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NEWS
September 16, 2008 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania is lapping up raw milk - the unpasteurized, yellowish, straight-from-the-cow variety - at a booming rate, but the boutique beverage just became harder to find in the suburbs. The state Department of Agriculture suspended the license of the only state-certified seller of raw milk in Montgomery County, Hendricks Farms & Dairy in Telford, on Friday after customers in seven unrelated households came down with gastrointestinal infections tied to the campylobacter bacteria.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Salynn Boyles, For The Inquirer
It was the post that blogger Jo-Lynne Shane says she almost didn't write. When the Pottstown-area woman and her three children got sick from raw milk early last year, she knew she owed it to her readers to write about it. As a blogger about family, fashion, and food, Shane had written of her love for the raw milk from her local organic market. Her family thought it tasted better than regular, pasteurized milk, and she believed it was more nutritious. But she and her husband always worried about whether raw milk could sicken their family.
NEWS
May 22, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the predawn fog of an April morning last year, armed federal agents fanned out across darkened Lancaster County pastures in search of contraband. Months of investigation had led to this point. Strong evidence suggested that Rainbow Acres - a small Amish farm just outside Kinzers - served as the hub of a large-scale smuggling operation responsible for shipping hundreds of gallons of illicit product across state lines. After sweeping past dozing cattle and roosters waiting to crow, the agents finally found what they had come for: dozens of coolers filled with unpasteurized milk.
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - An outbreak of bacterial infections on the East Coast illustrates the popularity of raw, unpasteurized milk despite strong warnings from public health officials about the potential danger. Even presidential candidate Ron Paul has joined the cause of consumers looking to buy unprocessed "real foods" straight from the farm, saying government shouldn't deny them that choice. An outbreak of campylobacter illness is a reminder of the potential hazards, however. Raw milk from a dairy in Chambersburg, Pa., is now linked to 38 cases in four states, and the farm has temporarily suspended sales.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
Pennsylvania health officials warned consumers Wednesday to discard raw milk from the Family Cow farm in Chambersburg due to bacterial contamination. The state Health Department has confirmed five cases of Campylobacter infection in people who drank milk from the farm at 3854 Olde Scotland Road. The state Agriculture Department also collected raw-milk samples from the farm May 17, and on Tuesday confirmed positive tests for Campylobacter, which causes severe diarrhea. The state has ordered a halt to sales there.
NEWS
September 19, 2007 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The forces of consumer choice and health safety collided in a Senate hearing on raw milk yesterday. More than a hundred people, including a cluster of Amish farmers, packed a Senate hearing room to support the production and retail selling of raw milk in Pennsylvania. Equally passionate are health officials and food-safety researchers who say they firmly believe that unpasteurized milk, with its high levels of food-borne pathogens, is unsafe. Senate Agricultural Committee Chairman Michael Brubaker (R., Lancaster)
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | by Frank Kummer, Staff Writer
A 3-year-old boy and a 27-year-old man from South Jersey became ill recently from drinking raw milk from a Pennsylvania farm. New Jersey health officials are warning residents about the risks of drinking unpasteurized milk in wake of the illnesses. The state Department of Health and Senior Services says the two became sick after consuming the milk from Family Cow Dairy in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. The department does not specify when the two became sick. Currently 78 people from several states have fallen ill with Campylobacteriosis, a gastrointestinal illness, from the consumption of raw milk contaminated with bacteria traced to the farm.
FOOD
January 11, 1987 | The Inquirer staff
Thousands of people drink certified raw milk thinking that it is healthful, but a federal judge has ordered a ban on interstate sale of the product, calling it unsafe. U.S. District Judge Norma Johnson, granting a request filed by two public health advocacy groups and a California man, wrote that evidence accumulated over 13 years has shown that "certified raw milk is unsafe. " If the interstate ban fails, she said, the Department of Health and Human Services has the authority to halt sales within states.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Convenience is the key to where most Americans shop for food, especially for something as basic as milk. But that's not the case for Cherry Hill resident Suzanne Musetto, who makes regular trips to Pennsylvania for something she can't buy in New Jersey: raw milk. Musetto swears by the health benefits she perceives in milk that has not been pasteurized, or heat-treated, to kill bacteria: a stronger immune system and better digestion. "Milk that's pasteurized is really a dead product," Musetto said, referring to the destruction of enzymes and beneficial bacteria.
NEWS
May 6, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Department of Agriculture threw its weight at dairy farmer Mark Nolt. They seized his inventory. Twice. They dispatched undercover investigators - including a microbiologist - to a farmers' market on multiple occasions. They assigned their chief counsel to prosecute him. Nolt's crime? Selling raw milk without a permit. Yesterday the defendant, a Mennonite farmer from Newville, north of Harrisburg, was found guilty by a district judge in a tiny courtroom and ordered to pay a fine.
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FOOD
October 10, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
There are more than 100 cheese-makers in the province of Québec, the most of any in Canada, and they are producing some of the most exciting artisan cheeses in the New World, from washed-rind stinkers to creamy blues. That comes as no surprise, given the province's cheese-loving French DNA. Unfortunately, few of the best - especially those made from raw milk - are widely available in the States. That just means you'll have to visit some of the fine cheesemongers of Québec City.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
YOU WOULDN'T expect that a French-trained executive chef in a French-owned hotel chain would have boyish charm and a Midwestern accent that could cast him in an episode of "Fargo. " Yet here's Justin Perdue, who arrived from Chicago this spring to take over the kitchen at Hotel Sofitel Philadelphia, on 17th Street. Originally from Wisconsin, Perdue, 33, trained in Manhattan at the French Culinary Institute and worked under fellow FCI alum Bobby Flay at Bar Americain. Perdue eventually moved to Chicago, working at several places before becoming sous chef at the Michelin-starred Sixteen under chef Frank Brunacci.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
Pennsylvania health officials warned consumers Wednesday to discard raw milk from the Family Cow farm in Chambersburg due to bacterial contamination. The state Health Department has confirmed five cases of Campylobacter infection in people who drank milk from the farm at 3854 Olde Scotland Road. The state Agriculture Department also collected raw-milk samples from the farm May 17, and on Tuesday confirmed positive tests for Campylobacter, which causes severe diarrhea. The state has ordered a halt to sales there.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Salynn Boyles, For The Inquirer
It was the post that blogger Jo-Lynne Shane says she almost didn't write. When the Pottstown-area woman and her three children got sick from raw milk early last year, she knew she owed it to her readers to write about it. As a blogger about family, fashion, and food, Shane had written of her love for the raw milk from her local organic market. Her family thought it tasted better than regular, pasteurized milk, and she believed it was more nutritious. But she and her husband always worried about whether raw milk could sicken their family.
FOOD
January 18, 2013 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Deep under Reading Terminal Market sits a gleaming 600-gallon steel tank connected to the outside world by 100 feet of metal pipe. Every few days, trucks pull up to the dock to fill it with milk from sheep, goats, or cows. Above it, through 18 inches of concrete and amid the bustle of the east side of the market, is a branch of Valley Shepherd Creamery, which opened this week. Unlike most market tenants, which sell products farmed or made elsewhere, Valley Shepherd creates most of its wares on-site.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | Associated Press
A New Jersey cheesemaker made its ricotta cheese from tainted milk that was on its way to a landfill, according to the U.S. Attorney's office in Philadelphia. The raw milk from Pennsylvania had been condemned because of high levels of antibiotics, authorities said. No injuries or illnesses were reported. Lebanon Cheese Co. of Lebanon, Hunterdon County, and its president, Joseph G. Lotito, were charged Monday with a misdemeanor interstate shipping charge. The company paid cash for the discounted milk from D.A. Landis Trucking Inc. of Lancaster, in 2008, although dairy farmers had pledged to dispose of it, prosecutors said.
NEWS
February 27, 2012
States with raw-milk sales have twice the dairy-disease cases States that allow raw-milk sales have more than twice as many dairy-related disease outbreaks as states with prohibitions on such unpasteurized products, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study showed. The rate of incidents caused by raw milk, cheese, and yogurt was 150 times greater than outbreaks linked to pasteurized milk, according to the Atlanta-based CDC's study, published in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | by Frank Kummer, Staff Writer
A 3-year-old boy and a 27-year-old man from South Jersey became ill recently from drinking raw milk from a Pennsylvania farm. New Jersey health officials are warning residents about the risks of drinking unpasteurized milk in wake of the illnesses. The state Department of Health and Senior Services says the two became sick after consuming the milk from Family Cow Dairy in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. The department does not specify when the two became sick. Currently 78 people from several states have fallen ill with Campylobacteriosis, a gastrointestinal illness, from the consumption of raw milk contaminated with bacteria traced to the farm.
NEWS
February 7, 2012
PENNSYLVANIA Raw-milk toll at 43 Pennsylvania health officials said yesterday that the number of people sickened after consuming raw milk from the Family Cow Farm, in Chambersburg, has risen to 43 in four states. Officials said that confirmed cases of Campylobacter infection include 36 people in Pennsylvania, four in Maryland, two in West Virginia and one in New Jersey. Health officials said last week that consumers should discard raw milk purchased since the start of the year from the Franklin County dairy.
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - An outbreak of bacterial infections on the East Coast illustrates the popularity of raw, unpasteurized milk despite strong warnings from public health officials about the potential danger. Even presidential candidate Ron Paul has joined the cause of consumers looking to buy unprocessed "real foods" straight from the farm, saying government shouldn't deny them that choice. An outbreak of campylobacter illness is a reminder of the potential hazards, however. Raw milk from a dairy in Chambersburg, Pa., is now linked to 38 cases in four states, and the farm has temporarily suspended sales.
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