CollectionsReading Terminal Market
IN THE NEWS

Reading Terminal Market

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 10, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the windows of her fourth-floor office at City Hall, redevelopment director Sandy Forosisky can see the front of 99 Cent Dreams, the 38,000-square-foot value store at the center of what has long been a languishing downtown. Starting in March, that view will change. The Landis Avenue dollar store is slated to be converted into a year-round public market, selling local produce, meat, seafood, specialty items, and prepared food. With it, Forosisky is hoping the city's center will change, too. The $5.62 million project, which Forosisky calls a "mini Reading Terminal," is the foundation for a $59 million city makeover.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2011 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading Terminal Market has fed generations of Philadelphians, wowed countless tourists and conventioneers, and set the gold standard for public markets across the country. But the market's growing profile and increasing sales, swelled by the expanded Convention Center, have created a need for more space - a good problem to have if the market weren't landlocked. "We are maxed out on space," said longtime general manager Paul Steinke. After Labor Day, several tenants are moving to larger spaces within the market as part of a $3.5 million revitalization.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
In an old city neighborhood where many people don't drive, a supermarket within walking distance is a necessity, say Mantua community leaders. In Mantua, that becomes one more necessity people learn to live without. Three years ago, the neighborhood's only full-service grocery, on Haverford Avenue near 34th Street, closed after a fire. Since then, Mantua residents who depend primarily on their feet for transportation either have had to buy groceries at small, expensive convenience stores or at the closest commercial shopping strip, 42nd Street and Lancaster Avenue, 10 blocks or more away, according to Charles C. Cole Jr., a community activist and board member of Mantua Community Developers.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | BY BRIAN RUDNICK
We're marching to City Council today and we're asking the people of this city to join us. We're the merchants of the Reading Terminal Market and we're marching mad. We were promised the sky and we're getting it - soaking filthy rainwater. For several months, we and our customers have endured deafening jackhammering, falling debris and paint chips, cascading water, flooding, mice, city health inspectors, grandstanding politicians and more. It's like the 10 plagues. Take us to the promised land!
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Tootsie Iovine-D'Ambrosio turned over a menu the other morning and sat down at her counter to sketch a family tree. A family tree of all the Iovines who work at the Reading Terminal Market. All 17 of them. "Let's see," she said, beginning with her and brother's spot: Tootsie's Salad Express. There's her brother, Tony. Shy Tony, who handles all the books, bills, and worrying. Young Tony, who's learning the ropes from dad. Her daughter Maria, who's as outgoing as her mom, and Maria's adorable little Vinnie.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2000 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by the glitz of the Convention Center, the Reading Terminal Market is struggling to hold on to its character as a farmers' market. It battles the growing perception that it has become just another mall-like food court, said Marcy Rogovin, general manager of Reading Terminal Market Corp. To help in the fight, the venerable market soon will be decorated with 20 handcrafted outdoor signs, at a cost of $100,000, to remind passersby that the place is still what it has always been.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
When Paul Steinke arrived in 2001 to become the new general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, the beloved Philadelphia institution was in need of a delicate update and future vision. To remain relevant, one of the oldest continuously operating public markets in the country had to evolve without losing its diversity or historic character. Thirteen years later, the market has been significantly reshaped by expanded hours, a major redesign, and several bright new tenants. Visitors since 2003 have increased by 30 percent, to 6.2 million people a year.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Tootsie Iovine-D'Ambrosio turned over a menu the other morning and sat down at her counter to sketch a family tree. A family tree of all the Iovines who work at the Reading Terminal Market. All 17 of them. "Let's see," she said, beginning with her and brother's spot: Tootsie's Salad Express. There's her brother, Tony. Shy Tony, who handles all the books, bills, and worrying. Young Tony, who's learning the ropes from dad. Her daughter Maria, who's as outgoing as her mom, and Maria's adorable little Vinnie.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Domenic and Tommy are the closest thing to royalty at the Reading Terminal Market. Domenic M. Spataro, owner of Spataro's cheesesteaks. Tommy Nicolosi, owner of DiNic's Roast Pork & Beef. Some afternoons, the two old friends allow themselves a liquid lunch at the Terminal bar, Molly Malloy's. Who's going to tell them otherwise? Between them, they have about 85 years of experience at the Terminal. Domenic started working weekends and summers at his father's buttermilk stand when he was 8, then went full time the day after graduating from Northeast High.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony Riley, 28, a Philadelphia street performer who left NBC's singing-competition show The Voice in January to deal with substance-abuse issues, was found dead Friday. Over the last decade, Mr. Riley had been a fixture in Center City, crooning Motown and pop songs for tips on the bustling streets outside Reading Terminal Market, Penn's Landing, and Independence Hall. Since leaving the TV show, he had been working on an album but continued to struggle with addiction, his friends and family said Saturday.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anuj Gupta landed a new job last Friday as general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, and the gig offers equal helpings of his two loves: public service and food. "It's hard to find a place in Philadelphia, let alone anywhere else, that offers you the quality and diversity of product, and affordability, that the terminal does," Gupta said during a walk-through this week. "It's this magnificent, historic place. People love it. " Gupta, who will start June 15, arrives at a critical juncture for the market, which dates to 1892.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | Joseph Brandt, Dan Spinelli & Annie Palmer, Daily News Staff Writers
ANTHONY Hardy Williams worked the Center City lunchtime crowd after someone slashed his wife's car tire outside their West Philly home overnight. Lynne Abraham dodged a heckler during a meet-and-greet at the Clothespin near City Hall. Nelson Diaz chatted up commuters with a former U.S. transportation secretary in his entourage. Jim Kenney tweeted. Doug Oliver talked with North Philly subway riders and attended a health fair. Milton Street hit busy street corners and said that a huge upset was looming.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2015 | Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading Terminal Market on Friday named Anuj Gupta its general manager. The announcement was made by the market's board of directors after an extensive search process, Chairman Albert Mezzaroba said. "Anuj brings a rare blend of management success, not-for-profit leadership and vision at a consequential time in the market's history," Mezzaroba said. Gupta, 41, takes over the position that has been vacant since Paul Steinke stepped down on Dec. 31, 2014 to run for an at-large City Council seat.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
IF THERE'S a "silver lining" to splitting with lingerie model Suki Waterhouse , it appears that Bradley Cooper has found it. Cooper was spotted smooching with Sports Illustrated swimsuit model Irina Shayk outside a London hotel Monday night. The UK's Daily Mail reports that Shayk, 29, and Cooper, 40, were all smiles as they exited the Novikov Restaurant and Bar . Photos surfaced online yesterday of the Hollywood heart throb and the Russian model coyly ducking and dodging paparazzi as they got into a cab in London's Mayfair section.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council on Thursday approved a controversial bill that would allow two huge, animated, three-dimensional billboards in Center City. Councilman Mark Squilla's ordinance permitting the hybrid-movie screen/digital sculptures, dubbed "urban experiential displays," passed, 15-1. A companion bill authorizing location of the boards and specifying the approval process passed 13-3. If approved by the Art Commission, one display, a hand holding up a globe, would sit outside of Reading Terminal Market.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council is slated to vote Thursday on a plan to bring two digital billboards to Center City. The bill, sponsored by Councilman Mark Squilla, allows for "urban experiential displays" near the Convention Center and Reading Terminal Market. Squilla has said there is widespread support for the bill, citing 300 letters sent to his office and more than 100 people expected to speak in favor of the digital billboards. A review by The Inquirer of the typed letters shows they are identical and that the signatures are in the same cursive font.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'When all goes wrong . . . smile a lot. " Such was the advice that conductor Scott Terrell gave to the everyday people who stepped up to lead a Philadelphia Orchestra contingent Monday at the Reading Terminal Market. Orchestra players have performed pop-ups from Macau to the Comcast Center, and Monday morning word went out on the Internet that this one would be a "Conduct Us" program, where listeners could become participants and get a souvenir baton. No way the entire orchestra could fit at the northerly end of the crowded market, of course.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|