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NEWS
June 11, 2004
Do you have stories you would like to share with other readers, tales from long ago or the present? The kind of anecdote you would normally tell a family member, friend or neighbor? We would like to see them and print the best on our local Commentary pages. Please send essays of 300 words or less to: Mysteries, Surprises and Delights c/o Metro Commentary Editor The Philadelphia Inquirer Box 41705 Philadelphia 19101, or E-mail metro@phillynews.com.
NEWS
May 3, 2005
JUST-RELEASED figures indicate that the circulation numbers of a considerable majority of American newspapers continue in a consistent slide, a phenomenon which I greatly lament. Although the technical quality of most newspapers has declined over the years, and the price of subscriptions has been hiked, quite sharply in some instances, I don't believe these are the reasons for diminished interest in our old reliable standard to obtain news. The newspaper is something I look forward to each day. It enables me to be knowledgeable and conversant on local, national and international issues; this is why I read three papers every day plus two weeklies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1991 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last spring, a listener writing to Recorded Books suggested that the company do James Joyce's Ulysses. In a humorous, Joyce-in-cheek response, the company noted: " . . . there's no doubt its a great book poetic too but the thing is 768 pages long thats about 26 cassettes and the other problem is where would we find a reader who could hold her breath for an hour or so while she reads Molly's soliloquy its 45 and a half pages long divided into...
SPORTS
September 27, 2011
Alan Baldwin, of Philadelphia, is the winner of the Daily News' Phillies Clincher Contest. Baldwin was randomly chosen from among those who selected Sept. 17 as the date for the Phillies to clinch their fifth consecutive National League East title. Baldwin will receiver a commemorative Daily News front page from a historic Phillies moment; the chance to put his own headline on a keepsake Daily News front page; and lunch with a member of the DN sports staff.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2006 | By NATALIE HAUGHTON Los Angeles Daily News
Even though many people have never heard of it, the largest cooking magazine in North America is Taste of Home. So notes Catherine Cassidy, senior vice president of Reiman publications, based in Greendale, Wis. With a circulation of 3.4 million, "We're bigger than the top three [food magazines] together," said Cassidy, also editor in chief of the magazine, launched in 1993. Cassidy oversees four cooking-related bi-monthlies - Taste of Home, Simple & Delicious, Light & Tasty and Cooking for 2. All are reader-driven - and contain reader-submitted editorial, including stories, recipes and memories.
NEWS
October 29, 2014
WHEN FOLKS ask me for advice, I have a standard line: "To be clear, you asked me, right?" I preface my answer with this line because it's my way of warning them that they may not like what I have to say. Then there are readers who weren't asked for their opinion but nonetheless feel compelled to offer their thoughts. OK, so from time to time I'll let them weigh in for a feature I'm calling "Money Back Talk. " Let me start with an inheritance question I received during a recent online discussion: "My father, who was extremely wealthy, rewrote his will after my mother died 11 years ago," a reader wrote.
NEWS
July 10, 2010
An alert Daily News reader helped cops nab a fugitive wanted in an attempted rape and sexual assault, authorities said yesterday. Darnell Coleman, 22, whose photo was displayed in the People Paper's "Week's Most Wanted" feature on May 10, was captured Wednesday afternoon on the roof of a relative's home in West Philadelphia, according to the U.S. Marshals Service. Coleman, whose last known address was on 20th Street near McKean in South Philadelphia, was wanted in connection with an attempted rape and sexual assault on Jan. 29, police said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 17, 2015
Here is an excerpt of Craig LaBan's online chat of July 14, 2015: Reader: Did the closing of Matyson (and its replacement with a grilled cheese shop) signal that maybe we've started to hit the saturation point where new openings of restaurants start to threaten the business for old standbys? Craig LaBan: On Matyson: I have not spoken with Matyson owner Butch Puchowitz, so I don't have the whole story on why he closed. But . . . while Matyson maintained a very high level of service and food until the end, it became clear to me that it had run its course without chef Ben Puchowitz (Butch's son)
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Zoë Miller and John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writers
In the biggest storm of anticipation in years, hearts are racing and breaths held throughout the literary world. As Monday turns over into Tuesday, publisher HarperCollins will release Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee. She is the author, now 89, of the 1961 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird , perhaps the most successful U.S. novel ever (40 million-plus sold). She has written no other novels since. She wrote Watchman first, but it postdates the events in Mockingbird (1950s as opposed to Mockingbird 's late 1930s)
FOOD
July 10, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: I got a chance to catch up with Joe Beddia, the busy man at Pizza Beddia, which Bon Appétit named the best pizza in America. Much has changed for the tiny pizza shop in Fishtown. But much has not. The waits are even more insane. And it's not like Beddia is known as a speedy pie-tosser. Better get used to it, for now. Such an honor for an iconoclast like Beddia, even well-deserved, sounds like the definition of a mixed blessing: "It's always good to see good work appreciated, but it's been a little overwhelming.
NEWS
July 9, 2015
AS A PARENT, I'm constantly talking to my children about what's fair, especially when it comes to what my husband and I spend on them. My oldest, a junior in college, occasionally gives me the "stink eye" when her sister or brother gets things that she didn't have at the same age. Sometimes she's right in pointing out the unfairness and we apologize. My husband and I try to keep things as equal as possible, but parental fatigue can get the best of us. In a recent column, I addressed the issue of financial favoritism by parents.
NEWS
July 3, 2015
WHENEVER I'M ABLE, I like to answer reader questions about their individual situations. Here's a transcript of a recent online discussion in which Jonnelle Marte, who writes the Washington Post 's "Get There" personal-finance blog, and I answered people's questions. Q: My teenager was involved in a minor auto accident that unfortunately damaged his car to the tune of $1,000. I feel that he should contribute to the repairs - and he agrees - but not sure how much. He has a part-time job and makes a few hundred dollars a month.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. Nolan, 59, of New Hope, who worked in the family title insurance company his entire adult life, died Sunday, June 21, of liver cancer. The lifelong Bucks County resident, a 1974 graduate of Neshaminy High School, began working at Tohickon Abstract Co. in Holicong soon after graduating from Dartmouth College in 1978. At the time of his death, he was president and co-owner. His brother Patrick called him a "super-hard worker in the family business. " His wife, however, said his family came first.
NEWS
June 12, 2015
SO MUCH OF personal finance is personal and emotional. During a recent online discussion, a reader asked a question about a situation that's all too common. And as part of a regular feature on family financial disagreements, I want to address the issues that the person raised. *  The background: This is a story about two brothers. Their parents have provided significant financial support for the children of the elder son. The parents are helping him pay his bills, because he is unemployed.
FOOD
June 12, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of June 9, 2015: Craig LaBan: In one of the more unexpected turns of restaurant news, talented chef Ezra Duker left the Mainland Inn just a few weeks after earning three bells in a fairly spectacular display of true modern farm-to-table cooking. Duker told me by phone his ultimate goal was to open his own place. He and his pastry chef (and life partner), Sandy Tran, were heading out to travel in Asia, and then decide where to open their own place - in the Bay area (where they met)
SPORTS
June 7, 2015 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
MAIKEL FRANCO has had quite a week. In fact, it's a hot streak Karen Klein will never forget. Klein, of Runnemede, N.J., won $1,000 Friday night in the Daily News Home Run payoff contest, thanks to Franco's third homer in his last four games. "Please tell Maikel Franco, thank you very, very much," an emotional Klein said. "You just made a South Jersey woman very, very happy. " Klein works in the children's clothing department at JCPenney's in the Cherry Hill Mall. A diehard Phillies fan, she was listening as broadcaster Scott Franzke announced her as the latest thousand-dollar winner in our popular contest.
FOOD
May 22, 2015
Craig LaBan: I've been doing some eating - some fantastic ( see my three-bell rave on the fine farm-to-table revamp of the Mainland Inn in Harleysville), and some not great at all ( see my Sunday take on Chinatown's new Bonchon , the Korean fried-chicken franchise that earned a rare "no bell" rating). In other news, we were all extremely concerned to learn that chef Eli Kulp of Fork, High Street on Market, and a.Kitchen was seriously injured in last week's horrific Amtrak accident.
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