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Reading Terminal

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BUSINESS
December 13, 1996 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
When fully developed, the Reading Terminal headhouse building could boost the city's employment rolls with about 425 new jobs. The largest contingent, 150, would work at the Hard Rock Cafe, which hopes to occupy 10,000 square feet on the first floor of the headhouse in late 1997. Other retailers may add as many as 150 jobs. City officials identified one possible tenant yesterday, the Thunder Bay Microbrewery. And if Marriott and the city agree on a 220-room hotel addition on the upper floors of the headhouse, another 125 jobs would be created.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1993 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
The renovated Reading Terminal train shed is meant to impress. Even more than the exhibit hall portion of the Pennsylvania Convention Center, the shed, with its expansive vista and rustic charm, is supposed to make visitors stop and say "wow!" These days, there's still much to be done to get it ready for its opening, scheduled for March. But after months of construction, the dust is starting to settle and through it, one can get a glimpse of how this historic structure is evolving.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | By Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Conflicting reports on the cleanup of PCBs and other contaminants at the Reading Terminal have caused the city to postpone its purchase of the property for the Center City convention center and hotel project, developer Willard G. Rouse announced yesterday. The Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority was scheduled to close the deal on the property Thursday or Friday, Rouse said. A report issued in mid- February by consultants hired by the Reading Co. indicated that PCB levels in the terminal shed, arcade and basement met federal environmental guidelines.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
Reading Terminal Market is packed most weekends. But on Saturday, the popular market will need to make room for a lion. The market and Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation are holding a Chinese New Year celebration on Saturday. The event, scheduled from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., will kick off the Year of the Monkey. Festivities will include a traditional lion dance through the aisles of meat and produce, restaurants and shops, performed by the Philadelphia Suns. The market, at 12th and Arch streets, will also stage food demonstrations from Sang Kee Peking Duck and Chef Joseph Poon, calligraphy, music, tea samplings and crafts.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's the largest single-span train shed in America, the oldest food market in the nation, and once was the largest market under one roof. Today it's the only train shed converted into a chic, modern convention center. The survival of the Reading Terminal is remarkable, and its long history makes an interesting tale. The tale is told well in the recently published "Reading Terminal and Market, Philadelphia's Historic Gateway and Grand Convention Center" by James L. Holton with photos by Carol M. Highsmith.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1992 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Reading Terminal merchants who wanted to stay open late Wednesday nights have been rebuffed by the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority. The market's vendors and restaurant owners, who had planned to participate in the Center City District's "Make It a Night" campaign, were told recently they must close by 6 p.m. to accommodate the convention center's construction schedule. Since the Wednesday night promotion began Sept. 16, participating businesses have stayed open until 8 p.m. to try to keep commuters and city residents out and spending.
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
You might think $522 million is enough to spend for a new convention center. Think again. Just 19 days after cutting the ribbon to open the Pennsylvania Convention Center, the city yesterday spent another $4.3 million to buy its front door. Mayor Rendell announced that the city has bought the historic Reading Terminal headhouse, the ornate 19th-century office building that will provide the only Market Street entrance to the convention center. The headhouse fronts the old Reading train shed, now being renovated as the center's grand ballroom.
NEWS
November 28, 1994
At 34th and Haverford, nobody was talking about the politics of food, hunger or agriculture. It was the day before Thanksgiving, and at the table-top community farmer's market in front of the Mantua Recreation Center, the big question was whether the heaps of collard greens (50 cents a pound), yams, mixed nuts, pears (four for $1), celery and grapes would hold out. Yet it is on wind-swept corners like this - in parts of the city where low- cost, fresh produce can be a rare species - that the Reading Terminal Farmer's Market Trust is testing a model that respects markets, offers a helping hand, promotes small farms and, if it's successful, could even cut the costs of social services by making babies stronger.
NEWS
June 13, 1999 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When looking for a metaphor of the social and economic story of Philadelphia in the last century, historians could do worse than consider the survivor on Market Street East - the Reading Terminal. Completed in 1893, the old train station has outlasted nearly every other structure between Old City and City Hall, weathering the upheavals that transformed the street and the city while preserving the market that can trace its roots back to William Penn. Its builders probably never guessed that its massive, once-grimy train shed would house black-tie affairs, and they certainly never foresaw the giant Hard Rock Cafe electric guitar that spins on its facade.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Food writer Leslie Land said "no" when first asked to come to Philadelphia for the Book and the Cook culinary caper. Later, she changed her mind and said, "OK. " Then somebody said "caterer," which prompted her to change her "OK" back to "no. " Temporarily. The author of Reading Between the Recipes had been a restaurant chef, a job she didn't like. After that, she was a caterer, which she didn't like even more. But the more she learned about the annual foodfest in Philadelphia, the more intrigued she became.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Reading Terminal Market will host a monthly summer outdoor flower market, a new offering for the 125-year-old retail collective. Starting Saturday, and continuing on the last Saturday of each month through September, one block of the street that borders the market's south wall will be closed to traffic and transformed into the Filbert Street Flower Market. On Filbert Street between 11th and 12th Streets, vendors will sell plants, flowers, seeds, and garden supplies. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, a partner on the project, will staff a booth to answer garden and agriculture questions, big and small.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Brian X. McCrone, Staff Writer
Michael Holahan, 58, of Elkins Park, a merchant for three decades at the Reading Terminal Market who became one of the venerable institution's most influential forces, died Wednesday, March 16, of heart failure at Abington Hospital-Jefferson Health. Mr. Holahan and his wife, Julie, opened the Pennsylvania General Store in 1987, when "the market was all beat up," longtime friend Brent Cossrow said. "In a very understated and not visible to the public way, he helped to change the market," said Cossrow, vice chairman of the Reading Terminal Market Corp., whom Mr. Holahan approached a decade ago to be the merchants' first general counsel.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
Reading Terminal Market is packed most weekends. But on Saturday, the popular market will need to make room for a lion. The market and Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation are holding a Chinese New Year celebration on Saturday. The event, scheduled from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., will kick off the Year of the Monkey. Festivities will include a traditional lion dance through the aisles of meat and produce, restaurants and shops, performed by the Philadelphia Suns. The market, at 12th and Arch streets, will also stage food demonstrations from Sang Kee Peking Duck and Chef Joseph Poon, calligraphy, music, tea samplings and crafts.
NEWS
October 1, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
AS THE GOSPEL tells it, the Lord once saw to it that five loaves and two fish were enough to feed 5,000 people. If only the merchants at Reading Terminal Market were so blessed. Purveyors of roast beef and pork, grilled cheese and Chinese food all reported slow or even abysmal sales during the recent papal weekend when a Daily News reporter came calling yesterday. After being told for months to prepare for a massive crowd of visitors here to see Pope Francis and attend the World Meeting of Families, owners of food stands were left with plenty of extra supply.
NEWS
August 28, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
After weeks of deliberations, officials at Reading Terminal Market on Wednesday announced that the block-long food emporium will be open during the weekend of Pope Francis' visit to Center City. The market, at 11th and Arch Streets, falls inside a tight planned security zone drawn by the U.S. Secret Service. It will stay open on a modified schedule, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 25; 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday; and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. "After much planning and preparation, we are pleased to announce that Reading Terminal Market will remain open during the World Meeting of Families Congress and for Pope Francis' visit in September," said Anuj Gupta, the market's general manager, in a statement.
NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The general manager of the Reading Terminal Market met Tuesday with the city's director of emergency management to discuss ways the emporium of food stalls may remain open during Pope Francis' visit next month, in light of stringent security measures. Anuj Gupta has said the merchants are so concerned about running out of food and being unable to get their 350 employees to the job that he might decide to close the block-long tourist attraction at 12th and Arch Streets the weekend of Sept.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Tootsie Iovine-D'Ambrosio turned over a menu the other morning and sat down at her counter to sketch a family tree. A family tree of all the Iovines who work at the Reading Terminal Market. All 17 of them. "Let's see," she said, beginning with her and brother's spot: Tootsie's Salad Express. There's her brother, Tony. Shy Tony, who handles all the books, bills, and worrying. Young Tony, who's learning the ropes from dad. Her daughter Maria, who's as outgoing as her mom, and Maria's adorable little Vinnie.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Domenic and Tommy are the closest thing to royalty at the Reading Terminal Market. Domenic M. Spataro, owner of Spataro's cheesesteaks. Tommy Nicolosi, owner of DiNic's Roast Pork & Beef. Some afternoons, the two old friends allow themselves a liquid lunch at the Terminal bar, Molly Malloy's. Who's going to tell them otherwise? Between them, they have about 85 years of experience at the Terminal. Domenic started working weekends and summers at his father's buttermilk stand when he was 8, then went full time the day after graduating from Northeast High.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER AND BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
ANTHONY RILEY could make almost anyone feel good. You. The girl you're trying to impress. A national TV audience. Our whole grouchy city. The 28-year-old Philadelphia street performer got his big break this year on NBC's "The Voice" by belting out James Brown's "I Got You (I Feel Good). " Within seconds, all four judges were feeling good, too, slamming the red buttons that spin their chairs around and signal their approval. Riley instantly became a crowd favorite. He was being coached by Pharrell Williams and poised to take the next step.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anuj Gupta landed a new job last Friday as general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, and the gig offers equal helpings of his two loves: public service and food. "It's hard to find a place in Philadelphia, let alone anywhere else, that offers you the quality and diversity of product, and affordability, that the terminal does," Gupta said during a walk-through this week. "It's this magnificent, historic place. People love it. " Gupta, who will start June 15, arrives at a critical juncture for the market, which dates to 1892.
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