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Reagan Democrats

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NEWS
May 5, 1988 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Hilary Spink, 75, a retired school custodian, squinted in the sun outside School 67, the polling place for his poor but tidy working-class neighborhood on the city's west side. He was explaining why he and his wife, Ruth, voted for Ronald Reagan in 1980 and 1984 but plan to vote in November for Democrat Michael S. Dukakis instead of Republican George Bush. "We thought (Jimmy) Carter was making a mess of things so we voted for Reagan," said Spink. "Then we stuck with Reagan in 1984.
NEWS
July 18, 1992 | By Katharine Seelye, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Inquirer staff writer Dwight Ott and correspondent Lem Lloyd contributed to this article
If Bill Clinton is looking for Reagan Democrats, he came to the right place when he came to Coatesville. Butch and Kathy Franciscus, Democrats who haven't voted their party in the last few presidential elections, came out last night to take a gander at the new Democrat who has soared 30 points in the opinion polls almost overnight. Butch, 51, a roofer, said he liked George Bush's strong defense posture, but Clinton caught his eye with his proposal for welfare reform. Kathy, 49, a secretary, feels the same way. "I believe in helping them," she said of people on welfare, "but they should do something back.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Washington Bureau
As they consider how to position themselves for the future, the Democrats will be walking a delicate racial tightrope. They must figure out how to ease concerns among some white voters that the national Democratic Party is too sympathetic to blacks, while simultaneously convincing black voters that their loyal support over the years is not being taken for granted. The problem may be aggravated by the visibility that Jesse Jackson, who stirs strong emotions pro and con, is likely to have in the coming months - when he may look like the party's only true national leader and its leading candidate for 1992.
NEWS
September 3, 1988 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
One of Jesse Jackson's most influential supporters said yesterday that there is a "pretty serious" rift between Jackson and Democratic presidential nominee Michael S. Dukakis, and a Jackson spokesman confirmed what he called "a failure to communicate" between the former rivals. The spokesman called for a new summit meeting between Dukakis and Jackson to define Jackson's role in the Democratic presidential campaign. "Jackson has said, 'I will campaign on demand,' " said his press secretary, Frank Watkins.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | by John B. Judis, New York Times
Since 1968, there has been much talk of a "Republican realignment. " Quieted by Bill Clinton's victory in 1992, it resounds again after last week's Republican victories. This election may in fact hail the emergence of a 20-year Republican lock on the presidency, Congress and the statehouses. But it is more likely to usher in an era of greater political turbulence characterized by empty sloganeering, mean-spirited campaigning and the growth of local and national third parties.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The mighty coalition of Republicans, independents and disaffected Democrats that put Republican presidents in the White House in five of the last six elections appears to be falling apart. George Bush's plunge in popularity and the amazing surge of Ross Perot have shattered, at least for now, the Republican Party's 25-year-old dream of becoming the dominant party in America. "Thirty to 40 percent of the Republican coalition is in some degree of revolt," said political analyst Kevin Phillips, whose 1969 book, The Emerging Republican Majority, outlined the political shift that elected Richard M. Nixon, Ronald Reagan and Bush.
NEWS
October 4, 1988 | By Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
Jesse Jackson held a rolling revival meeting for votes here yesterday, delivering fiery orations designed to get the black community interested in presidential politics again. In a whirlwind tour of the city, Jackson talked to about 300 young people at a rally in West Philadelphia, greeted commuters at Olney Terminal and tried to energize about 50 ministers and elected officials at Bright Hope Baptist Church in North Philadelphia. The message was clear: Blacks have an important stake in who wins this election.
NEWS
February 18, 1996 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Say you're shopping for a Republican candidate and want to find the true conservative in the crowd. So you start by scanning the campaign slogans on display in the New Hampshire primary. Bob Dole bills himself as "a proven conservative. " Pat Buchanan offers "a new conservatism of the heart. " Lamar Alexander pitches "a conservative vision for America. " Steve Forbes is simply "Conservative for President. " Which guy is the real article? Actually, each can lay justifiable claim to the conservative label - and that's important, considering the nature of the electorate in the first-in-the-nation New Hampshire primary.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | by Ishmael Reed, From the New York Times
When President Clinton speaks at black and Latino churches about escalating violence in their communities, on the face of it this effort to reach out would seem to be a compassionate gesture. I voted for Clinton because I believed that he was capable of compassion. But when I read that Stanley Greenberg, Clinton's pollster, approved of these appearances, I became suspicious. According to news reports, Greenberg was in part responsible for the episode during the presidential campaign in which Clinton publicly scolded Jesse Jackson for inviting the rap artist Sister Souljah to appear before a meeting of the Rainbow Coalition after she rapped some lyrics that some interpreted as anti-white.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | TED VAN DYK, From the New York Times
With style and shrewdness, Gov. Bill Clinton appears to have beaten the rap on his philandering and emerged stronger than he was before the Gennifer Flowers episode came up. Unless a second shoe (or bedroom slipper) drops to indicate he's a liar, his national exposure during his troubles has helped establish him more clearly as the Democrats' front-runner and likely nominee. Now he faces a real challenge: to move beyond poll-driven boilerplate to presentation of a strong, relevant agenda that will genuinely address the country's problems and give voters a real reason to elect him. Clinton enters the New Hampshire primary homestretch with far more money and a stronger organization than his competitors.
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NEWS
January 17, 2014
New Jersey Democrats coined the word Christiecrat a few years ago to insult other Democrats deemed suspiciously close to the Republican governor. Later, Gov. Christie's reelection campaign encouraged the term's use to describe the Democratic voters it was proud to have won over - supposed successors to the Reagan Democrats and a key part of the case for Christie's trans-partisan presidential candidacy. Now, as investigators dissect a punitive traffic jam apparently orchestrated by Christie operatives, Christiecrat is accidentally apt for another reason: It captures the dark side of the administration's vision of a state divided between Team Christie and everyone else.
NEWS
August 31, 2012
AS FAR AS epiphanies go, it wasn't as dramatic as St. Paul getting knocked off of his horse on the road to Damascus, Joan of Arc hearing voices in France or Joseph Smith getting a visit from Jesus in upstate New York. But even though my kitchen table in Havertown is a fairly humble locale, something momentous did happen Wednesday night. And while I don't plan on leading any armies against the British in the near future, it had a lasting impact on at least one person. Thirty-three years ago, when I turned 18, I marched myself down to the Media courthouse and registered as a Democrat.
NEWS
October 27, 2008 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With voter registration favoring Democrats and polls predicting a blowout victory for Barack Obama in New Jersey, it would be understandable if the state's Democratic machine were shut down and Republicans were switching the conversation to: "How 'bout those Phillies?" But New Jersey Democrats are keeping busy, exporting party workers to neighboring states - especially Pennsylvania, which is a battleground in the Nov. 4 presidential election. And Republicans are not about to give up. They are narrowing their focus to swing voters - the Reagan Democrats who live in 55 swing towns around the state, including Washington Township in Gloucester County.
NEWS
April 3, 2008 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He sipped a Yuengling in Latrobe; fiddled with a Slinky in Johnstown; tasted a chili dog and bowled a 37 in Altoona; fed a calf in State College; sampled homemade chocolates in Lititz; toured a garment factory in Allentown; and nibbled on cheese at Philadelphia's Italian Market. Along the way Sen. Barack Obama introduced himself at town-hall meetings and informal visits to local haunts during a six-day tour across Pennsylvania that ended last night. Obama made populist appeals to the working-class voters who have have been hesitant to support him in other states, hoping to cut into Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's lead ahead of Pennsylvania's April 22 Democratic primary.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2004 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Minutes before Ronald Reagan was shot in an attempted assassination in 1981, hundreds of union leaders did something few might believe today. They gave Reagan raucous applause at their annual Building and Constructions Trades union meeting at the Washington Hilton. "He received one of the longest ovations. It was an aw-shucks speech," said Patrick Gillespie, business manager of the Philadelphia Building Trades Council, who was there that day. "The fact is, people liked Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | By Alvin S. Felzenberg
Democrats think they have found a way to transcend the schizophrenia that characterized their convention: They will present their tired, shopworn message through more likable messengers. They are gambling that voters will fall so in love with their newest national figure that they will not listen too closely to what he says. That strategy was much in evidence in Sen. Joseph Lieberman's eloquent and stunning vice presidential acceptance speech Wednesday night. Lieberman's talk was appealing not for what he said but for who he is: the son of hard-working immigrants, a good and decent man, a person of faith, and the first Jew to join a national ticket.
NEWS
March 21, 2000 | by Michael Kinsley
When Ted Kennedy failed to pry the 1980 Democratic presidential nomination away from incumbent Jimmy Carter, he declared, "The dream will never die," and it was pretty clear what he meant. When Bill Bradley gave up his challenge to Al Gore for that same honor, he declared, "We have been defeated, but the cause for which I ran has not been. " I don't have a clue what he was talking about. Was it health-care reform? That is what he pushed in the campaign, but it's an issue he never made much of until then.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | By Acel Moore
Even though I hear my colleagues and fellow pundits talk about how exciting the Republican primary race between Arizona Sen. John McCain and Texas Gov. George W. Bush has become, I don't get the same emotional charge. Sure, on a purely intellectual level, McCain's upset of Bush in Michigan and decisive victory in McCain's home state on Tuesday certainly make the contest a horse race, but the appeal of the candidates thus far has been directed primarily at white voters. My colleagues are excited because there were record voter turnouts in the Republican primaries in South Carolina and Michigan.
NEWS
October 5, 1999 | By Lenora B. Fulani
Many things stunned the political establishment about my meeting with Pat Buchanan to discuss his interest in the Reform Party nomination for president. Buchanan is a right-winger; I come from the left. Buchanan has been criticized for being racist. I'm black. Buchanan is a lifelong Republican, a consummate political insider. I am the ultimate outsider, an African American independent at odds with the black leadership's insistence that we stick to the Democrats for our political and economic survival.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Among the lessons of Tuesday's voting is how difficult it is in modern-day Pennsylvania for an eastern Democrat to win statewide. Devon attorney Joe Kohn learned the hard way what Philadelphians Ed Rendell, Dwight Evans, Allyson Schwartz and others looking at statewide runs in the future might want to consider: Democratic voters in western Pennsylvania are critical to winning, but are not necessarily friendly to Democrats from the east....
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