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Ray Charles

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"Your collection could be completely filled with nothing but Ray Charles music," the singer and songwriter Tom Waits mused recently, "and you'd have a fairly complete picture of American music. "You want jazz, there is jazz from him that's not just showroom material, but playing on a we-mean-business level. You want anything in R&B, he is of course the source. He was the one to recognize that you can't really sing country unless you can sing the blues. . . . What's remarkable about it is in his mind it was all music, it all nourished him the same way. " And, crucially, Charles approached all of the music he tackled in the same way. Regardless of the style, Charles sang as though determined to open up lines of communication beyond mere words.
NEWS
June 11, 2004 | By Claude Lewis
Perhaps no other performer in the history of recorded music offered as much truth about soul as Ray Charles, who died yesterday at the age of 73. Born Ray Charles Robinson in Albany, Ga., in 1930, he lost his sight as a young boy but never lost his way in the world of music. He studied music at the St. Augustine, Fla., School for the Blind. Eager to get started on a career, he left school at age of 15, when he formed his own trio and soon developed a personal style with roots from gospel music, country, blues, and jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
It has been too long since Ray Charles made an album of straightforward rhythm and blues like Just Between Us (Columbia ). His voice - a buzzsaw that is at once restless and reassuring - sounds kid-in-a-candy-store overjoyed to be back working with something swinging, both when fronting the big band and in scaled-down duet settings with B.B. King, Gladys Knight and others. It hardly matters that the big-band stuff is overwritten, or that the material doesn't always live up to Charles' level of communication: Even on a wandering ballad like "I Wish I'd Never Loved You at All," Charles beelines for that lonely place in the heart that he alone seems capable of addressing, and reduces Marty Paich's salivating strings to lush window dressing.
NEWS
August 8, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Sept. 29 tribute concert has been scheduled at the Beverly Hilton Hotel to honor the memory of legendary singer Ray Charles. Friends including host Bill Cosby, Michael McDonald, James Ingram, Gerald Levert and Angie Stone will perform at the event, which will raise money for the $15 million Morehouse College Center for the Arts in Atlanta. Charles, who died in June at 73, gave the black liberal arts college $2 million to help fund the complex. O'Donnell gets real How to make money twice?
NEWS
June 11, 2004
Ray Charles died yesterday at 73 after 56 years of gladdening the world with his music. Born in Albany, Ga., black, blind by 7, orphaned by 15, he helped invent soul music and rhythm and blues (the original kind), won 12 Grammys, influenced nearly every singer from 1954 on, and redirected the history of popular music. His importance transcends his hits - although "Georgia on My Mind" and many other songs are treasures. Charles crossed over from standards to country music, from soul to rock to jazz and back, ignoring stereotypes, mixing styles, creating new ones, leaving the world richer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2004 | HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
TATTLE ONCE had a friend in Hollywood who would call in tips to the Star, Enquirer, Globe, Weekly World News, etc. He was one of those guys who would loiter outside A.A. meetings hoping for a celebrity sighting. No, he was not proud of himself. He would tell us that half the stuff in those papers was total nonsense, but when they had someone on their deathbed, that was usually not a good sign. A recent tabloid report that Ray Charles was dying of liver cancer was cause for concern again when the R&B legend showed up Friday at an L.A. event designating his RPM International recording studios a historic landmark.
NEWS
June 11, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Singer and pianist Ray Charles, 73, whose ebullient recordings melded jazz, blues, gospel and R&B into the basic DNA of soul music, died of acute liver disease yesterday morning at his Beverly Hills home. The dapper dynamo, blind since age 7, had been in declining health since hip-replacement surgery last year. He made his last public appearance at an April 30 ceremony to designate his Los Angeles studio a historic landmark. "He was a fabulous man, full of humor and wit," Aretha Franklin said of Mr. Charles, whose hits included "Georgia on My Mind," "Hit the Road Jack," "Busted," and "I Can't Stop Loving You. " "And, of course, he introduced the world to secular soul singing.
NEWS
September 26, 2006 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sure, you could argue that Ray, the 2004 Oscar-winning biopic featuring the transcendent Jamie Foxx in the title role, boosted interest in Ray Charles to an all-time high. But what's not up for debate is that Charles' music made him an American icon long before the movie was even conceived. That's why the revue I Can't Stop Loving You - The Music of Ray Charles, which opens its national tour tonight at the Academy of Music, is fine with celebrating the most important aspect of Charles' passionate, bittersweet, brilliantly creative life - his music.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Knocking around L.A. comedy clubs early in his stand-up career, Jamie Foxx convulsed audiences with an impersonation of a head-bobbing, shoulder-rocking Ray Charles rasping "The Brady Bunch Theme. " But slipping into Charles' skin for Ray, a biopic of the musical revolutionary who married gospel with rock, and R&B with country, required other means. Mimicry, Foxx explains, is an inventory of physical and vocal tics. But "to play Ray, I had to find the place where he was still and quiet," he says, holding forth in a hotel suite and popping M&Ms as if they were vitamins.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rhythm and blues legend Ray Charles will headline Philadelphia's Fourth of July festivities, Mayor Rendell announced yesterday. Charles' performance in front of the Art Museum will highlight a 10-day celebration with 40 free events. With 26 corporations and private institutions lined up as sponsors, Sunoco Welcome America! (the festival's official, paid-for label) will include two nights of fireworks, a lighted boat parade, the awarding of the Liberty Medal, a gospel fest, a performance by Kid Creole and the Coconuts, three parades and - in a departure - 10 neighborhood festivals scattered around the city.
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SPORTS
December 14, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Ray Charles tune buzzed through the speakers at Joe Hand's Gym. Jesse Hart - shirtless and sweating - jostled around the boxing ring last week, throwing jabs at the air. He matched his short white shorts with a pair of high white socks with red and blue stripes at the top. The North Philadelphian dressed like a '70s basketball player, not an up-and-coming boxer. "I'm old school," said Hart, who will fight Saturday in South Philly. "I'm not a 12-round fighter, I'm a 15-round fighter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
SOMEBODY'S got an issue with Britney Spears . First came a story that Spears was planning to lip-sync her entire Las Vegas show, quickly denied by Team Britney, which stressed all the voice training she was doing. Now comes a story on RadarOnline.com that Brit's ticket sales are tanking, with only three of the first 16 dates selling out so far. An anonymous insider told Radar Online: "After spending hundreds of thousands on promo, they expected to instantly sell out all of the first 16 shows, but they didn't come close!"
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
  HARRY Connick Jr. has always been ready with surprises. So why get tripped up that he's doing it again with a rule-breaking, worldly-wise set called "Every Man Should Know" that confounds expectations in the best possible way? We first encountered the now 45-year-old entertainer when he was barely out of his teens as a facile, frisky New Orleans-born-and-stylized jazz pianist. It's a genre Connick revisits regularly. But the world soon learned that he also liked to sing and write "old school" pop songs in a crooning style oft compared to a young Frank Sinatra.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Hillel Italie, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Phil Ramone, 79, the masterful Grammy Award-winning engineer, arranger, and producer whose platinum touch included recordings with Ray Charles, Billy Joel, and Paul Simon, has died, his family said Saturday. Mr. Ramone's son, Matt Ramone, confirmed the death. The family did not immediately release details of the death, but Matt Ramone said his father was "very loving and will be missed. " Few in the recording industry enjoyed a more spectacular and diverse career. Mr. Ramone won 14 competitive Grammy Awards and one for lifetime achievement.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012
1. "This Christmas," Donny Hathaway. The groovin' soul original we all remember Hathaway by, that every young artist still aims to cover, 40-plus years later. 2. "Santa Baby," Eartha Kitt. Oh, did the woman raise a fuss with this steamy and materialistic come-on! 3. "Baby, It's Cold Outside," Ray Charles and Betty Carter. While written in 1949 by Frank Loesser, this 1961 version was first to chart and remains "the standard. " Revealed Brother Ray's lecherous side. Arguably made Carter's career.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
The Hon. Michael A. Nutter, also known as Mixmaster Mike, is a BlackBerry/Microsoft guy, not an iPhone/iPod guy. Here are some of the 2,005 songs on his Microsoft Zune. For a playlist of his music, go to Dan DeLuca's "In the Mix" blog at www.philly.com/inthemix : The Jackson Five, "I Want You Back" Jay-Z and Kanye West, "Otis" Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes feat. Teddy Pendergrass, "Wake Up Everybody," "Don't Leave Me This Way" Laura Izibor, "From My Heart to Yours" Chiddy Bang, "Ray Charles" DJ Kool, "Let Me Clear My Throat" R. Kelly, "I Believe I Can Fly" Patti LaBelle, "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" Marvin Gaye, "What's Goin' On" Public Enemy, "Fight the Power" Gil Scott-Heron, "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"
NEWS
December 9, 2011
Dobie Gray, 69, the smooth balladeer who recorded the timeless hit "Drift Away" in 1973, died in his sleep at his Nashville home Tuesday after a long battle with cancer. He wrote songs for an array of country and pop performers, was a trailblazing entertainer in South Africa, and, in death, a philanthropist. His silky tenor was heard on other hits, including "The In Crowd" in 1965 and "Loving Arms" in 1973. "He had such a unique style, so identifiable," said Bud Reneau, Mr. Gray's friend and songwriting partner.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Decades into the reissue revolution that began with the advent of the CD in the 1980s, the question is: What music is there left to box up? One answer for music fans who know what they want in the holiday shopping season of 2011: Everything. Everything, that is, in the sense of all the work an artist has ever done in one giant box big enough to use as a doorstop or a murder weapon. The biggest all-encompassing boxed set issued this year is the 76-disc Tony Bennett set reviewed below, but there are also compendia devoted to the Smiths, Phil Spector, and others.
NEWS
September 28, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Precisely two hours into I Can't Stop Loving You - The Music of Ray Charles, the engines start to roar. Finally. The spirit of Ray Charles fills the Academy of Music - that sweeping, rich, unstoppable joy that he spread just by the way he delivered a song. You could feel it suddenly envelop the place, as three women sang about their men, then jumped into "Hit the Road, Jack. " With 20 minutes left, the show had just left the runway. So, yes, in the end, I Can't Stop Loving You, which began a long national tour in Kentucky previews last week, sends 'em out singing.
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