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ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1987 | By SUSAN STEWART, Special to the Daily News
We're still waiting for Meryl Streep to sign for a guest shot on "Hotel," but in the meantime, there is other evidence that the line between movies and TV, like the line between TV and real life, is getting blurrier. NABILA NAVIGATES LATE NIGHT Nabila Khashoggi, daughter of richest-man-in-the-world Adnan Khashoggi, will guest star in an episode of CBS' late-night show "Adderly" this season. Khasshogi will play a beautiful, cold-blooded killer from a Middle Eastern country in an episode titled "Code Name: Chipmunk.
NEWS
March 23, 1994
Some might say that Philadelphia did almost as well as Steven Spielberg at the 66th Academy Awards Monday night. The movie Philadelphia was honored with Oscars for best actor and best song, and a documentary about a North Philadelphia elementary school won as well. But there's a sense of tragedy underlying the documentary almost as profound as that in the plot of Philadelphia. The tragedy of I Am a Promise - The Children of Stanton Elementary School is that the causes for hope in the film are no longer there.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Sister Mary Ellen wanted the middle school students at Villa Maria Academy in Malvern to have a better understanding about real life - more than they receive from a textbook. She wanted them exposed to issues such as child abuse, runaways, suicides, substance abuse, adoption and abortion. And she wanted them exposed to the elderly and the handicapped. As program coordinator for the school, Sister Mary Ellen developed a program called Respect Life. Parents participated in formulating topics.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By MARK RANDALL
Like everyone else, I want to write about race relations but, being white and male, I find myself in the set that is most empowered and least fashionable, a circumstance that would seem to guarantee self-interest in the writing and uninterest in the reading. I thought maybe I could defuse this disadvantage and garner some credibility for myself by playing up my minority standing in other areas, but realized this wouldn't be easy when the only thing I could think of was less- than-average height and Catholicism.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1990 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Jane Pauley's career soared higher, faster in the weeks following her unceremonious departure from the "Today" show than it ever did while she was actually on the air. As the Spurned Woman in NBC's Deborah Norville debacle earlier this year, Pauley became more wonderful than ever in the eyes of her many fans. And she earned herself plenty of new ones at the same time. They've all been eagerly awaiting her return to the airwaves. Tonight, they'll see that getting fired from the "Today" show is a pretty tough act to follow.
NEWS
March 28, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Though "The Paper" is generally successful in capturing the ambiance of the modern tabloid newsroom, there are a few glaring flaws. You see things in "The Paper" you would never see at the Daily News. Here are some examples: A reporter volunteers for a story. In one scene, a woman is clearly heard to ask for an assignment. This is an utter falsehood. In real life, reporters go to great lengths to avoid work of any kind. When editors venture forth from their offices with assignments, reporters, like inmates in a prison movie, begin clearing their throats and banging on tin cups to signal co-workers that an editor is on the floor.
REAL_ESTATE
May 19, 2013 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
As a little girl, Evelyn Haines (nee Schufrieder), dreamed of marrying Prince Charming. Instead of living in a turreted castle, though, she and her prince would live in the big barn in Roxborough where she and her father bought produce every week. Evelyn didn't know why the barn held her spellbound. "There was just something about it," she says. Time went by. The barn, which was built in 1750, became a horse stable, then for two decades sheltered Girl Scout campers. Evelyn grew up, married a prince named Evan Haines, and moved to a condo nearby.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1989 | By Susan Stewart, Special to the Daily News
I don't know why anyone would want to watch a movie about a woman who probably shot her kids, but if anybody does, ABC's "Small Sacrifices" is very good. It's the best movie about shooting your kids that I have ever seen. I don't know if it's possible to make a better movie about shooting your kids, but I'd like to see somebody try. To improve on "Sacrifices" (four hours total, Sunday and Tuesday at 9 p.m. on Channel 6), you'd have to star somebody more beautiful than Farrah Fawcett - Jaclyn Smith?
NEWS
December 4, 1989 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's tough to find the right actor when the character he is supposed to play already seems to come straight from Central Casting. The lean and laconic Daniel J. Travanti does no disservice to the role of special prosecutor Joe Hynes in tonight's Howard Beach: Making the Case for Murder (Channel 3, 9 o'clock). He doggedly pursues the clues and eventually wins the manslaughter convictions of three young white men who chased a black man to his death on Dec. 20, 1986, in an incident here that drew national attention.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Realism. As-flat-as-a-pancake realism. Rachel Bonds' new play, Five Mile Lake , carries realism to such an extreme that you keep waiting for it to be about something, but, like life itself, it just continues without an intermission. If there's an idea here, it's some cliché, like finding diamonds in your own backyard. And then I saw that my friend sitting next to me was weeping. And that's why there are all kinds of plays. This one, under Emily Mann's direction, using all the bells and whistles that McCarter Theatre has to offer, is very skilled realism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* THE ODD COUPLE. 8:30 p.m. Thursday, CBS3.   ACTRESS Yvette Nicole Brown has a new show, a new look and an off-camera life that means a lot to her. And that life, which includes caring for a father with dementia as well as her own fight against Type 2 diabetes, has taken the former "Community" star to CBS' reboot of "The Odd Couple," where she plays Dani, the assistant to sports-radio host Oscar Madison (Matthew Perry). In Thursday's Dani-centric episode, Oscar and his finicky roomate Felix Unger (Thomas Lennon)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bread and circuses: They make the world go round. Sure, things weren't so hot this year when it came to bread. But the circuses were as healthy as ever in 2014, thanks to a constant supply of silly, stupid, narcissistic, and sex-obsessed celebs. But this year, the usual round of frolicking, twerking, punch-ups, meltdowns, and arrests was punctuated by some of the darkest sex scandals in recent memory. Explosive allegations brought down cultural icons as respected and admired as Bill Cosby and as popular as Stephen Collins . So we begin with the abysmal and abyssal and try to work our way up to the merely absurd.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
When is it acceptable for a mayor to strip off his pants on stage in front of a roomful of constituents? When the borough is Jenkintown, the mayor is Ed Foley , and the occasion is a Season Two premiere screening of ABC's hit show The Goldbergs. Under those circumstances Tuesday night, Foley's stunt - an homage to the show's Murray Goldberg, an irascible 1980s father who usually appears in tighty whiteys - got a huge round of applause from the crowd of nearly 300. The show is based on writer Adam F. Goldberg's childhood in Jenkintown.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Shep Gordon , like Zelig and Forrest Gump before him, has crossed paths with world leaders, lunched with legends, mingled meaningfully with movie stars and musicians, the glamorous and the great. The big difference, of course, is that Gordon - a fabled manager, music impresario, film exec, and showbiz playmaker - is a real person. The other difference is that though chance, or fate, or what-have-you brought Zelig, or Gump, or Gordon together with famous figures, Gordon acted on his encounters.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
LAST MONDAY, chef Nick Elmi stepped out the door of Laurel, his 22-seat East Passyunk Avenue BYOB, and exhaled in relief. Four days earlier, the 32-year-old appeared on the dramatically up-and-down finale to a dramatically up-and-down Season 11 of Bravo's "Top Chef. " Had you noticed his sigh, you might have thought he was feeling great. He won. Then again, you might have thought he was happy to be able to talk about the show publicly. ("Top Chef" rules stipulate that only the chef's spouse and lawyer can know the result before the finale.)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there About a decade ago, Hatboro native Danielle was a Rutgers journalism and psychology student and Mike was working for a Connecticut investment management company and living in his native Queens. When procrastinating on assignments, Danielle would log on to Clubplanet.com and enviously read about DJ appearances, parties, and other New York club events she mostly couldn't attend. Mike was a regular commenter whose postings were so hilarious that Danielle always read them.
NEWS
August 20, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in Media, Leigh Gallagher walked the oak-lined sidewalks of her Bowling Green neighborhood, roller-skated in the streets, and rode her decorated bicycle in the town's annual Fourth of July parade. Now an assistant managing editor at Fortune magazine, Gallagher makes frequent visits from Manhattan to her Delaware County hometown, which, with its 1920s restored theater, commuter trolley, and Main Street shops, remains "almost comically idyllic," she said. But according to the research in Gallagher's new book, The End of the Suburbs, Media has become something of a rarity: a community that still resembles what couples hope for when they move to the suburbs.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | BY MICHAEL RUSSELL, russelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5713
GRAB YOUR best guy or gal and head to a Ritz theater in Old City, because Q Fest, Philadelphia's gay cinema festival, is back again. This year's 11-day festival boasts several more movies than previous years and features a slew of Philly-centric titles: one of them, "The Happy Sad," was directed by Rodney Evans, a visiting professor with Temple's Department of Film and Media Arts. The film follows two couples, one white and heterosexual and the other black and gay, whose relationships are shaken up. Stan and Annie, the heterosexual couple, go downhill when Annie wants to take a break from the relationship.
NEWS
July 7, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rosalind Echols' teaching methods are not exactly conventional. So instead of spending the summer reading up on the scientific method to write a lesson plan, she will cruise through Alaskan waters with a team of scientists to see the process in action. Echols, a physics teacher at Science Leadership Academy in Center City, uses real-life experience in her classes. One of her favorite assignments is to ask students to study the subway to see how force causes riders to stumble if they don't grab a handbar.
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