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September 26, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Mississippi football coach Tommy Tuberville has asked the team's fans not to bring the Confederate flag to home games. "We are trying to educate our students on what helps us and what hurts us in the stands," he said yesterday. The racial connotations of the Confederate flag have been debated for years at the school. And Tuberville said he is seeing more flags on campus and in the stadium during games. Since coming to Ole Miss in December 1994, Tuberville has tried to separate the university from the flag.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
When the NAACP called for a boycott of South Carolina to force the state to stop flying the Confederate flag over its statehouse, they didn't just mean you should stay away from tobacco and soybeans. Several celebs, including Patti LaBelle, Eric Benet and Brian McKnight, have taken the civil rights organization at its word and have canceled plans to perform in the Palmetto State. The pullouts have threatened the state's prestigious Spoleto Festival U.S.A., an annual 18-day celebration of arts and music, slated to begin May 25. Most recently, the New York Times reports, dancer Bill T. Jones yanked his troupe out of the festival.
NEWS
February 19, 2000
Too bad Penn State, West Chester, Lincoln and Cheyney universities have no athletic activities scheduled in South Carolina. They'd cancel them, they say, joining the NAACP-called boycott of the Palmetto State. Seven area schools have done just that. Temple University and Haverford, Swarthmore, Bryn Mawr, Dickinson and Franklin & Marshall colleges, as well as Westtown School, had athletic activities scheduled for South Carolina - but no longer. We applaud their decision - not because this kind of pressure will necessarily convince South Carolina to remove the Confederate flag from atop its Capitol in Columbia (it could have a reverse effect by reinforcing a siege mentality)
NEWS
February 8, 1995 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stray dogs sidle on past the Redbone Saloon and nose around Bob's Bar-B- Que, where inside blacks and whites sit elbow to elbow eating the $3.65 shredded-pork platters and gripping sweaty mason jars of iced tea. Blacks and whites have ordered Martha Kay's cooking for more than 30 years. "I always say these eyes don't see color, they see souls," says Kay, a black woman with teeth trimmed in gold and a hair net as tight as a spider's web. But outside Bob's and all around Todd County - the birthplace of Confederate President Jefferson Davis - folks are talking about skin color, buried hatreds and trampled civil rights.
NEWS
January 18, 2000 | by Glenn C. Loury
In 1962, the Confederate battle flag was raised for the first time over the capitol in South Carolina. With the national government just beginning to enforce the Supreme Court's desegregation edicts across the South, politicians in South Carolina wanted to symbolize their intention to resist the imposition of what they saw as illegitimate federal authority. Their rallying cry was "states' rights. " Fortunately, the right to equal protection guaranteed by the 14th Amendment won out over the purported right of states to practice segregation.
NEWS
January 22, 2000
South Carolina legislators, public sentiment is clear on the Confederate flag flying over your Capitol, however you want to measure it: 46,000 marchers against the flag versus 6,000 in favor; An NAACP boycott beginning to drain $280 million in yearly tourist dollars from your state; Entreaties from your own municipal and county governments, businesses and universities; A petition from 48 of 60-some surviving legislators who...
NEWS
August 22, 1994 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Faulkner once wrote that in the South, the past isn't dead. It's not even past. Nowhere does this statement seem more true than in the highly emotional battles being waged in the South in the 1990s, more than 125 years since the end of the Civil War, over whether the Confederate flag should continue to fly atop state buildings or be incorporated as part of state flags. The current conflict is over the Rebel flag that has fluttered for 32 years above the elegant capitol building here, just beneath the U.S. flag and the South Carolina flag.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The first African American woman in the Senate routed a reformed segregationist yesterday in a legislative battle heavy with racial symbolism. Sen. Carol Moseley-Braun (D., Ill.) persuaded others on the Senate Judiciary Committee to deny the United Daughters of the Confederacy extended patent protection for their insignia - which includes a Confederate flag. Moseley-Braun won with a crushing 12-3 vote after a passionate exchange with Sen. Strom Thurmond (R., S.C.). A patent "represents a rare honor that Congress has extended to fewer than 10 organizations in this century," Moseley-Braun argued.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
IT'S BEEN SPOTTED on license plates in Atlantic City and Collingdale, draped across a truck in a Kohl's parking lot and flying on poles outside homes in Montgomery and Chester counties. You can see it on the side of a building off Aramingo Avenue in Port Richmond, hanging inside an apartment near Capitolo Playground in South Philly and painted on the "Dukes of Hazzard" replica Dodge Charger cruising around Delaware County. In Camden, it's practically the official emblem for country-rock tailgate parties outside the Susquehanna Bank Center, where a concertgoer was charged this summer with bias intimidation for allegedly waving it at city residents and spewing racial slurs.
NEWS
February 4, 2000 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
They are the New Republicans, proud members of a new breed that wants to cast off the immigrant-bashing of the past, appeal to minorities, and build a broader, more diverse party to take advantage of a rapidly changing America. But as George W. Bush and John McCain take their suddenly close competition for the Republican presidential nomination to South Carolina, they are about to face the first real challenge to their claim - one they will see every time they look to the top of the state Capitol dome in Columbia: The Confederate battle flag.
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NEWS
September 25, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
IT'S BEEN SPOTTED on license plates in Atlantic City and Collingdale, draped across a truck in a Kohl's parking lot and flying on poles outside homes in Montgomery and Chester counties. You can see it on the side of a building off Aramingo Avenue in Port Richmond, hanging inside an apartment near Capitolo Playground in South Philly and painted on the "Dukes of Hazzard" replica Dodge Charger cruising around Delaware County. In Camden, it's practically the official emblem for country-rock tailgate parties outside the Susquehanna Bank Center, where a concertgoer was charged this summer with bias intimidation for allegedly waving it at city residents and spewing racial slurs.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
BENGHAZI, Libya - Omar el-Keish wanted to make a strong statement when he headed out with his wife and daughter for a revolutionary rally in the de facto rebel capital. Keish decided to bring along a flag. It wasn't the ubiquitous Libyan rebel flag that flutters at every downtown rally. He chose the American flag - the Stars and Stripes - on a long, heavy pole. The 57-year-old airline pilot waved the big fluttering fabric with both arms, and rally-goers smiled and flashed the V for victory sign at the sight of Old Glory.
NEWS
April 29, 2003
YOUR liberal rag sank to new depths with its April 24 front page smear of U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum. Thank God that there are people like Sen. Santorum willing to stand up for basic morals, especially as an elected official. And thank God for the people of Pennsylvania, the vast majority of whom see past the kind of ultra-liberal slant pushed by the Daily News with pieces like this (and that immature lib comic "Shrubbery" that disgraces your pages). Matt Veasey, Philadelphia Loved your April 23 editorial about Rick Santorum having a "problem" with homosexual acts.
NEWS
March 18, 2000
Not 'pushing beer' PETA isn't "pushing beer" (article, March 13). We stress fruit juices, soy milk and mineral water - even soda - over milk or beer. We've invoked beer in our nutritional comparison simply to make the point that milk is so awful for you that even beer - certainly no health food itself - would be a better choice. PETA urges everyone, beer-drinkers included, to drink responsibly. Where milk is concerned, there's no such thing. ALISON GREEN, Norfolk, Va. Dissuading college students and everyone else from drinking cow's milk is an intelligent idea, even though no one would seriously suggest beer as a healthy alternative (article, March 13)
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
When the NAACP called for a boycott of South Carolina to force the state to stop flying the Confederate flag over its statehouse, they didn't just mean you should stay away from tobacco and soybeans. Several celebs, including Patti LaBelle, Eric Benet and Brian McKnight, have taken the civil rights organization at its word and have canceled plans to perform in the Palmetto State. The pullouts have threatened the state's prestigious Spoleto Festival U.S.A., an annual 18-day celebration of arts and music, slated to begin May 25. Most recently, the New York Times reports, dancer Bill T. Jones yanked his troupe out of the festival.
NEWS
February 19, 2000
Too bad Penn State, West Chester, Lincoln and Cheyney universities have no athletic activities scheduled in South Carolina. They'd cancel them, they say, joining the NAACP-called boycott of the Palmetto State. Seven area schools have done just that. Temple University and Haverford, Swarthmore, Bryn Mawr, Dickinson and Franklin & Marshall colleges, as well as Westtown School, had athletic activities scheduled for South Carolina - but no longer. We applaud their decision - not because this kind of pressure will necessarily convince South Carolina to remove the Confederate flag from atop its Capitol in Columbia (it could have a reverse effect by reinforcing a siege mentality)
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the fields of South Carolina, where hundreds of thousands of African Americans once labored as slaves, cotton farmers are shaking off the tedium of winter and starting to plan their crop. And although much of the state's cotton eventually will go to make shirts and slacks, sweaters and socks, it is possible that some of it could be used by a New Jersey firm for a more controversial purpose: to make the Confederate flags that fly atop the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia, the capital.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | By David Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Hoping to reignite his presidential campaign, Bill Bradley unleashed an impassioned attack yesterday against racial prejudice in this state where the Confederate flag still flies atop the Capitol dome. His intended audience was much larger than the appreciative crowd that packed the auditorium at Benedict College, a small, historically black institution here. Buffeted by sinking poll numbers and a sense that the air is leaking out of his insurgent campaign for the Democratic nomination, Bradley hoped to use his speech to reach African American voters in key primary states such as New York, and to invigorate his liberal base.
NEWS
February 4, 2000 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
They are the New Republicans, proud members of a new breed that wants to cast off the immigrant-bashing of the past, appeal to minorities, and build a broader, more diverse party to take advantage of a rapidly changing America. But as George W. Bush and John McCain take their suddenly close competition for the Republican presidential nomination to South Carolina, they are about to face the first real challenge to their claim - one they will see every time they look to the top of the state Capitol dome in Columbia: The Confederate battle flag.
NEWS
January 22, 2000
South Carolina legislators, public sentiment is clear on the Confederate flag flying over your Capitol, however you want to measure it: 46,000 marchers against the flag versus 6,000 in favor; An NAACP boycott beginning to drain $280 million in yearly tourist dollars from your state; Entreaties from your own municipal and county governments, businesses and universities; A petition from 48 of 60-some surviving legislators who...
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