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Reading Terminal

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BUSINESS
December 13, 1996 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
When fully developed, the Reading Terminal headhouse building could boost the city's employment rolls with about 425 new jobs. The largest contingent, 150, would work at the Hard Rock Cafe, which hopes to occupy 10,000 square feet on the first floor of the headhouse in late 1997. Other retailers may add as many as 150 jobs. City officials identified one possible tenant yesterday, the Thunder Bay Microbrewery. And if Marriott and the city agree on a 220-room hotel addition on the upper floors of the headhouse, another 125 jobs would be created.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1993 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
The renovated Reading Terminal train shed is meant to impress. Even more than the exhibit hall portion of the Pennsylvania Convention Center, the shed, with its expansive vista and rustic charm, is supposed to make visitors stop and say "wow!" These days, there's still much to be done to get it ready for its opening, scheduled for March. But after months of construction, the dust is starting to settle and through it, one can get a glimpse of how this historic structure is evolving.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | By Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Conflicting reports on the cleanup of PCBs and other contaminants at the Reading Terminal have caused the city to postpone its purchase of the property for the Center City convention center and hotel project, developer Willard G. Rouse announced yesterday. The Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority was scheduled to close the deal on the property Thursday or Friday, Rouse said. A report issued in mid- February by consultants hired by the Reading Co. indicated that PCB levels in the terminal shed, arcade and basement met federal environmental guidelines.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's the largest single-span train shed in America, the oldest food market in the nation, and once was the largest market under one roof. Today it's the only train shed converted into a chic, modern convention center. The survival of the Reading Terminal is remarkable, and its long history makes an interesting tale. The tale is told well in the recently published "Reading Terminal and Market, Philadelphia's Historic Gateway and Grand Convention Center" by James L. Holton with photos by Carol M. Highsmith.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1992 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Reading Terminal merchants who wanted to stay open late Wednesday nights have been rebuffed by the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority. The market's vendors and restaurant owners, who had planned to participate in the Center City District's "Make It a Night" campaign, were told recently they must close by 6 p.m. to accommodate the convention center's construction schedule. Since the Wednesday night promotion began Sept. 16, participating businesses have stayed open until 8 p.m. to try to keep commuters and city residents out and spending.
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
You might think $522 million is enough to spend for a new convention center. Think again. Just 19 days after cutting the ribbon to open the Pennsylvania Convention Center, the city yesterday spent another $4.3 million to buy its front door. Mayor Rendell announced that the city has bought the historic Reading Terminal headhouse, the ornate 19th-century office building that will provide the only Market Street entrance to the convention center. The headhouse fronts the old Reading train shed, now being renovated as the center's grand ballroom.
NEWS
November 28, 1994
At 34th and Haverford, nobody was talking about the politics of food, hunger or agriculture. It was the day before Thanksgiving, and at the table-top community farmer's market in front of the Mantua Recreation Center, the big question was whether the heaps of collard greens (50 cents a pound), yams, mixed nuts, pears (four for $1), celery and grapes would hold out. Yet it is on wind-swept corners like this - in parts of the city where low- cost, fresh produce can be a rare species - that the Reading Terminal Farmer's Market Trust is testing a model that respects markets, offers a helping hand, promotes small farms and, if it's successful, could even cut the costs of social services by making babies stronger.
NEWS
June 13, 1999 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When looking for a metaphor of the social and economic story of Philadelphia in the last century, historians could do worse than consider the survivor on Market Street East - the Reading Terminal. Completed in 1893, the old train station has outlasted nearly every other structure between Old City and City Hall, weathering the upheavals that transformed the street and the city while preserving the market that can trace its roots back to William Penn. Its builders probably never guessed that its massive, once-grimy train shed would house black-tie affairs, and they certainly never foresaw the giant Hard Rock Cafe electric guitar that spins on its facade.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Food writer Leslie Land said "no" when first asked to come to Philadelphia for the Book and the Cook culinary caper. Later, she changed her mind and said, "OK. " Then somebody said "caterer," which prompted her to change her "OK" back to "no. " Temporarily. The author of Reading Between the Recipes had been a restaurant chef, a job she didn't like. After that, she was a caterer, which she didn't like even more. But the more she learned about the annual foodfest in Philadelphia, the more intrigued she became.
LIVING
March 11, 1994 | By Lucinda Fleeson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The long, carpeted corridor gives no intimation of what awaits. It is like a wide, pleasantly decorated hospital hallway. Only at the end of this bland tunnel are there glimpses that the space is about to open up. Then one steps into a vast, domed hall that elevates the spirit, inspires wonder, and can produce a gasp of appreciation. Above, great cast-iron trusses arc 90 feet into the air, soaring black projectiles that enclose a space with shimmering marble floors. Piercing the roofline between the trusses are long slits of skylight that suffuse the space with light.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Tootsie Iovine-D'Ambrosio turned over a menu the other morning and sat down at her counter to sketch a family tree. A family tree of all the Iovines who work at the Reading Terminal Market. All 17 of them. "Let's see," she said, beginning with her and brother's spot: Tootsie's Salad Express. There's her brother, Tony. Shy Tony, who handles all the books, bills, and worrying. Young Tony, who's learning the ropes from dad. Her daughter Maria, who's as outgoing as her mom, and Maria's adorable little Vinnie.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Domenic and Tommy are the closest thing to royalty at the Reading Terminal Market. Domenic M. Spataro, owner of Spataro's cheesesteaks. Tommy Nicolosi, owner of DiNic's Roast Pork & Beef. Some afternoons, the two old friends allow themselves a liquid lunch at the Terminal bar, Molly Malloy's. Who's going to tell them otherwise? Between them, they have about 85 years of experience at the Terminal. Domenic started working weekends and summers at his father's buttermilk stand when he was 8, then went full time the day after graduating from Northeast High.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER AND BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
ANTHONY RILEY could make almost anyone feel good. You. The girl you're trying to impress. A national TV audience. Our whole grouchy city. The 28-year-old Philadelphia street performer got his big break this year on NBC's "The Voice" by belting out James Brown's "I Got You (I Feel Good). " Within seconds, all four judges were feeling good, too, slamming the red buttons that spin their chairs around and signal their approval. Riley instantly became a crowd favorite. He was being coached by Pharrell Williams and poised to take the next step.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anuj Gupta landed a new job last Friday as general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, and the gig offers equal helpings of his two loves: public service and food. "It's hard to find a place in Philadelphia, let alone anywhere else, that offers you the quality and diversity of product, and affordability, that the terminal does," Gupta said during a walk-through this week. "It's this magnificent, historic place. People love it. " Gupta, who will start June 15, arrives at a critical juncture for the market, which dates to 1892.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2015 | Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading Terminal Market on Friday named Anuj Gupta its general manager. The announcement was made by the market's board of directors after an extensive search process, Chairman Albert Mezzaroba said. "Anuj brings a rare blend of management success, not-for-profit leadership and vision at a consequential time in the market's history," Mezzaroba said. Gupta, 41, takes over the position that has been vacant since Paul Steinke stepped down on Dec. 31, 2014 to run for an at-large City Council seat.
NEWS
April 28, 2015
Editor's note: Chillin' Wit' is a regular Monday feature of the Daily News that spotlights a name in the news away from the job.   EVEN ON A SUNDAY, Kim and George Mickel are on a mission. The longtime owners of Reading Terminal Market's By George eatery recently opened Hunger Burger in the market, with part of the proceeds from each "patty with a purpose" going to feed a child in need. When they take a break, it's at their Cherry Hill church, reflecting on what inspired them to sell burgers for a bigger cause.
FOOD
February 6, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
For their third stand at Reading Terminal Market, George and Kim Mickel have gone with burgers. Hunger Burger , replacing the Tokyo sushi stand smack in the middle of center court, joins By George, their Italian stand on the Filbert Street side (1990), and Mezze, a Mediterranean takeaway (2003). The name refers more to the Mickels' mission than to a customer's belly. They went to El Salvador with their church to work with King's Castle Ministries, supporting feeding programs.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN & MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writers brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THE MAY 19 DEMOCRATIC primary election is shaping up with some new faces expected on the ballot and one veteran city politician wrapping up her tenure. City Councilwoman Marian Tasco, leader of the 50th Ward, told her committee people Monday night that she will not run for an eighth term in the 9th District. Tasco yesterday said she hopes state Rep. Cherelle Parker takes her place on Council. Parker, who started her career as a high-school intern in Tasco's City Hall office, said she has been in "nonstop" conversations since Monday's announcement.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
When Paul Steinke arrived in 2001 to become the new general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, the beloved Philadelphia institution was in need of a delicate update and future vision. To remain relevant, one of the oldest continuously operating public markets in the country had to evolve without losing its diversity or historic character. Thirteen years later, the market has been significantly reshaped by expanded hours, a major redesign, and several bright new tenants. Visitors since 2003 have increased by 30 percent, to 6.2 million people a year.
NEWS
September 12, 2014
BASEMENTS, basically by definition, are the ugly and unloved stepchildren of any tiered structure. A damp, dank place to stack cardboard boxes full of ex-lovers' stuff. A resting place for never-used exercise equipment. A sunlight-free ecosystem perfect for the cultivation of cobwebs and dust bunnies. An eminently unsafe hiding place for psychotic clowns armed with blood-stained garden equipment. (Just me?) But none of these subterranean stereotypes, even the totally rational killer-clown one, apply to what lies beneath the Reading Terminal Market, one of Philadelphia's most recognized historical and culinary contributions.
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