheesecakes since Mancuso's father, Lucio, founded this cozy storefront in 1940, are fewer and far between. But Mancuso still makes it fresh weekly, storing tall clouds of the cheese in a glass refrigerator behind his counter.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2008 | By BECKY BATCHA, batchab@phillynews.com 215-854-5757
How delicious are Teresa DeSanctis' ravioli? Let's just say that Jersey Shore restaurants often don't bother to make their own. If you're dining out in Cape May County these days and you're served an unusually supple, unusually large square of pasta stuffed with cheese, spinach, meat or lobster, chances are it came from the kitchens of the Ravioli House, Di-Sanctis' restaurant and takeout shop on East Bennett Avenue in Wildwood. The wholesale arm of DeSanctis' business supplies about 50 restaurants in the Wildwoods and beyond, including upper-crusty shore towns like Avalon, Cape May and Stone Harbor.
NEWS
April 13, 2008
Eating at Ristorante Fieni's is like eating at home - probably because it is a home, complete with a fireplace in one dining room. The converted rancher opened 13 years ago as a cozy 60-seat restaurant down the street from the former Echelon Mall (now Voorhees Town Center). It has consistently served sophisticated Italian fare ever since. A friend recently invited the Discreet Diner for lunch at Fieni's, and we had fun rediscovering this South Jersey favorite, owned by Lucio and Angela Fieni.
NEWS
December 2, 2007
Can gooey lasagna at a chain restaurant ever be as satisfying as Mark Vetri's ragoƻt of wild boar? Having enjoyed both, I can answer affirmatively. You see, when the layered skyscraper can stop a Friday-tired 11-year-old from tormenting his brother, comparisons to fine dining become irrelevant. You thank your stars that chain-eating has progressed from the Denny's of your youth to the Carrabba's of your children's. We ended up at the Maple Shade eatery after a fatigued cell-phone exchange familiar to most families: "Do you feel like cooking?"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
As so often happens, you outgrow the family home. And so it was with the longstanding South Philly BYOB Ristorante Tre Scalini. So, Chef Franca DiRenzo, her daughter Francesca Kauffman and son-in-law Michael left the comfortable rowhouse and moved into the "McMansion" in the up-and-coming Passyunk block just off Broad Street. I have to admit, the '60s-style stone fireplace in the old house that other reviewers always panned held a certain endearing Brady Family nostalgia for me. But, it was time to move on and even the Bradys grew up. It's been a little more than three months since the boxes were unpacked and the doors opened.
NEWS
November 30, 2003 | By Sara Isadora Mancuso FOR THE INQUIRER
The shoe-box-size lockers throughout Arpeggio puzzled me as I scanned the dining room during dinner. One of the BYO's owners later told me that there's a waiting list for the cubbies, a gift for the restaurant's regulars who want to keep their wine in-house. But customers aren't heading to this bustling, suburban-trendy restaurant for its storage facilities. They're likely going for Arpeggio's Italian and Middle Eastern dishes, examples of two cultures mixing successfully on one menu.
NEWS
July 20, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Stottsville Inn typifies many old landmarks: It has had a string of owners, it has seen good times and bad, and it sits hard to the road, a massive structure that eventually can't be missed but initially might be hard to find. And, oh yes, did I mention the resident ghost? Located in the far reaches of western Chester County, the Stottsville Inn is named for the blip of a village surrounded by open countryside. The peaceful setting and beautifully restored, circa-1858 inn are two good reasons to visit the restaurant.
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