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Rebekah Brooks

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NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By David Stringer, Associated Press
LONDON - One of Rupert Murdoch's most trusted lieutenants and five people close to her were charged Tuesday with conspiring to hide evidence of phone hacking, bringing the scandal that has raged across Britain's media and political elite uncomfortably close to Prime Minister David Cameron. The charges against former tabloid editor Rebekah Brooks, her husband, Charlie, and four aides are the first prosecutions since police reopened inquiries 18 months ago into wrongdoing by the country's scandal-hungry press.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Police investigating Britain's phone-hacking scandal swooped down on a number of homes in an early-morning raid Tuesday and arrested six people, including a woman widely identified as Rebekah Brooks, the former head of Rupert Murdoch's British newspapers. Scotland Yard said five men and the woman were arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to pervert the course of justice, a more serious charge than phone hacking. That suggests that the authorities' probe into the scandal has broadened to include an investigation into a possible cover-up by employees and executives at Murdoch-owned News International.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | By David Stringer, Associated Press
LONDON - Former editor Rebekah Brooks drew Prime Minister David Cameron closer into Britain's tabloid phone hacking scandal Friday, saying he had offered her some support after the uproar over illegal journalistic practices forced her to quit. Brooks, who resigned in July as chief executive of News International, Rupert Murdoch's British newspaper division, detailed her close friendships with Cameron, former Prime Minister Tony Blair, and their families, in testimony to the country's inquiry into media ethics.
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | By Jill Lawless and Raphael G. Satter, Associated Press
LONDON - Britain's simmering phone hacking scandal erupted again Thursday as a charity founded by the mother of a murdered child said she was targeted by a detective who worked for the News of the World. The charity, Phoenix Chief Advocates, said that Glenn Mulcaire, a detective employed by the now-defunct tabloid, had the details of Sara Payne in his notes. Payne is the mother of 8-year-old Sarah Payne, whose murder by a pedophile in 2000 shocked Britain and was heavily covered by the News of the World.
NEWS
July 16, 2011 | Associated Press
LONDON - Rupert Murdoch yesterday accepted the resignations of the Wall Street Journal 's publisher and the chief of his British operations as the once-defiant media mogul struggled to control an escalating phone-hacking scandal, offering apologies to the public and the family of a slain schoolgirl. The scandal has knocked billions off the value of Murdoch's News Corp., scuttled his ambitions to take control of a lucrative satellite TV company, withered his political power in Britain - and is threatening to destabilize his globe-spanning empire.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | By Jill Lawless and Cassandra Vinograd, Associated Press
LONDON - Scotland Yard's assistant commissioner resigned Monday, a day after his boss also quit, and fresh investigations of possible police wrongdoing were launched in the phone-hacking scandal that has spread from Rupert Murdoch's media empire to the British prime minister's office. Prime Minister David Cameron called an emergency session of Parliament on the scandal and cut short his visit to Africa to try to contain the widening crisis. Lawmakers on Tuesday are to question Murdoch, his son James, and Rebekah Brooks, the former chief executive of Murdoch's U.K. newspaper arm. In a further twist, Sean Hoare, a former News of the World reporter who helped blow the whistle on the scandal was found dead Monday in his home, but the death was not believed to be suspicious.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | Associated Press
LONDON - Scotland Yard's assistant commissioner resigned yesterday, a day after his boss also quit, and fresh investigations of possible police wrongdoing were launched in the phone-hacking scandal that has spread from Rupert Murdoch's media empire to the British prime minister's office. Prime Minister David Cameron called an emergency session of Parliament on the scandal and cut short his visit to Africa to try to contain the widening crisis. Lawmakers today are to question Murdoch, his son James and Rebekah Brooks, the former chief executive of Murdoch's U.K. newspaper arm. In a further twist, a former News of the World reporter who helped blow the whistle on the scandal was found dead yesterday in his home, but it was not believed to be suspicious.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - He'd already admitted that relations were too tight between politicians and Rupert Murdoch's media empire. But on Thursday, British Prime Minister David Cameron sat under oath, on the witness stand, answering questions and listening poker-faced as embarrassing evidence of his own coziness was read out loud in court. The grilling, in which a judge and the investigating lawyer often addressed him as "Mr. Cameron" and not "Prime Minister," was the latest chapter in a judicial inquiry on media ethics that he himself had initiated in light of Britain's phone-hacking scandal.
NEWS
July 18, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - The head of Scotland Yard resigned Sunday amid a phone-hacking scandal that has reached into the highest levels of public life in Britain, a shocking turn of events that came hours after the arrest of one of media baron Rupert Murdoch's most trusted deputies. Paul Stephenson said he was stepping down as commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service, as Scotland Yard is formally known, because of continued criticism and speculation over links between senior police officials and Murdoch's media empire.
NEWS
July 16, 2011 | By Jill Lawless and Robert Barr, Associated Press
LONDON - Rupert Murdoch accepted the resignations of the Wall Street Journal's publisher and of the chief of his British operations Friday. The once-defiant media mogul struggled to control an escalating phone-hacking scandal with a public statement of contrition and a personal apology to the family of a murdered schoolgirl. The scandal has knocked billions off the value of Murdoch's News Corp., scuttled his ambitions to take control of lucrative British Sky Broadcasting, withered his political power in Britain, and threatens to destabilize his global business.
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NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - He'd already admitted that relations were too tight between politicians and Rupert Murdoch's media empire. But on Thursday, British Prime Minister David Cameron sat under oath, on the witness stand, answering questions and listening poker-faced as embarrassing evidence of his own coziness was read out loud in court. The grilling, in which a judge and the investigating lawyer often addressed him as "Mr. Cameron" and not "Prime Minister," was the latest chapter in a judicial inquiry on media ethics that he himself had initiated in light of Britain's phone-hacking scandal.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By David Stringer, Associated Press
LONDON - One of Rupert Murdoch's most trusted lieutenants and five people close to her were charged Tuesday with conspiring to hide evidence of phone hacking, bringing the scandal that has raged across Britain's media and political elite uncomfortably close to Prime Minister David Cameron. The charges against former tabloid editor Rebekah Brooks, her husband, Charlie, and four aides are the first prosecutions since police reopened inquiries 18 months ago into wrongdoing by the country's scandal-hungry press.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | By David Stringer, Associated Press
LONDON - Former editor Rebekah Brooks drew Prime Minister David Cameron closer into Britain's tabloid phone hacking scandal Friday, saying he had offered her some support after the uproar over illegal journalistic practices forced her to quit. Brooks, who resigned in July as chief executive of News International, Rupert Murdoch's British newspaper division, detailed her close friendships with Cameron, former Prime Minister Tony Blair, and their families, in testimony to the country's inquiry into media ethics.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Police investigating Britain's phone-hacking scandal swooped down on a number of homes in an early-morning raid Tuesday and arrested six people, including a woman widely identified as Rebekah Brooks, the former head of Rupert Murdoch's British newspapers. Scotland Yard said five men and the woman were arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to pervert the course of justice, a more serious charge than phone hacking. That suggests that the authorities' probe into the scandal has broadened to include an investigation into a possible cover-up by employees and executives at Murdoch-owned News International.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Jill Lawless, ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - The criminal investigation into British tabloid skullduggery turned full force on a second Rupert Murdoch publication Saturday, with the arrest of four current and former journalists from The Sun on suspicion of bribing police. A serving police officer was also held, and authorities searched the newspaper's offices as part an investigation into illegal payments for information. The arrests spread the scandal over tabloid wrongdoing - which has already shut down one Murdoch paper, the News of the World - to Britain's best-selling newspaper.
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | By Jill Lawless and Raphael G. Satter, Associated Press
LONDON - Britain's simmering phone hacking scandal erupted again Thursday as a charity founded by the mother of a murdered child said she was targeted by a detective who worked for the News of the World. The charity, Phoenix Chief Advocates, said that Glenn Mulcaire, a detective employed by the now-defunct tabloid, had the details of Sara Payne in his notes. Payne is the mother of 8-year-old Sarah Payne, whose murder by a pedophile in 2000 shocked Britain and was heavily covered by the News of the World.
NEWS
July 24, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Perhaps, like me, you've become a devoted fan of the season's most gripping entertainment, not the final installment of astigmatic wizard H. Potter but the byzantine machinations of Rupert Murdoch, his empire's tentacles seeming to grasp and taint every aspect of British power. The phone-hacking scandal is riveting, but not exactly shocking, like much of what is happening this summer. Murdoch, long a mythic figure wielding extraordinary political influence on both sides of the Atlantic as well as in other countries, has long been viewed as a ruthless titan, willing to do and spend whatever it takes to get what he wants.
NEWS
July 22, 2011
By Mike Hoyt A few years ago, my old boss David Laventhol had an extended conversation with Rupert Murdoch about newspapers. It was after some sort of big-deal journalism dinner, and they talked long after the tired waiters wished they'd go. David had a storied career in newspapers. He helped invent the Style section of the Washington Post when he was a young editor there. He was editor and publisher of Newsday, publisher of the Los Angeles Times, and president of Times Mirror, finishing his career with me at the Columbia Journalism Review.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2011
SO MUCH television, so little time: * Sunday's World Cup match between the U.S. women's team and Japan may have proved to ESPN that we Yanks will watch soccer - because 13.5 million Americans can't be wrong - but are we really ready for scandal, British-style? The 24-hour news networks seemed to think so yesterday, providing wall-to-wall coverage of the testimony of a craftily clueless and occasionally cranky Rupert Murdoch and his smooth-as-silk son James before a House of Commons committee looking into the phone-hacking scandal that engulfed the now-closed British tabloid News of the World and may threaten Murdoch's media empire.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | By Jill Lawless and Cassandra Vinograd, Associated Press
LONDON - Scotland Yard's assistant commissioner resigned Monday, a day after his boss also quit, and fresh investigations of possible police wrongdoing were launched in the phone-hacking scandal that has spread from Rupert Murdoch's media empire to the British prime minister's office. Prime Minister David Cameron called an emergency session of Parliament on the scandal and cut short his visit to Africa to try to contain the widening crisis. Lawmakers on Tuesday are to question Murdoch, his son James, and Rebekah Brooks, the former chief executive of Murdoch's U.K. newspaper arm. In a further twist, Sean Hoare, a former News of the World reporter who helped blow the whistle on the scandal was found dead Monday in his home, but the death was not believed to be suspicious.
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