CollectionsReal Estate
IN THE NEWS

Real Estate

BUSINESS
September 30, 1986 | By Gary Cohn and Paul Magnusson, Inquirer Staff Writers (Inquirer wire services contributed to this article.)
Merrill Lynch & Co. said yesterday it planned to sell its real estate division and concentrate on its traditional retail brokerage and investment- banking services. William A. Schreyer, Merrill Lynch's chairman, said in Washington that he hoped to find a buyer by the end of the year and that the purchase price should be "north of $500 million. " The three operations, which Merrill Lynch characterized as strong and profitable, had combined 1985 revenue of $525 million, or 7.4 percent of Merrill Lynch's $7.1 billion in total revenue last year.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1990 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
By 1987, Dick Fox had been in the real estate business for 35 years, and it had never looked so good. Skyscrapers were remaking Philadelphia's skyline. Developers were bidding up the price for broken-down farms out in Berks County. Homes were selling overnight for more than their asking price. He knew it was time to get out. "There are a lot of excesses that indicate the end of a real estate cycle. And to me, it was pretty obvious," said Fox, whose company had barely weathered the real estate collapse of 1974.
NEWS
May 30, 1997 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
A special hearing to explore problems affecting the sale of real estate in Philadelphia will be held before the City Council's Rules Committee at 10 a.m. June 3. Councilman James Kenney introduced a resolution calling for the hearing last year, citing a number of problems in the way city departments handle the transfer of real property. The resolution cited some of the fees and practices that discourage people wishing to buy real estate in the city: Philadelphia's realty transfer tax, which at 3 percent is the highest of any U.S. municipality.
REAL_ESTATE
January 10, 1988 | By Charles V. Zehren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stung by the stock market crash and unsure about the course of the economy, more investors are considering real estate investment trusts and limited partnerships as less volatile places for their money, fund managers and analysts say. The appeal of these securities - which essentially give the investor a slice of real estate held by the trust or owned by the partnership - is the expectation of steady income from rentals, coupled with the hope...
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THINGS WERE TOUGH in Kingsessing during the Depression. Louis and Ida Lipson opened a delicatessen there, at 52nd Street and Warrington Avenue, but life was not always easy. Long hours, hard work and compassion for customers who sometimes couldn't pay a bill endeared them to the neighborhood. And they had a devoted son. Jay Lipson pitched in to help all he could, even as a kid. He sold Christmas trees, did odd jobs for neighbors, and even taught himself bookkeeping so he could do the ordering for the store.
REAL_ESTATE
September 16, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
It's a video about a dog named Milo and his thirtysomething, urban-dweller female owner. Or is it? Milo and his mom stop at Chic Petique for treats, then walk to a newish townhouse in the style of hundreds built in Center City's ring neighborhoods during the housing boom. We see interior views of the townhouse, along with shots of dog and owner as she makes dinner. As the video closes, we glimpse through a window the Piazza at Schmidts, so we know we're in Northern Liberties.
NEWS
December 2, 2012
Alan S. Oser, 81, the New York Times' authoritative voice in real estate coverage for more than 30 years as a writer and editor, died Tuesday in Barcelona, Spain, where he was celebrating his 60th wedding anniversary with his wife, Janice. The cause was a stroke, said his son, Roy. From 1969 through 2004, several years past his nominal retirement, Mr. Oser wrote about real estate in the daily Times and in the Sunday Real Estate section. In 2004, Mr. Oser, a violinist, founded New Paths in Music, a nonprofit organization in Manhattan that presents the work of foreign composers whose music has rarely if ever been performed in this country.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Real estate magnate Walter Shorenstein, 95, an adviser to U.S. presidents, whose company controlled about 30 million square feet of commercial real estate, died Thursday at his San Francisco home, said Andrew Neilly, a spokesman for the Shorenstein Co. The entrepreneur was a committed and influential Democrat and San Franciscan, who headed up the effort to keep the Giants baseball team from moving to Florida in 1993. His was a classic up-by-the-bootstraps story: He dropped out of the University of Pennsylvania, served in the Army Air Corps during World War II, then moved to San Francisco with little money and a pregnant wife.
NEWS
June 29, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Albert M. Greenfield Jr., 78, of Glenmoore, a real estate company chairman and Chester County civic leader, died of heart disease Saturday at home. Mr. Greenfield was the son of Albert M. Greenfield, a real estate magnate who died in 1967. In 1991, Mr. Greenfield's son, Albert III, and two other investors acquired his grandfather's real estate firm, Albert M. Greenfield & Co. Inc., and appointed Mr. Greenfield chairman. "He's a great asset," Albert III said at the time. "He's social, likable and a good businessman.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|