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Real Estate Market

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NEWS
November 11, 1990 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
As it is elsewhere in the region, the inventory of unsold houses in South Jersey is expanding. The buyers are getting finicky, if not scarce. The region's economy is flirting with recession. People who want to move up are having a hard time moving out. All this and Saddam Hussein too. Yes, like the national economy, the local home-sale market can be affected by global imponderables. A protracted crisis in the Persian Gulf could further undermine consumer confidence and keep away home buyers.
REAL_ESTATE
August 17, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Renting can set you free. I'm quoting part of a conclusion by Jed Kolko, chief economist of the real estate search engine Trulia. The full quote: "Homeownership may have many advantages, but renting might make it easier to cut housing costs if it suddenly becomes necessary. That's an important way that renting can set you free. " Since the housing bubble burst, residential real estate has shifted in favor of rentals, at least in the short term, Moody's Analytics chief economist Mark Zandi noted recently.
REAL_ESTATE
October 21, 1990 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anyone acquainted with the present can appreciate the theme adopted for the city Board of Realtors' annual real estate fair - "Philadelphia: Future Positive. " These days, houses can be as hard to sell as the city's bonds. So torpid is the Philadelphia real estate market that board president Allan Domb recently was moved to break something of an unwritten rule among Realtors. No matter how bad things get, Realtors try mightily to remain upbeat. At least publicly. Slow market?
REAL_ESTATE
July 22, 1990 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
It's feast or famine at the Jersey shore as the summer season approaches the midpoint. The feast is the selection of houses on sale as last year's listings remain on the market along with this year's new ones. The famine is the selection of rental properties for the rest of the season. Except for Atlantic City's island neighbors, rentals and sales have rebounded from the dismal levels of 1989, according to real estate agents. But sales still haven't returned to the levels of the boom years of the mid-1980s.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. When the housing bubble exploded in 2007, it ripped away nearly 25 percent of the value of Bristol Township's homes. For many in this Bucks County community, short sales and foreclosures followed, slowly and painfully, over the next five years. Veteran Coldwell Banker Hearthside agent Ellen M. Cassidy, who has been selling homes here for three decades, offers this welcome news: The real estate market has started to improve.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
It's a largely untapped market Realtors can only dream about: more than 80 million Americans ages 20 to 34, prime time for starting families and moving into their first homes. The youthful answer to the industry's prayers in a home-sale market recovering too slowly. Though Realtors and builders have their money riding on a bounce in 2015, they are acknowledging that most so-called millennials can neither afford houses nor want to buy them. Many millennials look at a house as "something you can get underwater on debt with and burn your fingers on if its value goes south," said Kevin Gillen, chief economist of Meyers Research and senior research fellow at Drexel's Lindy Institute for Urban Innovation, who tracks the Philadelphia region's real estate market.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / ROGER TUNIS
A hot time at the Red Ball Gala helped bring down Bucks Fever Saturday night in Doylestown. The finale involved more than dining and dancing, though: There was a dramatic reading of Pearl S. Buck's "The New Year" on Sunday, hosted by David and Julie Nixon Eisenhower. All of which led chairman Ron Watson to conclude that "there is something hot about Bucks County beyond the real estate market. "
BUSINESS
October 20, 1989 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
First Fidelity Bancorp. yesterday reported a 24 percent decline in third- quarter profits because of $96 million in bad real estate loans made by its New Jersey bank subsidiaries. The company, parent of Philadelphia's Fidelity Bank, said the $96 million was owed by two national borrowers and a New Jersey commercial-real estate customer. The quarterly earnings decline was attributed to First Fidelity's assessment that the three borrowers could not meet their interest payments.
NEWS
April 29, 2009 | By Gregory Heller
City Council has been debating the fate of Philadelphia's 10-year property-tax abatement on new and rehabilitated residential construction. Supporters of the tax break argue that it was an important force in stimulating the city's real-estate boom. Detractors say it's an expensive giveaway that mainly benefits people buying luxury homes. City Council is considering a bill that would restrict the tax abatement to buildings that have obtained the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)
NEWS
September 20, 2013
MINUTES before 2 a.m. on Sept. 15, 2008, Lehman Brothers became the biggest U.S. company ever to file for bankruptcy. The collapse of this New York investment bank five years ago touched off a panic that sent the stock market down - and the housing market down and out for years. A bubble in the real-estate market, after inflating for a decade, went pop. Values plunged for the most important investment held by everyday Americans as housing suffered its worst implosion since the Great Depression.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
July 26, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. There is more than a hint of change in Norristown's real estate market. It can be very subtle, like a sprinkle of cinnamon on a cappuccino at Jus' Java on Main Street. It can be loud, like the arrival of the 7:27 a.m. Manayunk-Norristown train, or construction on the Lafayette Street corridor that will, by 2020, finally link the community with the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Norristown, the borough urges, is "Where You Belong," and developers and real estate agents say it is committed to making that happen after decades of neglect and false starts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
There's nothing fancy about the ensemble of redbrick houses that line the 3600 block of Lancaster Avenue in Powelton Village. Built in the late 1870s, when the avenue linked country farms to city markets, the modest, wood-trimmed buildings housed working people who tended shops on the ground floor. Folks still live upstairs today, and neighborhood businesses - bike store, nail salon, day-care center - still pepper the storefronts below. Such blocks are what make Philadelphia, well, Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. When the housing bubble exploded in 2007, it ripped away nearly 25 percent of the value of Bristol Township's homes. For many in this Bucks County community, short sales and foreclosures followed, slowly and painfully, over the next five years. Veteran Coldwell Banker Hearthside agent Ellen M. Cassidy, who has been selling homes here for three decades, offers this welcome news: The real estate market has started to improve.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
It's a largely untapped market Realtors can only dream about: more than 80 million Americans ages 20 to 34, prime time for starting families and moving into their first homes. The youthful answer to the industry's prayers in a home-sale market recovering too slowly. Though Realtors and builders have their money riding on a bounce in 2015, they are acknowledging that most so-called millennials can neither afford houses nor want to buy them. Many millennials look at a house as "something you can get underwater on debt with and burn your fingers on if its value goes south," said Kevin Gillen, chief economist of Meyers Research and senior research fellow at Drexel's Lindy Institute for Urban Innovation, who tracks the Philadelphia region's real estate market.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities.   East Bradford Township is "one of the most desirable places to live in Chester County," says Kit Anstey, of Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Fox & Roach Realtors. He should know: It has been his home for 40 years. To be honest, Anstey's connections here go back three years more, to 1972, "when I joined the Radley Run Country Club. " He has owned two houses in his time in East Bradford, which is west of West Chester but east of West Bradford Township.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. Horsham is "a little different market" when compared with surrounding communities, veteran real estate agent Gary Segal says. For one thing, he notes, even in the off-season that runs from just before Thanksgiving to a week after Super Bowl Sunday, the market here is "fairly hot. " Says Segal: "I sold a couple of real good ones" - including newly constructed houses, which command the top prices in any market - "that brought the second-highest price in Horsham this year to a [relocation]
BUSINESS
January 12, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities.   Like love and marriage, West Goshen and West Chester go together like a horse and carriage. It's not that West Goshen Township, which surrounds the Chester County seat, can't stand on its own. It's simply that West Chester's growing restaurant scene and other amenities have made it a destination for those living in the towns nearby. The fact that West Goshen is just minutes away from the borough's downtown gives its residents a head start on parking.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Sustained recovery continues to elude the real estate market, and policymakers are turning for help once again to the lower-income, first-time home buyer. The latest step, announced by President Obama on Thursday, is the Federal Housing Administration's reduction, by a half-percentage point, of the annual insurance premium on a 30-year mortgage with a down payment of less than 5 percent. FHA says the average annual savings, $900, will push 250,000 more first-timers into home ownership.
NEWS
September 20, 2014
ISSUE | DEATH PENALTY Misplaced mercy It is appalling how many tears are wasted on this filth ("Rethink executions," Sept. 17). How about giving the same respect to the victims and their families by mentioning names, ages, and the nature of the crime in editorials and letters? Oh, and what sentence would you recommend to the jury for the convicted murderer who killed you? |Edward Rock, Collingswood Leave cell door ajar Life without parole is called death by incarceration, and it precludes redemption ("Rethink executions," Sept.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. Before we pull into Parkesburg on Amtrak's Keystone Service to Harrisburg, here's a trivia question: In what movie did this Chester County borough's train station play a small, but important, role? The answer: Witness (1985). It is there that Amish passengers Rachel Lapp and her son, Samuel, begin an ill-fated train trip to Philadelphia, where the boy witnesses a murder. Although the station is closed, 49,000 travelers a year park in its lot and wait on its sheltered platform for one of the 26 trains that travel daily back and forth from Harrisburg to New York City.
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