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NEWS
October 23, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
LEONARD WARREN Simpkins Jr. would be cooking a meal or riding in his car and the muted trumpet of Miles Davis would be filling the air with jazz. Leonard was a big jazz fan and the late trumpeter was his favorite, although he also dug John Coltrane, Wes Montgomery and Charlie Parker, among others. And he didn't just listen to their music. He had firm opinions about the artists - which ones were the best and why, which ones mediocre - as well as an encyclopedic knowledge of their work.
NEWS
December 14, 2012
DEAR HARRY: I have a good pension plan where I work, and I have been contributing right up to the maximum allowed. The company matches my contributions up to 6 percent of my pay. Today, I saw some guru on TV telling people that any money above what the company will match should go into real estate. He was even going to the point of telling viewers to move to a bigger home with a bigger mortgage. With low interest rates and the threat of inflationary policies in Washington, he insisted that this was a no-brainer.
NEWS
August 25, 1995 | by Jacqueline Love, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Earni Young contributed to this story
Want to buy a house? Need advice on what to do now that you're moving for the first time? If so, the answers can be as close as your personal computer. Log on and link up to the LibertyNet, where cyberspace meets real estate. LibertyNet is a regional computer-based network with information about lots of things - community organizations, educational institutions, historic and cultural attractions, local government and business in the Philadelphia region. And real estate.
NEWS
September 5, 2000 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Selling a house can be like losing an old friend. The attachment between home and homeowner can run that deep because of the sense of history and familiarity. And when the owner is an older person and the history spans decades, the loss can be quite painful, real-estate agents say. Jean Brenner of Richboro, who has sold real estate for 23 years, knows this from personal experience. After selling her home of 18 years, she found herself getting weepy all the time. "I was depressed but didn't know why," Brenner said.
NEWS
June 29, 2007 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a stunning move linked to a federal investigation, Vernon W. Hill II is leaving Commerce Bancorp Inc., which he founded more than 30 years ago and built into a $47 billion bank that helped change the face of retail banking. The Cherry Hill bank said today that Hill, 61, would immediately depart from its main operating subsidiary and would retire as chairman, president and chief executive of Commerce Bancorp on July 31. Commerce stock climbed on the news, as investors placed bets that the company will be sold.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Flora K. Rubin cannot stand inertia. That's why she teaches ethics to real-estate agents, sells about $8 million worth of real estate a year, and works on a task force that is proposing revisions in real-estate law. It's also one reason why the Pennsylvania Association of Realtors recently chose Rubin, of Narberth, for its 1993 Outstanding Service Award. "She doesn't recognize the words, 'It can't be done,' " said Rubin's friend and colleague, Carolyn Eagan. It was Eagan, executive vice president of the Main Line Board of Realtors, who submitted Rubin's name to the 26,000-member state association for consideration for the award.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1992 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
When the Berlin Wall came tumbling down more than two years ago, followed by the Soviet Union, Binswanger Co. saw a golden opportunity in the rush by American firms to consolidate and relocate their European operations. After a six-month test, the Philadelphia-based firm and Auguste-Thouard of Paris yesterday formally announced the formation of Auguste-Thouard- Binswanger, which will provide international real-estate services. The partnership with France's largest commercial real-estate brokerage is unique, said Frank G. Binswanger 3rd, who has been named a managing director of the new venture.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
The opening of a new RE/MAX franchise real-estate office at 1001 Baltimore Pike in Springfield has been announced by Michael J. Stefonick, regional director of RE/MAX of Southeastern Pennsylvania. The Springfield office - operating under the name RE/MAX Delco - is the 46th franchise in the Southeastern Pennsylvania regional group. The franchise is owned by Paul V. Kazunas. The 4,500-square-foot office employs seven sales associates. Projections call for the addition of about 15 associates within nine months, according to Kazunas.
REAL_ESTATE
July 17, 1986 | By LEW SICHELMAN, Special to the Daily News
Two years ago Clark Firestone, an old buddy from my high- school days, was like a lot of would-be real-estate investors. He had heard about people who made fortunes in real estate while sheltering a good bit of their incomes, and he wanted to do the same. But he was scared to death. Today, Firestone and nine of his friends and neighbors are in the process of purchasing their 10th property. When the deal goes to settlement in the next few weeks, they'll own about $500,000 worth of real estate between them.
NEWS
March 27, 1987 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Gary Thompson also contributed to this report.)
The biggest "if" in Mayor Goode's proposed $1.8 billion budget has real- estate developers and investors coming up with a few "ifs" of their own. Goode's plan to sell two city office buildings - City Hall Annex and the Municipal Services Building - for $65 million and lease them back for $14 million a year is the biggest link in the fiscal chain that would keep taxes and services where they are. But several developers said they'd rather knock...
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REAL_ESTATE
April 20, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The following is a no-holds-barred discussion of self-defense techniques. Or, as Israeli Krav Maga instructor Don Melnick puts it, "Get over the 'ick' factor in eye-gouging. " "This is not fluff or a demonstration of skills," but a "real-world way to save your life," says Melnick, who has trained in Israel four times. "Krav Maga is not a strength-on-strength [approach], but techniques. " It's a cold afternoon in Cherry Hill, and 14 real estate agents from Camden and Burlington Counties are lined up in four rows facing Melnick, who begins "awareness training" - the No. 1 aspect of Krav Maga, which in Hebrew means contact combat . Krav Maga is used by the Israeli Defense Forces as well as by police in many countries and by FBI agents.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
First-quarter average home values in Philadelphia declined 4 percent from the last three months of 2013 as the city's real estate market recovery continued to experience "fits and starts," economist Kevin Gillen, who tracks the market, said Monday. In his analysis of home sales recorded during the first quarter, Gillen, senior consultant at the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government, said the recovery has been "unevenly - and inequitably - spread across" the city's neighborhoods.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara L. Greenfield, 82, a grand dame of Philadelphia real estate and a tireless worker for civic causes, died Sunday, April 6, of cardiovascular complications at her Philadelphia home. During a career that spanned 50 years, Mrs. Greenfield was one of the leading real estate sales and listing agents for high-end residential properties in Center City. She started out as a broker for Greenfield Realty Co., the firm founded by her late husband, Albert M. Jr. Later, she moved to Albert M. Greenfield & Co., founded by her father-in-law and now operated by her oldest son, Albert M. III. Both firms are in Philadelphia.
REAL_ESTATE
March 30, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
It was an Easter Sunday in the late 1990s that happened to fall in April, a couple weeks after the old start of daylight saving time. The day was dark and cloudy, and it began snowing heavily about 7 p.m. "That's the good thing about daylight savings time," my wife said, looking out the living room window. "There's now enough light to see the snow falling. " It had been a bad winter that year - though not as bad as the one that officially just ended. Coming off two very mild winters made this winter worse, especially for real estate agents and builders.
REAL_ESTATE
March 3, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A visitor was asking Toll Bros. CEO Douglas Yearley about the location of property in another state. Instead of trying to describe it, Yearley called to his assistant and asked her to get Google Earth up and running in the conference room where he and the visitor were sitting. In an instant, Yearley was able to click his mouse a couple of times, and the location, including a tennis court, was clearly in view - yet another example of how technology has transformed, and continues to change, the way builders and real estate agents do business day to day. Obviously, as marketing director George Polgar of Local Development Co. in Northern Liberties emphasized, finding and acquiring locations for residential, commercial and industrial development "still requires a street-level knowledge of places where growth is likely.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Jerry Iannelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Generous to a fault, Edward Aaron Rab would frequently leave his dentistry office with baskets of peaches in his arms. "A lot of his clients were farmers," son Gary said. "Often they couldn't pay their dental bills, so they worked out some sort of barter system. They'd pay him in produce. " Dr. Rab, 89, of Lindenwold, a World War II veteran, dentist, and real estate developer, died Saturday, Feb. 22, of dementia in Boca Raton, Fla., to which he retired in 2012. Born inside a Philadelphia trolley car in 1924, he spent the 1930s in Lakewood, N.J., where his father owned a military-surplus store.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014
WHO NEEDS to sell CDs and downloads when you can strike gold in a real-estate deal gone bad? The New York Post 's Page Six reports that popstress Rihanna has won a multimillion-dollar settlement after some lousy advice from her former accountant left her with a mere $2 million in cash on hand. Filing suit under her real name, Robyn Fenty, in 2012, the singer claimed that bean counter Peter Gounis and the firm Berdon LLP okeydokey'd her purchase of a $7 million Southern California house despite the fact that she was "bleeding cash" in 2009, the year the deal was closed.
REAL_ESTATE
February 16, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
You want to sell your house. What must you do first? Call Uncle Joe, an excellent plumber and avid HGTV fan, to get his opinion on your house's value. Surf the Web for the names of three Realtors. Choose one who will list your home at the highest price, with assurances that he'll keep it there if you insist. Do your homework on which questions you should ask a Realtor. Then call a non-invested professional, such as your accountant or financial adviser, for three names. And interview them.
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Walter Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawrence Lee, 54, of Gloucester Township, who retired as a real estate agent in Marlton in 2002, died of kidney failure Tuesday, Feb. 11, at home. A 1977 graduate of Central High School in Philadelphia, Mr. Lee earned a bachelor's degree in political science at Temple University in 1981 while working in restaurants to pay for his education. "He had worked in the restaurant business from when he was a small child," always, as the saying goes, "at the front of the house," his son, Lawrence Jr., said.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack R. Loew, 66, of West Chester, a suburban real estate developer and philanthropist, died Wednesday, Jan. 29, of brain cancer at his home. Mr. Loew spent the early part of his career designing and manufacturing interior cabins for passenger trains. But he wanted to do something community-based. So he focused on the acquisition and development of land, and in 1976 founded Hough/Loew & Associates, which at first offered design-to-construction services. "It was one-stop shopping," said his wife, Patricia Burton Loew.
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