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Rebels

NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Ryan Lucas, Associated Press
BREGA, Libya - Rebel fighters pushed back into this hard-fought oil town Monday, seizing half of Brega and pledging to drive out Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's forces in hours in an advance that would open a vital conduit for oil sales by the oppostion. Control of Brega's small refinery and Mediterranean port could significantly boost the rebels' hunt for revenues that they could use to buy heavy weapons for the fight against Gadhafi's better-equipped troops and militiamen. Lightly armed and loosely organized opposition forces have surged into and beyond Brega several times in recent weeks from their strongholds in eastern Libya, only to be driven out by Gadhafi loyalists.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Rukmini Callimachi and Baba Ahmed, Associated Press
BAMAKO, Mali - Despite a punishing bombardment by French warplanes, al-Qaeda-linked insurgents grabbed more territory in Mali on Monday, seizing a strategic military camp that brought them far closer to the government's seat of power. Declaring France had "opened the gates of hell" with its assault, the rebels threatened retribution. "France . . . has fallen into a trap much more dangerous than Iraq, Afghanistan, or Somalia," said Omar Ould Hamaha, a leader of the Movement for Oneness and Jihad in West Africa, one of the rebel groups controlling the north, speaking on Europe 1 radio.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration plans to give the Libyan opposition $25 million in nonlethal assistance in the first direct U.S. aid to the rebels after weeks of assessing their capabilities and intentions, officials said Wednesday. Amid a debate over whether to offer the rebels broader assistance, including cash and possibly weapons and ammunition, the administration has informed Congress that President Obama intends to use his so-called drawdown authority to give the opposition, led by the Transitional National Council in Benghazi, up to $25 million in surplus American goods to help protect civilians in rebel-held areas threatened by Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's forces.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Saleh Mwanamilongo, Associated Press
KINSHASA, Congo - Congo's president accused Rwanda of backing a new rebellion in Congo's east and called their support an "open secret. " President Joseph Kabila spoke to journalists late Saturday in a rare appearance and said that the government would investigate accusations that Uganda may also be backing the M23 rebellion in the east, though the country said it was not involved. The uprising has brought the worst violence in years to the already volatile Congo. It has forced more than 260,000 people from their homes in the last three months.
NEWS
February 24, 1986 | By Tim Weiner, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Ferdinand Marcos appeared on government television today to prove he was in control of a nation. Forty minutes later, the government lost control of the station carrying his address. During that hastily called news conference at the presidential palace - which continued even after rebel soldiers commandeered the station's transmitter - Marcos declared a state of emergency and the use of "extreme force" to retake control of all military and broadcast installations.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | By Juan O. Tamayo and Tom Fiedler, Inquirer Gulf Staff Carol Rosenberg of the Inquirer gulf staff contributed to this article, as did the Associated Press, Reuters and the Washington Post
Troops loyal to President Saddam Hussein used heavy artillery and tank fire yesterday in an attempt to quell the Shiite Muslim insurrection sweeping through southern Iraq, and one top U.S. military official predicted that the rebellion would fail. Adm. Mike McConnell, director of intelligence for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said he believed Hussein would eventually come out on top because the rebels lacked heavy weapons, communications and leadership. McConnell said forces loyal to Hussein had used tanks, artillery and heavy weapons against some of the insurgents or buildings they have occupied.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | By Martin McReynolds, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Leftist guerrillas in El Salvador have flagrantly violated international law by executing several hundred people since the early 1980s, the human rights group Americas Watch said yesterday. Americas Watch, which has a reputation for careful documentation of its reports, rejected statements by the rebel Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front (FMLN) that its executions are carried out after trials that meet international standards of due process. The New York-based human rights group called on the FMLN to abandon executions and to stop holding trials until it can prove to an impartial body, such as the Human Rights Commission of the Organization of American States, that the rebel courts are fair to the defendants.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Christopher Torchia and Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
ISTANBUL, Turkey - A coalition of at least 70 countries pledged several million dollars a month and communications equipment Sunday for Syrian rebels and opposition activists, signaling deeper involvement in the conflict amid a growing belief that diplomacy and sanctions alone cannot end the regime's repression. The shift by the United States and its Western and Arab allies toward seeking to sway the military balance in Syria, where heavily armed regime forces overmatch rebels, carries regional risks because the crisis there increasingly resembles a proxy conflict that could exacerbate sectarian tensions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Even though it is spanking new, Pascali's Island has the musty odor of a turn-of-the-century relic. And not because this period piece about European intrigue on a Turkish-occupied Greek isle in the Aegean is set in talk, no- action saga. Since it looks written instead of directed and pictorial instead of cinematic, Pascali reeks of quality films from an era when literacy and luster genteelly substituted for narrative thrust. This, the first big-screen feature by James Dearden, who earned a kind of immortality as the screenwriter of Fatal Attraction, demands to be read like a novel or regarded like a sculpture.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Zeina Karam, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - The unsteady, handheld video shows several bloodied prisoners, one in boxer shorts, being led into a noisy outdoor crowd and placed against a wall. The prisoners crouch and seem to avert their eyes as men carrying assault rifles shout slogans and take aim. The gunfire lasts for more than 30 seconds. The international community has accused Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's forces of war crimes, but the gunmen in this gruesome video were rebels. Their slogans: "Free Syrian Army Forever!"
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