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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012
OUR CITY sits only about 60 miles from the Atlantic Ocean, even closer to the Delaware Bay, and our river port is one of the busiest on the East Coast. While you wouldn't exactly call Philadelphia "maritime" (as one might call Baltimore), the sea certainly isn't a foreign concept. Yet, when it comes to dining, seafood is so often a struggle in this city. Why aren't there more, and better, seafood places here in Philadelphia, I often wonder? Many others seem to feel the same way, if I judge by how often I'm asked to recommend "a really good seafood place.
FOOD
February 27, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
They already took the market out of Fishmarket. Neil Stein's bold experiment to sell fish retail in the front of his new restaurant, bringing the seafood riches of Striped Bass to the 18th Street masses, lasted all of . . . um . . . six weeks. The raw bar with weird clip-on trays that replaced it should be moved soon, too. That long snowdrift, stuffed with more than a dozen varieties of oysters, giant stone crab pincers and jumbo jumbo shrimp, is being plowed into the bar in the back room, where it began.
FOOD
November 15, 2007 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Hard to believe that Dave Magrogan has been in the restaurant business only 41/2 years. Magrogan, a chiropractor by training, built six Kildare's pubs. He branched out last year with a different concept, Doc Magrogan's Oyster House in downtown West Chester. His latest project - for which he ventured out into the hinterlands (near Chester County's border with Lancaster, at Routes 322 and 10) - is Grady David's (4690 Horseshoe Pike, Honey Brook, 610-273-9000). Grady David's, named after his baby son, is a spacious operation (main dining room, bar, raw bar, downstairs game room, lounge)
NEWS
August 26, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
It's a tough town. Before Coquette, the big-windowed bistro and raw bar at the corner of Fifth and Bainbridge, opened last month, a gadfly named Alec posting on eGullet, the Internet forum, fired this dart across its bow: "I just saw the menu for Coquette . . . and I already dislike the place. " That Coquette hadn't served its first Cape May Salt or grilled sardine didn't seem to matter. The writer had trouble with the menu's mix of French and English, its use of "natural jus" one place and "housemade steak sauce" another, and the fact that it probably wasn't going to be as good as the recently departed Pif. Well, well.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | by Beth D'Addonos, For the Daily News
Some fathers really have vision. When developer Fred Tocco bought a tract of farmland on Evesham Road in Cherry Hill 18 years ago, he thought the 19th century farmhouse that came with the deal had potential. His sons Bob and Greg didn't have much to say about the matter at the time - they were just kids. But fast-forward 15 years or so, and Bob, now a developer like his dad, and Greg, an attorney, were wishing they didn't have to go into Philly every time they wanted to enjoy sophisticated surroundings, great food and a happening scene.
NEWS
October 19, 1993 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Greetings, Toronto Blue Jays fans. We're presuming the Series isn't the only entertainment you'll take in while you're here. You'll also want to find a spot for toasting and sampling the cuisine that made John Kruk what he is today. GETTING AROUND SEPTA's Broad Street Subway, which runs north-south beneath Broad Street, is the most efficient route to Veterans Stadium at Pattison Avenue, the last southbound stop. Fares are $1.50 each way, payable by exact change or token.
FOOD
October 22, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Personally, I don't mind - and in fact, rather enjoy - dining in an uncrowded restaurant. So when dinner partners and I arrived at the new Charles' Philadelphia restaurant on the site of the old Wildflowers and found the place almost empty on two occasions, I wasn't bothered, particularly because the food at both meals didn't reflect the despair that overcomes some kitchens when a new business fails to take off immediately. But Charles' paucity of customers may have remedied itself by now because the restaurant's long-awaited liquor license arrived just after my last visit, and credit-card privileges followed by a few days.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | By Sam Gugino, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Babe's Steakhouse has come to Aramingo Avenue, and Port Richmond will never be the same. How many restaurants do you know where the customers stop the owner and thank him? After making a fortune putting up shopping centers in New Jersey, Florida and Pennsylvania (including one where the restaurant is located), Babe Kozlowski decided to open the kind of restaurant he dreamed of, right in his old neighborhood. "People thought I was crazy," said Babe (everyone calls him Babe)
FOOD
November 8, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
The neighborhood-friendly Bainbridge Street Barrel House has lit up the corner of Sixth and Bainbridge Streets (267-324-3553), next door to Bistrot La Minette and across from Beau Monde. For the crowd in this pocket where Queen Village meets Bella Vista, it should be a welcome addition. It's open at 8 a.m. for breakfast and brunch, and offers daily lunch and dinner/late night service. The contemporary dining room - where cold and heat are blocked by a revolving door - has a roomy bar with two 50-inch TVs and an open kitchen, where you can watch executive chef Eric Paraskevas (ex-Happy Rooster, Continental, Lolita, Slate, and Terra)
FOOD
June 11, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
An air of homecoming attended the reopening of the sorely missed Sansom Street Oyster House one evening last week, its name, in keeping with its sleeker lines, now collapsed to Oyster House, period. That it resides on Sansom Street apparently is considered superfluous information for a place that has been a fixture there, east of 16th, for more than 30 years. By 4:55 p.m., Sam Mink, at 33 the latest family member to run the haunt, had final words for the servers: Please, he implored, keep refilling the big goblets of oyster crackers; and mind the horseradish pots, too. No spotlights swept the wet sky. No evidence of an event planner was in sight.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
November 8, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
The neighborhood-friendly Bainbridge Street Barrel House has lit up the corner of Sixth and Bainbridge Streets (267-324-3553), next door to Bistrot La Minette and across from Beau Monde. For the crowd in this pocket where Queen Village meets Bella Vista, it should be a welcome addition. It's open at 8 a.m. for breakfast and brunch, and offers daily lunch and dinner/late night service. The contemporary dining room - where cold and heat are blocked by a revolving door - has a roomy bar with two 50-inch TVs and an open kitchen, where you can watch executive chef Eric Paraskevas (ex-Happy Rooster, Continental, Lolita, Slate, and Terra)
FOOD
September 20, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Catelli Ristorante enjoyed an almost-17-year run in the Main Street Complex in Voorhees before the swish Italian destination closed in July 2011. Times had changed. Owners Jan Talamo, Linda Rosanio, and chef Lou Imbesi went back to the drawing board and came up with Catelli Duo , an industrial-chic osteria/wine bar tucked into Voorhees Town Center (12101 Town Center Blvd., 856-751-6069). The menu allows dining at a variety of price points. Imbesi says patrons will be asked if they want "social" (smaller)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012
OUR CITY sits only about 60 miles from the Atlantic Ocean, even closer to the Delaware Bay, and our river port is one of the busiest on the East Coast. While you wouldn't exactly call Philadelphia "maritime" (as one might call Baltimore), the sea certainly isn't a foreign concept. Yet, when it comes to dining, seafood is so often a struggle in this city. Why aren't there more, and better, seafood places here in Philadelphia, I often wonder? Many others seem to feel the same way, if I judge by how often I'm asked to recommend "a really good seafood place.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2009 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
IENTERED the Oyster House with trepidation. It has been more than a year since its closing and return to its original owners. Certainly, it had seen better days before the disappointing ownership of Cary Neff and the subsequent shuttering. Still, I had nostalgia for the good parts - the happy hour oysters and clams were priced so a good dozen could slide down your gullet with barely a dent in your wallet. Despite all its faults, the old place felt very Philly. It was heartening to know that Sam Mink, the third generation of the original Mink family owners, was taking over.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2009 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
I ENTERED the Oyster House with trepidation. It has been more than a year since its closing and return to its original owners. Certainly, it had seen better days before the disappointing ownership of Cary Neff and the subsequent shuttering. Still, I had nostalgia for the good parts - the happy hour oysters and clams were priced so a good dozen could slide down your gullet with barely a dent in your wallet. Despite all its faults, the old place felt very Philly. It was heartening to know that Sam Mink, the third generation of the original Mink family owners, was taking over.
FOOD
June 11, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
An air of homecoming attended the reopening of the sorely missed Sansom Street Oyster House one evening last week, its name, in keeping with its sleeker lines, now collapsed to Oyster House, period. That it resides on Sansom Street apparently is considered superfluous information for a place that has been a fixture there, east of 16th, for more than 30 years. By 4:55 p.m., Sam Mink, at 33 the latest family member to run the haunt, had final words for the servers: Please, he implored, keep refilling the big goblets of oyster crackers; and mind the horseradish pots, too. No spotlights swept the wet sky. No evidence of an event planner was in sight.
FOOD
November 15, 2007 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Hard to believe that Dave Magrogan has been in the restaurant business only 41/2 years. Magrogan, a chiropractor by training, built six Kildare's pubs. He branched out last year with a different concept, Doc Magrogan's Oyster House in downtown West Chester. His latest project - for which he ventured out into the hinterlands (near Chester County's border with Lancaster, at Routes 322 and 10) - is Grady David's (4690 Horseshoe Pike, Honey Brook, 610-273-9000). Grady David's, named after his baby son, is a spacious operation (main dining room, bar, raw bar, downstairs game room, lounge)
NEWS
August 26, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
It's a tough town. Before Coquette, the big-windowed bistro and raw bar at the corner of Fifth and Bainbridge, opened last month, a gadfly named Alec posting on eGullet, the Internet forum, fired this dart across its bow: "I just saw the menu for Coquette . . . and I already dislike the place. " That Coquette hadn't served its first Cape May Salt or grilled sardine didn't seem to matter. The writer had trouble with the menu's mix of French and English, its use of "natural jus" one place and "housemade steak sauce" another, and the fact that it probably wasn't going to be as good as the recently departed Pif. Well, well.
FOOD
February 27, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
They already took the market out of Fishmarket. Neil Stein's bold experiment to sell fish retail in the front of his new restaurant, bringing the seafood riches of Striped Bass to the 18th Street masses, lasted all of . . . um . . . six weeks. The raw bar with weird clip-on trays that replaced it should be moved soon, too. That long snowdrift, stuffed with more than a dozen varieties of oysters, giant stone crab pincers and jumbo jumbo shrimp, is being plowed into the bar in the back room, where it began.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | by Beth D'Addonos, For the Daily News
Some fathers really have vision. When developer Fred Tocco bought a tract of farmland on Evesham Road in Cherry Hill 18 years ago, he thought the 19th century farmhouse that came with the deal had potential. His sons Bob and Greg didn't have much to say about the matter at the time - they were just kids. But fast-forward 15 years or so, and Bob, now a developer like his dad, and Greg, an attorney, were wishing they didn't have to go into Philly every time they wanted to enjoy sophisticated surroundings, great food and a happening scene.
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