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Reading Terminal Market

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NEWS
January 10, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the windows of her fourth-floor office at City Hall, redevelopment director Sandy Forosisky can see the front of 99 Cent Dreams, the 38,000-square-foot value store at the center of what has long been a languishing downtown. Starting in March, that view will change. The Landis Avenue dollar store is slated to be converted into a year-round public market, selling local produce, meat, seafood, specialty items, and prepared food. With it, Forosisky is hoping the city's center will change, too. The $5.62 million project, which Forosisky calls a "mini Reading Terminal," is the foundation for a $59 million city makeover.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2011 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading Terminal Market has fed generations of Philadelphians, wowed countless tourists and conventioneers, and set the gold standard for public markets across the country. But the market's growing profile and increasing sales, swelled by the expanded Convention Center, have created a need for more space - a good problem to have if the market weren't landlocked. "We are maxed out on space," said longtime general manager Paul Steinke. After Labor Day, several tenants are moving to larger spaces within the market as part of a $3.5 million revitalization.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
In an old city neighborhood where many people don't drive, a supermarket within walking distance is a necessity, say Mantua community leaders. In Mantua, that becomes one more necessity people learn to live without. Three years ago, the neighborhood's only full-service grocery, on Haverford Avenue near 34th Street, closed after a fire. Since then, Mantua residents who depend primarily on their feet for transportation either have had to buy groceries at small, expensive convenience stores or at the closest commercial shopping strip, 42nd Street and Lancaster Avenue, 10 blocks or more away, according to Charles C. Cole Jr., a community activist and board member of Mantua Community Developers.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | By Leon Taylor and Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writers
If you thought it was raining hard outside yesterday, you should have seen it inside the Reading Terminal Market in Center City. Parts of the market, at 12th and Arch streets, were flooded with up to five inches of rainwater that had leaked through the roof and floor of the train shed overhead, cascading into the market below. The large puddles forced at least six merchants to close their businesses and kept many shoppers from venturing inside to reach the shops that remained open.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | BY BRIAN RUDNICK
We're marching to City Council today and we're asking the people of this city to join us. We're the merchants of the Reading Terminal Market and we're marching mad. We were promised the sky and we're getting it - soaking filthy rainwater. For several months, we and our customers have endured deafening jackhammering, falling debris and paint chips, cascading water, flooding, mice, city health inspectors, grandstanding politicians and more. It's like the 10 plagues. Take us to the promised land!
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
When Paul Steinke arrived in 2001 to become the new general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, the beloved Philadelphia institution was in need of a delicate update and future vision. To remain relevant, one of the oldest continuously operating public markets in the country had to evolve without losing its diversity or historic character. Thirteen years later, the market has been significantly reshaped by expanded hours, a major redesign, and several bright new tenants. Visitors since 2003 have increased by 30 percent, to 6.2 million people a year.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2000 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by the glitz of the Convention Center, the Reading Terminal Market is struggling to hold on to its character as a farmers' market. It battles the growing perception that it has become just another mall-like food court, said Marcy Rogovin, general manager of Reading Terminal Market Corp. To help in the fight, the venerable market soon will be decorated with 20 handcrafted outdoor signs, at a cost of $100,000, to remind passersby that the place is still what it has always been.
NEWS
November 14, 1987 | By Bob Brecht
With luck, it may turn out that Philadelphia's new Convention Center won't damage "important Philadelphia values" or that it will "enhance and bring to life some of our finest historical monuments" as Edmund N. Bacon asserts (Op-ed Page, Nov. 8). But I'm not betting on it until I've seen some thoughtful planning and careful budgeting to help the historic Reading Terminal Market survive the four-year construction period. I'm one of the merchants there and, so far at least, I haven't heard of a sound plan to help the market make it, period, forget enhancing the neighborhood.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
February 20, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Pho has become a thing, all right. Add a new Lower Northeast Philadelphia branch of South Philadelphia's Pho Ha Saigon to the mix. The new location (575 Adams Ave., 267-538-5600) is a contemporary Vietnamese BYOB with a ballroom-size dining room and an easy-on-the-budget menu of large-portioned dishes as well as the signature soup. A takeout counter is on the way, too. The same family also is behind the two-week-old Pho 20 in Chinatown (234 N. 10th St., 215-413-2020), a more spartan BYOB that replaced the long-running Charles Plaza.
FOOD
February 20, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Eight years ago, Reading Terminal Market restaurateurs George and Kim Mickel joined a mission trip to El Salvador and began a love affair with villagers there whom they now visit annually with food, medicine and supplies. So when space in the center of the market became available last year, they decided to combine two of their passions: providing good food and doing good. The couple behind the Reading Terminal Market stands By George! and Mezze (which they recently closed) have opened Hunger Burger to sell "patties with a purpose.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
IT'S NOT UNUSUAL to see someone reading a book while chowing down at Reading Terminal Market. Now, two is a whole different story - Milton Barham's story. Just as he does most every day at lunch, Barham recently sat at a table inside the bustling market reading two books at once. In his right hand, Barham held John Piper's What Jesus Demands From the World . In his left, Joyce Meyer's Battlefield of the Mind: Winning the Battle in Your Mind . If the two-fisted reader felt the judgmental stares of passers-by, he didn't let on. Same with the snickering and drive-by psychological assessments.
FOOD
February 6, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
For their third stand at Reading Terminal Market, George and Kim Mickel have gone with burgers. Hunger Burger , replacing the Tokyo sushi stand smack in the middle of center court, joins By George, their Italian stand on the Filbert Street side (1990), and Mezze, a Mediterranean takeaway (2003). The name refers more to the Mickels' mission than to a customer's belly. They went to El Salvador with their church to work with King's Castle Ministries, supporting feeding programs.
NEWS
January 30, 2015
IT'S NICE to be recognized. And it's even nicer to recognize what you've already got. If this first month of 2015 is any indication, this will shape up to be the year of the flattering mention, with national publications blaring their editorial trumpets in favor of fair Philadelphia.   The New York Times stuck us at No. 3 on its list of "52 Places to Go in 2015. " We beat out a bunch of stateside and worldwide destinations, edged only by Milan, Italy, and Cuba - not that it's a competition.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
When Paul Steinke arrived in 2001 to become the new general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, the beloved Philadelphia institution was in need of a delicate update and future vision. To remain relevant, one of the oldest continuously operating public markets in the country had to evolve without losing its diversity or historic character. Thirteen years later, the market has been significantly reshaped by expanded hours, a major redesign, and several bright new tenants. Visitors since 2003 have increased by 30 percent, to 6.2 million people a year.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nancy Rose Marie Carolan, 63, of Overbrook Farms, an artist and entrepreneur who helped spark the revival of the Reading Terminal Market, died Wednesday, Sept. 10, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse of acute myeloid leukemia. In 1971, she bought out a former stall owner and created Nancy Carolan's Health Bar. The bar featured fresh-squeezed carrot and spinach juice and macrobiotic staples such as seaweed soup, and brown rice and vegetables. At the time, the 80-year-old market was "half vacant," according to Jonathan Takiff, writing in the Philadelphia Daily News in 1972.
NEWS
September 12, 2014
BASEMENTS, basically by definition, are the ugly and unloved stepchildren of any tiered structure. A damp, dank place to stack cardboard boxes full of ex-lovers' stuff. A resting place for never-used exercise equipment. A sunlight-free ecosystem perfect for the cultivation of cobwebs and dust bunnies. An eminently unsafe hiding place for psychotic clowns armed with blood-stained garden equipment. (Just me?) But none of these subterranean stereotypes, even the totally rational killer-clown one, apply to what lies beneath the Reading Terminal Market, one of Philadelphia's most recognized historical and culinary contributions.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
NBC10'S DEANNA DURANTE is a mom again. The reporter, along with husband, Tim Swan , welcomed Mattax McQuain Swan, a/k/a Mattie, in the wee hours of yesterday morning. The 7-pound, 14-ounce Mattie joins 2-year-old Maya in the Durante-Swan clan. Both mom and baby are doing swimmingly.   'Man'-ly red carpet Michael Ealy and Megan Good , the stars of "Think Like a Man Too," will walk the red carpet at the Prince Music Theater (1412 Chestnut St.)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
THE PREVAILING narrative about Jason Mott is that he's an overnight success. Mott's debut novel, The Returned - about people who mysteriously return from the dead and the reaction to their reappearance - was adapted into the hit ABC TV series "Resurrection. " But that story doesn't include the five manuscripts Mott shopped around before The Returned hit it big, or Mott's tenure as a Verizon customer-service rep after graduating from the creative-writing program at the University of North Carolina, which allowed him to work days and write at night.
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