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Reading Terminal Market

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NEWS
January 10, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the windows of her fourth-floor office at City Hall, redevelopment director Sandy Forosisky can see the front of 99 Cent Dreams, the 38,000-square-foot value store at the center of what has long been a languishing downtown. Starting in March, that view will change. The Landis Avenue dollar store is slated to be converted into a year-round public market, selling local produce, meat, seafood, specialty items, and prepared food. With it, Forosisky is hoping the city's center will change, too. The $5.62 million project, which Forosisky calls a "mini Reading Terminal," is the foundation for a $59 million city makeover.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2011 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading Terminal Market has fed generations of Philadelphians, wowed countless tourists and conventioneers, and set the gold standard for public markets across the country. But the market's growing profile and increasing sales, swelled by the expanded Convention Center, have created a need for more space - a good problem to have if the market weren't landlocked. "We are maxed out on space," said longtime general manager Paul Steinke. After Labor Day, several tenants are moving to larger spaces within the market as part of a $3.5 million revitalization.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
In an old city neighborhood where many people don't drive, a supermarket within walking distance is a necessity, say Mantua community leaders. In Mantua, that becomes one more necessity people learn to live without. Three years ago, the neighborhood's only full-service grocery, on Haverford Avenue near 34th Street, closed after a fire. Since then, Mantua residents who depend primarily on their feet for transportation either have had to buy groceries at small, expensive convenience stores or at the closest commercial shopping strip, 42nd Street and Lancaster Avenue, 10 blocks or more away, according to Charles C. Cole Jr., a community activist and board member of Mantua Community Developers.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | By Leon Taylor and Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writers
If you thought it was raining hard outside yesterday, you should have seen it inside the Reading Terminal Market in Center City. Parts of the market, at 12th and Arch streets, were flooded with up to five inches of rainwater that had leaked through the roof and floor of the train shed overhead, cascading into the market below. The large puddles forced at least six merchants to close their businesses and kept many shoppers from venturing inside to reach the shops that remained open.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | BY BRIAN RUDNICK
We're marching to City Council today and we're asking the people of this city to join us. We're the merchants of the Reading Terminal Market and we're marching mad. We were promised the sky and we're getting it - soaking filthy rainwater. For several months, we and our customers have endured deafening jackhammering, falling debris and paint chips, cascading water, flooding, mice, city health inspectors, grandstanding politicians and more. It's like the 10 plagues. Take us to the promised land!
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
When Paul Steinke arrived in 2001 to become the new general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, the beloved Philadelphia institution was in need of a delicate update and future vision. To remain relevant, one of the oldest continuously operating public markets in the country had to evolve without losing its diversity or historic character. Thirteen years later, the market has been significantly reshaped by expanded hours, a major redesign, and several bright new tenants. Visitors since 2003 have increased by 30 percent, to 6.2 million people a year.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2000 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by the glitz of the Convention Center, the Reading Terminal Market is struggling to hold on to its character as a farmers' market. It battles the growing perception that it has become just another mall-like food court, said Marcy Rogovin, general manager of Reading Terminal Market Corp. To help in the fight, the venerable market soon will be decorated with 20 handcrafted outdoor signs, at a cost of $100,000, to remind passersby that the place is still what it has always been.
NEWS
November 14, 1987 | By Bob Brecht
With luck, it may turn out that Philadelphia's new Convention Center won't damage "important Philadelphia values" or that it will "enhance and bring to life some of our finest historical monuments" as Edmund N. Bacon asserts (Op-ed Page, Nov. 8). But I'm not betting on it until I've seen some thoughtful planning and careful budgeting to help the historic Reading Terminal Market survive the four-year construction period. I'm one of the merchants there and, so far at least, I haven't heard of a sound plan to help the market make it, period, forget enhancing the neighborhood.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 17, 2015 | Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading Terminal Market on Friday named Anuj Gupta its general manager. The announcement was made by the market's board of directors after an extensive search process, Chairman Albert Mezzaroba said. "Anuj brings a rare blend of management success, not-for-profit leadership and vision at a consequential time in the market's history," Mezzaroba said. Gupta, 41, takes over the position that has been vacant since Paul Steinke stepped down on Dec. 31, 2014 to run for an at-large City Council seat.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
IF THERE'S a "silver lining" to splitting with lingerie model Suki Waterhouse , it appears that Bradley Cooper has found it. Cooper was spotted smooching with Sports Illustrated swimsuit model Irina Shayk outside a London hotel Monday night. The UK's Daily Mail reports that Shayk, 29, and Cooper, 40, were all smiles as they exited the Novikov Restaurant and Bar . Photos surfaced online yesterday of the Hollywood heart throb and the Russian model coyly ducking and dodging paparazzi as they got into a cab in London's Mayfair section.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council on Thursday approved a controversial bill that would allow two huge, animated, three-dimensional billboards in Center City. Councilman Mark Squilla's ordinance permitting the hybrid-movie screen/digital sculptures, dubbed "urban experiential displays," passed, 15-1. A companion bill authorizing location of the boards and specifying the approval process passed 13-3. If approved by the Art Commission, one display, a hand holding up a globe, would sit outside of Reading Terminal Market.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council is slated to vote Thursday on a plan to bring two digital billboards to Center City. The bill, sponsored by Councilman Mark Squilla, allows for "urban experiential displays" near the Convention Center and Reading Terminal Market. Squilla has said there is widespread support for the bill, citing 300 letters sent to his office and more than 100 people expected to speak in favor of the digital billboards. A review by The Inquirer of the typed letters shows they are identical and that the signatures are in the same cursive font.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'When all goes wrong . . . smile a lot. " Such was the advice that conductor Scott Terrell gave to the everyday people who stepped up to lead a Philadelphia Orchestra contingent Monday at the Reading Terminal Market. Orchestra players have performed pop-ups from Macau to the Comcast Center, and Monday morning word went out on the Internet that this one would be a "Conduct Us" program, where listeners could become participants and get a souvenir baton. No way the entire orchestra could fit at the northerly end of the crowded market, of course.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com,215-854-4890
A REGIONAL rail power failure left local travelers scrambling for another way home yesterday. "I'll give you a cannoli for a ride home," said Maryanne Lalli of Bristol, Bucks County. She scored a free loaf of bread from one of the shops in Reading Terminal Market because the loaf was a little bit crushed. Lalli, her husband and his parents made their way to the Philadelphia Flower Show at the Pennsylvania Convention Center because they had a day off thanks to the snow. "We figured it would be less crowded than the weekend," she said.
FOOD
February 20, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Eight years ago, Reading Terminal Market restaurateurs George and Kim Mickel joined a mission trip to El Salvador and began a love affair with villagers there whom they now visit annually with food, medicine and supplies. So when space in the center of the market became available last year, they decided to combine two of their passions: providing good food and doing good. The couple behind the Reading Terminal Market stands By George! and Mezze (which they recently closed) have opened Hunger Burger to sell "patties with a purpose.
FOOD
February 20, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Pho has become a thing, all right. Add a new Lower Northeast Philadelphia branch of South Philadelphia's Pho Ha Saigon to the mix. The new location (575 Adams Ave., 267-538-5600) is a contemporary Vietnamese BYOB with a ballroom-size dining room and an easy-on-the-budget menu of large-portioned dishes as well as the signature soup. A takeout counter is on the way, too. The same family also is behind the two-week-old Pho 20 in Chinatown (234 N. 10th St., 215-413-2020), a more spartan BYOB that replaced the long-running Charles Plaza.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
IT'S NOT UNUSUAL to see someone reading a book while chowing down at Reading Terminal Market. Now, two is a whole different story - Milton Barham's story. Just as he does most every day at lunch, Barham recently sat at a table inside the bustling market reading two books at once. In his right hand, Barham held John Piper's What Jesus Demands From the World . In his left, Joyce Meyer's Battlefield of the Mind: Winning the Battle in Your Mind . If the two-fisted reader felt the judgmental stares of passers-by, he didn't let on. Same with the snickering and drive-by psychological assessments.
FOOD
February 6, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
For their third stand at Reading Terminal Market, George and Kim Mickel have gone with burgers. Hunger Burger , replacing the Tokyo sushi stand smack in the middle of center court, joins By George, their Italian stand on the Filbert Street side (1990), and Mezze, a Mediterranean takeaway (2003). The name refers more to the Mickels' mission than to a customer's belly. They went to El Salvador with their church to work with King's Castle Ministries, supporting feeding programs.
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