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Reading Terminal Market

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NEWS
January 10, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the windows of her fourth-floor office at City Hall, redevelopment director Sandy Forosisky can see the front of 99 Cent Dreams, the 38,000-square-foot value store at the center of what has long been a languishing downtown. Starting in March, that view will change. The Landis Avenue dollar store is slated to be converted into a year-round public market, selling local produce, meat, seafood, specialty items, and prepared food. With it, Forosisky is hoping the city's center will change, too. The $5.62 million project, which Forosisky calls a "mini Reading Terminal," is the foundation for a $59 million city makeover.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2011 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading Terminal Market has fed generations of Philadelphians, wowed countless tourists and conventioneers, and set the gold standard for public markets across the country. But the market's growing profile and increasing sales, swelled by the expanded Convention Center, have created a need for more space - a good problem to have if the market weren't landlocked. "We are maxed out on space," said longtime general manager Paul Steinke. After Labor Day, several tenants are moving to larger spaces within the market as part of a $3.5 million revitalization.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
In an old city neighborhood where many people don't drive, a supermarket within walking distance is a necessity, say Mantua community leaders. In Mantua, that becomes one more necessity people learn to live without. Three years ago, the neighborhood's only full-service grocery, on Haverford Avenue near 34th Street, closed after a fire. Since then, Mantua residents who depend primarily on their feet for transportation either have had to buy groceries at small, expensive convenience stores or at the closest commercial shopping strip, 42nd Street and Lancaster Avenue, 10 blocks or more away, according to Charles C. Cole Jr., a community activist and board member of Mantua Community Developers.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | By Leon Taylor and Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writers
If you thought it was raining hard outside yesterday, you should have seen it inside the Reading Terminal Market in Center City. Parts of the market, at 12th and Arch streets, were flooded with up to five inches of rainwater that had leaked through the roof and floor of the train shed overhead, cascading into the market below. The large puddles forced at least six merchants to close their businesses and kept many shoppers from venturing inside to reach the shops that remained open.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | BY BRIAN RUDNICK
We're marching to City Council today and we're asking the people of this city to join us. We're the merchants of the Reading Terminal Market and we're marching mad. We were promised the sky and we're getting it - soaking filthy rainwater. For several months, we and our customers have endured deafening jackhammering, falling debris and paint chips, cascading water, flooding, mice, city health inspectors, grandstanding politicians and more. It's like the 10 plagues. Take us to the promised land!
BUSINESS
July 8, 2000 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by the glitz of the Convention Center, the Reading Terminal Market is struggling to hold on to its character as a farmers' market. It battles the growing perception that it has become just another mall-like food court, said Marcy Rogovin, general manager of Reading Terminal Market Corp. To help in the fight, the venerable market soon will be decorated with 20 handcrafted outdoor signs, at a cost of $100,000, to remind passersby that the place is still what it has always been.
NEWS
November 14, 1987 | By Bob Brecht
With luck, it may turn out that Philadelphia's new Convention Center won't damage "important Philadelphia values" or that it will "enhance and bring to life some of our finest historical monuments" as Edmund N. Bacon asserts (Op-ed Page, Nov. 8). But I'm not betting on it until I've seen some thoughtful planning and careful budgeting to help the historic Reading Terminal Market survive the four-year construction period. I'm one of the merchants there and, so far at least, I haven't heard of a sound plan to help the market make it, period, forget enhancing the neighborhood.
NEWS
November 17, 2005 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's lunchtime at Reading Terminal Market, and the cacophony of the crowd, piano player and pushcarts is building. The regulars lay claim to their seats as tourists and conventioneering nephrologists shuffle along the "avenues" separating the 76 merchants. On this day, it's easy to believe five million people a year visit the 112-year-old market. But in his cramped loft office above the market floor, general manager Paul Steinke's mind is on just 400 of them. They are shoppers stopped on the market floor this year and asked about buying habits.
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NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
NBC10'S DEANNA DURANTE is a mom again. The reporter, along with husband, Tim Swan , welcomed Mattax McQuain Swan, a/k/a Mattie, in the wee hours of yesterday morning. The 7-pound, 14-ounce Mattie joins 2-year-old Maya in the Durante-Swan clan. Both mom and baby are doing swimmingly.   'Man'-ly red carpet Michael Ealy and Megan Good , the stars of "Think Like a Man Too," will walk the red carpet at the Prince Music Theater (1412 Chestnut St.)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
THE PREVAILING narrative about Jason Mott is that he's an overnight success. Mott's debut novel, The Returned - about people who mysteriously return from the dead and the reaction to their reappearance - was adapted into the hit ABC TV series "Resurrection. " But that story doesn't include the five manuscripts Mott shopped around before The Returned hit it big, or Mott's tenure as a Verizon customer-service rep after graduating from the creative-writing program at the University of North Carolina, which allowed him to work days and write at night.
NEWS
January 17, 2014
E VAN URBANIA, 33, of Southwest Center City, and Matthew Ray, 43, of South Philadelphia, are co-founders of ChatterBlast Media on 13th Street near Sansom in Midtown Village. The firm builds online strategies to target customers through social media, multimedia and advertising. Urbania is CEO; Ray is creative director. I spoke with Urbania. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for ChatterBlast? A: After the markets collapsed in 2008, Matthew and I weren't working full time and had small consulting gigs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Len Davidson is always up for a little light banter. That is, as long as the light in question isn't LED. "LEDs," he said, "are the enemy. " After all, Davidson has spent 33 years championing LEDs' precursor, neon, as a historian, preservationist, and craftsman. Now, he can count at least one victory in that long battle. It's on display along 12th and Arch Streets, where, he said, "it's like a little neon paradise right now. " What he sees as a growing illuminated corridor begins at 12th and Market, where Hard Rock Cafe's neon-trimmed electric guitar does perpetual pirouettes, and continues north through the neon-happy Reading Terminal Market (Davidson, 66, made or restored about half the signs there, including the huge classic sign marking the entrance)
BUSINESS
December 24, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Paul Steinke, 49, became general manager of the Reading Terminal Market in 2001, a voice in his head cautioned him that he might be joining a dying institution. Hard to imagine why, considering that the market, especially crowded around big food holidays like Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter, attracts 115,000 visitors a week. One of America's oldest and largest public markets, it is also one of the city's top tourist attractions. Question: What worried you in 2001?
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Blacked-out and locked doors at 801 Market St. were opened once again Saturday, allowing hundreds of people to step onto the marble floor of the building that once housed Strawbridge & Clothier, part of whose first floor now hosts the "Franklin Flea" pop-up flea market. Many of the visitors once worked or shopped in the building and were drawn back by nostalgia. As 40 vendors hawked their wares - vintage posters, furniture, artwork, clothing - people browsed or began their holiday shopping.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN Barbara Ann Fox set up housekeeping in Center City in the early '60s, she couldn't boil water. A slight exaggeration, but she was definitely culinarily challenged. Typical of Barbara's can-do nature, which she carried throughout her busy life, she became such an expert at cooking that she was a legend among friends and family - and much in demand. People wanted her to cater their parties. Her Christmas cookies were almost too creative to eat. Barbara Fox - a great cook, a skilled seamstress who made clothes for herself and others, an avid quilter, a painter whose watercolors were cherished by family and friends, and a community activist - died Oct. 13 of cardiac arrest.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
EVERY DAY for the last 17 years, a desolate stretch of Hope Street has haunted Paulette Smith as she passed high above the North Philadelphia block during her commute to work on the El. It was on that gray, litter-clogged block near Montgomery Avenue where her teenage daughter's battered, lifeless body was found inside an abandoned house in October 1996, two days after a stranger had snatched her off the street only steps away from the safety of...
FOOD
January 18, 2013 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Deep under Reading Terminal Market sits a gleaming 600-gallon steel tank connected to the outside world by 100 feet of metal pipe. Every few days, trucks pull up to the dock to fill it with milk from sheep, goats, or cows. Above it, through 18 inches of concrete and amid the bustle of the east side of the market, is a branch of Valley Shepherd Creamery, which opened this week. Unlike most market tenants, which sell products farmed or made elsewhere, Valley Shepherd creates most of its wares on-site.
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Tom George, 43, a trip to Philadelphia with his family has been a staple of the start of the Christmas season. George now lives in Oakton, Va., but gladly travels the 150-plus miles up I-95 to his childhood home. "We come up for the light show every Christmas," George said. "My dad worked at Wanamakers, so I was actually able to play with the lights in between the shows when I was a kid. " Although the light show at what is now a Macy's has been a Philadelphia institution since its debut in 1955, a more recent holiday exhibition is bringing together generations of families like the Georges.
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