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Raw Materials

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BUSINESS
October 21, 1994 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Manufacturing in the region surged in the last month, but so did prices for raw materials, a survey released yesterday by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia shows. The survey of 150 manufacturers found that 40.9 percent of the manufacturers reported an increase this month, compared with 7.7 percent who reported a decrease. The difference - 33.2 percent - is up sharply from 14.8 percent last month. "I think this is a sign that we're well on the road to recovery," said Richard Stein, chief economist at CoreStates in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2005 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drug-packaging-manufacturer West Pharmaceutical Services Inc. reported quarterly earnings yesterday below Wall Street expectations, due to slower sales and higher raw-material and energy costs after the recent hurricanes. After an initial plunge of 32 percent, shares recovered to close down $3.97, or 14.5 percent, to $23.43. It was the second-worst-performing stock on the New York Stock Exchange yesterday, ahead of Valassis Communications Inc. Third-quarter net income was $7.8 million, or 24 cents a share, up from $4.3 million, or 14 cents a share a year earlier.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1996 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you like your Tastykakes, you've probably scarfed down a package of Butterscotch Krimpets, the confectioner's best-selling treat. For the 320-calorie sugar rush you got, thank Conrail. One of its 53,000 freight cars carried the sugar to Tastykakes' bakers. And it was Conrail - or one of the two other giant railroads between the Mississippi River and the Atlantic Ocean, CSX and Norfolk Southern - that shipped the auto parts that were turned into your car, and the raw chemicals that became your wind- and weather-proof winter jacket.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | By Molly Peterson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
U.S. Steel's hot-end mill here has been closed for three years, but the port that once supplied it is finally bustling again - with a different kind of cargo. It's exporting Pennsylvania-made homes to Russia. And it's importing such materials as steel, plywood and pressboard from several countries, including England, Russia, Greece and Brazil. The port on the Delaware River has been handling imports and exports since July, when Atlantic Marine Terminals Inc., which is leasing the 12.5-acre spot from USX Corp.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Hatfield Township Zoning Hearing Board has granted a special exception to Penn Color Inc. to permit construction of six storage silos on the company's property at Richmond and Bergey Roads. At a hearing Thursday night, the board voted unanimously to allow Penn Color to build the silos as long as all applicable fire safety and building codes are met. The company needed the special exception to allow the silos to exceed the township's height limit of 65 feet. Edgar Putman, chairman and chief operating officer of Penn Color, said he expected construction of the 12-foot-by-70-foot silos to begin "as soon as possible.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | By Andrew Metz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Although it was turned away from Bristol Township less than a year ago, Miles Inc., one of the world's largest chemical and health-care product companies, may begin setting up shop in Falls as soon as next month. Miles, a Pittsburgh-based company that next month will change its name to Bayer Corp., was determined to build a chemical warehouse in Lower Bucks County. On March 2, the company received preliminary approval for the project from the Falls Township supervisors. The project may come up for final approval at the board's meeting Thursday.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2011 | By Paul Schweizer, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a stellar March, manufacturing activity in the Philadelphia area slowed sharply this month, and the outlook for the next six months dimmed, a survey released Thursday showed. "Nearly all of the survey's broadest indicators remained positive but fell from their readings in the previous month," the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia said in its monthly Business Outlook survey. Some economists and Fed officials nationally have warned of the danger of inflation as the U.S. economy improves, and the Philadelphia Fed's report cautioned that price increases paid by manufacturers in the region for raw materials "continue to be widespread, and a significant percentage of firms reported increases in prices for their own manufactured goods.
NEWS
October 21, 2001 | By Lauren Mayk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Acme Flag Pole Co. has seen wars before. The flagpole outside the Lingo family business is left over from one. During World War II, Acme was among the businesses prohibited from making nonessential metal products because the government needed raw materials for the war effort. But when President Franklin D. Roosevelt died, workers scrounged the factory for pieces of pipe and constructed a pole to display the flag at half-staff. The pole is still standing outside the factory, where employees and the Lingos are now scrambling to fill orders for new wartime flagpoles.
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Ashraf Sweilam, Associated Press
EL-ARISH, Egypt - Thousands of tons of building materials such as cement and steel began crossing into the Gaza Strip on Saturday, Egyptian and Palestinian officials said, temporarily easing a five-year-old blockade on the coastal territory. An Egyptian security official said the shipment was made in consultation with Israeli officials, who were in Cairo on Thursday to discuss security in the Sinai Peninsula and the Egyptian-brokered cease-fire agreed upon by Gaza's Hamas rulers and Israel last month.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
People joke about nosy dinner guests snooping through bathroom medicine cabinets. Not Skip Rosskam, 67, chief operating officer at David Michael & Co., the Northeast Philadelphia food flavors and product development company. If he's a dinner guest, he has an entirely different goal. Question: What is it? Answer: I'd be sneaking in the kitchen, and I'd be looking in your refrigerator, and I'd be looking in the spice cabinet. Q: What are you actually looking for? A: I'm looking for brands, trends.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Joe Ancona built his first ship 60 years ago, after a memorable Thanksgiving dinner in South Philly. "I was about 13 or 14, breaking walnuts, and they were breaking into perfect halves," the Gloucester Township resident recalls. "I got this [idea] they'd make perfect ships. So I gave it a try. And I've been doing it ever since. " A fleet of exquisite little vessels whose hulls Ancona makes from the shells of walnuts, pecans, or pistachios merrily sails - in glass condiment jars - on the shelves of what he calls the "boat room.
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Ashraf Sweilam, Associated Press
EL-ARISH, Egypt - Thousands of tons of building materials such as cement and steel began crossing into the Gaza Strip on Saturday, Egyptian and Palestinian officials said, temporarily easing a five-year-old blockade on the coastal territory. An Egyptian security official said the shipment was made in consultation with Israeli officials, who were in Cairo on Thursday to discuss security in the Sinai Peninsula and the Egyptian-brokered cease-fire agreed upon by Gaza's Hamas rulers and Israel last month.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2011 | By Paul Schweizer, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a stellar March, manufacturing activity in the Philadelphia area slowed sharply this month, and the outlook for the next six months dimmed, a survey released Thursday showed. "Nearly all of the survey's broadest indicators remained positive but fell from their readings in the previous month," the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia said in its monthly Business Outlook survey. Some economists and Fed officials nationally have warned of the danger of inflation as the U.S. economy improves, and the Philadelphia Fed's report cautioned that price increases paid by manufacturers in the region for raw materials "continue to be widespread, and a significant percentage of firms reported increases in prices for their own manufactured goods.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2011 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Business activity in the Philadelphia area improved in March, and the outlook for the next six months strengthened slightly, the Federal Reserve reported Wednesday. Local manufacturers and retailers, especially, saw an improvement from February, and there were even spotty gains in bank lending and residential real estate - two sectors still feeling the aftermath of the 2007-09 recession. The Fed's report on Philadelphia was part of its Beige Book, a look at the economy in each of the central bank's 12 regional districts.
NEWS
March 1, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A spark of inspiration struck Ken Haverstick as he lit a fire at his Mount Laurel home. "I was splitting some kindling, and I looked at this piece of wood - the texture - and I thought, 'I could make a petal out of that. I could make a flower,' " he recalls. "So I made a flower. And it took off from there. " What "took off" in the 30 years since his fireside epiphany is an intricate, idiosyncratic craft that combines elements of collage, marquetry, and still life sculpture. From tiny pieces of pine and parts of acorns, seed pods, and other materials he collects from Mother Nature, the 85-year-old retired adman creates rustic yet delicate assemblages of flowers, leaves, and butterflies.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2011 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
DuPont Co., in its biggest acquisition since the purchase of seed company Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc. in the late 1990s, has agreed to pay $5.8 billion for Danisco, a Danish company that makes enzymes used to produce chemicals and fuels from plants. The deal for Danisco, a partner in DuPont's fledgling effort in Tennessee to produce ethanol from corncobs, is designed to accelerate the Wilmington company's gradual shift in raw materials - under way for more than a decade - from fossil fuels to renewable resources.
FOOD
July 29, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
It is an enchanting spread, Blue Elephant Farm, 75 sloping acres, dappled with stone stables, a barn-red barn or two, the occasional sculpted elephant rising in the fields. This is where - on the outskirts of Newtown Square, Delaware County - the urban-farmhouse restaurant called Supper, at 10th and South, procures its "daily [vegetarian] harvest menu. " What Supper's chef Mitch Prensky picks that morning (well, he may skip a day or two), is what you get that night: See those waxy Romanian peppers?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2009 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
A punning exhibition title like "Pulp Function" is either going to make you groan with annoyance or pique your curiosity. If you can overlook the misleading implication - very few of the objects in this show at the James A. Michener Art Museum are the slightest bit functional - give curiosity its head. You'll discover a delightful, if not always aesthetically profound, collection of two- and three-dimensional art made from paper. Garden-variety paper, often recycled or mashed into pulp, appears to have arrived at the transition from mundane utility to imaginative inspiration that other common craft materials, particularly ceramics, went through years ago. "Pulp Function," organized at the Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, Mass.
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