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Reagan Administration

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NEWS
October 30, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / REBECCA BARGER
Flipping burgers - that's the only kind of job left for some workers to do today, say some former Budd Co. employees. A number of them and their spouses gathered across from the now-closed Red Lion Road Budd plant Wednesday to try to make a political point: That there has been a loss of manufacturing jobs under the Reagan administration and that people, therefore, should vote for Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
With the rejection of Robert H. Bork's nomination to the Supreme Court, the administration's leading candidates are five men in their 50s who were named to the federal appeals bench by Republican Presidents Reagan, Ford or Nixon, according to White House and Justice Department sources. All are conservative jurists, but none appears to be as controversial as Bork. The Justice Department, which has prepared a short list of candidates for White House examination, favors Judges J. Clifford Wallace of San Diego; Pasco M. Bowman 2d of Kansas City, Mo., and Anthony M. Kennedy of Sacramento, Calif.
NEWS
February 24, 1986 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Oh, to be a fly on the Oval Office wall! Even while history is being made in the Philippines, the priority concern of the Reagan administration must be how to claim credit for it. The White House brain trust will work overtime on this project, knowing there's a rung at the top of the totem pole for the strategist who comes up with the most plausible reason why the fall of President Ferdinand Marcos should be seen as a triumph for Ronald Reagan's...
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | BY MATTHEW BARAKAT, Associated Press
ARLINGTON, VA. - The 18 million passengers who travel in and out of the nation's capital through Reagan National Airport each year will now be greeted by a 9-foot tall, nearly $1 million bronze statue of the former president that was unveiled yesterday. The statue is the fourth dedicated by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation this year to commemorate the 100th anniversary of his birth. The foundation operates his presidential library. Yesterday's unveiling also gave travelers an opportunity to revisit the dormant debate over whether Reagan was worthy of having his name put on the airport that had long been known simply as "National.
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | BY ADRIAN LEE
The Iranian arms deals and the diversion of yet undetermined profits to the Contras involve basic White House concepts that Ronald Reagan feels passionately about - so passionately that the whole "scandal," as the liberals like to call it, becomes a study in emotions and commitment. Insisting that the Iran affair equates with Watergate, the liberal community, its inside-the-Beltway news media chapter in particular, makes a fundamental mistake. Where Watergate originated with an extraneous happening, a two-bit burglary nobody wanted to own up to, the Iran tradeoff, arms for hostages, involves the very fabric of the Reagan Administration - concepts Reagan will defend to the uttermost, in a mano y mano war to the knife.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | By MICHAEL KINSLEY, From the New Republic
"There was no connection between these two releases," said President Reagan about the swap of Nicholas Daniloff for Gennadi Zakharov. He added, regarding the Iceland summit, "This is not a summit. " Everyone was amused by these two obvious lies. Only conservatives were fuming that Reagan should agree to meet with a man who had challenged his "personal assurance" that Daniloff was not a spy. William Safire called this "the most far-reaching, calculated personal insult ever delivered to an American president by a Soviet leader . . . Mr. Gorbachev in effect called him a liar.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | By SUSAN BENNETT, Daily News Staff Writer
President Reagan plans to spend the afternoon in Philadelphia addressing two widely disparate controversies: AIDS and the bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution. Previously criticized for not addressing the spreading AIDS epidemic, Reagan was scheduled during an appearance before the College of Physicians of Philadelphia to make his second public pronouncement in as many days on acquired immune deficiency syndrome. "We want an all-out campaign," Reagan said last night, responding to reporters' questions at a state dinner for visiting Prime Minister Jacques Chirac of France.
NEWS
October 13, 1986 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
By now you've probably read reams about how the Reagan administration has stomped all over the spirit of the First Amendment by feeding disinformation to a sadly gullible member of the working news media. Considering the mischief wrought, stomped is probably too mild a verb. As is that clinical-sounding term, disinformation. In their zeal to get self-serving, flat-out lies passed on to the public under the heading of legitimate news, Reagan's media-manipulators have performed clog dances, polkas, zapateados, horas and reels over your constitutional right to unadulterated reporting by a free press.
NEWS
October 26, 1988 | BY GEORGE OVITT JR
In a nationally-syndicated column, former Reagan speech writer Patrick Buchanan has proclaimed the Reagan presidency a triumphant success and suggested that President Reagan be viewed as the "man of the decade. " Buchanan cites prosperity, job creation, peace and a resurgent America as evidence of Reagan's effectiveness in office. There is, of course, another Reagan record, one that we would do well to consider as the November elections approach: Since 1979, 84 percent of job growth has been in the lowest paying industries (retail trade and service sectors)
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | BY JESSE L. JACKSON
Conventional wisdom suggests that Ronald Reagan and George Bush are two different political animals. That wisdom contends that Reagan was the ideologue, and Bush is the practical politician. Reagan liked the politics of confrontation. Bush prefers the politics of negotiation. Reagan did not study the issues, avoided the press and was administratively disengaged. Bush does his homework, meets often with the press and runs his administration. That is the consensus. But most of that has to do with style, approach and work habits, not substance.
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NEWS
April 22, 2012 | Freelance
Reagan and Thatcher The Difficult Relationship By Richard Aldous W.W. Norton & Company. 342 pp. $27.95 Reviewed by John Rossi Otto von Bismarck, who forged a united German nation from an array of German-speaking states in the late 19th century, once observed that the key to the 20th century would be that Americans spoke English. The so-called "special relationship" between the two largest branches of the English-speaking world proved decisive in two world wars.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | BY MATTHEW BARAKAT, Associated Press
ARLINGTON, VA. - The 18 million passengers who travel in and out of the nation's capital through Reagan National Airport each year will now be greeted by a 9-foot tall, nearly $1 million bronze statue of the former president that was unveiled yesterday. The statue is the fourth dedicated by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation this year to commemorate the 100th anniversary of his birth. The foundation operates his presidential library. Yesterday's unveiling also gave travelers an opportunity to revisit the dormant debate over whether Reagan was worthy of having his name put on the airport that had long been known simply as "National.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Robert E. Baker Jr., a former Conrail executive with a background in transportation, labor and international trade, has been appointed to lead the Ridge administration's southeast regional office. Baker, 50, who will be based in Philadelphia, will serve as Ridge's liaison to seven southeast counties, including Philadelphia and its four suburban counties. Baker spent eight years as an assistant vice president for state and local affairs with Conrail in Philadelphia before he was named managing director of HMS Public Affairs in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | By ACEL MOORE
After five days of hearings by the Senate Judiciary Committee it looks as though Judge Clarence Thomas has passed the muster of his interrogators. Even his most ardent detractors are conceding his approval by the Senate Judiciary Committee. What is left in the proceedings is to hear from other witnesses. And barring some stunning and unexpected evidence that suggests he is not qualified to sit on the court, Thomas most likely will be voted out of committee with a clear majority.
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | BY JESSE L. JACKSON
Conventional wisdom suggests that Ronald Reagan and George Bush are two different political animals. That wisdom contends that Reagan was the ideologue, and Bush is the practical politician. Reagan liked the politics of confrontation. Bush prefers the politics of negotiation. Reagan did not study the issues, avoided the press and was administratively disengaged. Bush does his homework, meets often with the press and runs his administration. That is the consensus. But most of that has to do with style, approach and work habits, not substance.
NEWS
July 25, 1989 | By PATRICK J. BUCHANAN
Here's the conclusion from Bob Schieffer's new book, The Acting President: Ronald Reagan and the Supporting Players Who Helped Him Create the Illusion That Held America Spellbound. " . . . Ronald Reagan had little to do with his Administration and the issues that came before it. No matter whose name had been on the marquee, when the Reagan Administration was at its best it had been people like (James) Baker and (Richard) Darman who had kept the White House running. " This is the new party line in the capital city.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sure, the Republicans are having a little get-together in Washington this week, but do you think all of the city cares if George Bush's speech is under 15 minutes or Barbara's pearls are real? We're talking about a town that is 80 percent Democratic and home to 3,000 of the most pernicious folks known to the Grand Old Party - card-carrying members of the American Civil Liberties Union. In the wake of $1,500 dinners, boot-stompin' Texans, nouvelle society New Yorkers, Skull and Bones Brahmins and limo gridlock, what is a good liberal to do?
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / REBECCA BARGER
Flipping burgers - that's the only kind of job left for some workers to do today, say some former Budd Co. employees. A number of them and their spouses gathered across from the now-closed Red Lion Road Budd plant Wednesday to try to make a political point: That there has been a loss of manufacturing jobs under the Reagan administration and that people, therefore, should vote for Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis.
NEWS
October 26, 1988 | BY GEORGE OVITT JR
In a nationally-syndicated column, former Reagan speech writer Patrick Buchanan has proclaimed the Reagan presidency a triumphant success and suggested that President Reagan be viewed as the "man of the decade. " Buchanan cites prosperity, job creation, peace and a resurgent America as evidence of Reagan's effectiveness in office. There is, of course, another Reagan record, one that we would do well to consider as the November elections approach: Since 1979, 84 percent of job growth has been in the lowest paying industries (retail trade and service sectors)
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The House yesterday overwhelmingly approved legislation that would restrict the amount of commercial time television stations can broadcast during children's shows. The bill, which passed 328-78, would require TV stations to reduce the advertising on programs specially designed for children under 12 years to 10.5 minutes an hour on weekends and 12 minutes on weekdays, essentially reimposing standards that were repealed in 1984. The bill now goes to the Senate, where House sponsors believe it stands a good chance of passage.
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