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Rechargeable Batteries

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NEWS
August 13, 1991 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Goaded by new environmentally-conscious laws already passed in three states and pending in many others, small-appliance and battery makers are now rushing to redesign their wares. They've got until mid-1993 to meet a deadline set by Vermont, Minnesota and Connecticut that all products sold with built-in rechargeable batteries - like cordless telephones, personal stereos, portable computers, hand vacuum cleaners, electric toothbrushes and cordless power tools - must have batteries that are "easily removable" and replaceable by the consumer.
TRAVEL
February 5, 2012
Satechi's 3-square-inch BT Wireless Bluetooth Speaker looks like a little hovercraft with a pop-up midsection. It won't actually go airborne, but the sound sure will.. The diminutive speaker pairs easily with Bluetooth smartphones and other audio devices for wireless amplified music or phone conversations, thanks to an integrated microphone, up to a distance of 33 feet. It also has a built-in 3.5mm audio jack for connecting non-Bluetooth electronics. The speaker has lithium-ion rechargeable batteries, and comes with a USB cable for charging and powering.
FOOD
December 4, 1991 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: We have small night lights in our bedrooms. My sons insists that they should be left on during the day because the bulbs will last longer that way. I say they'll last longer turned off during the day. Who's right? Dear Meg: Why not try a little experiment? Put fresh bulbs in two lights, then leave one burning continuously and turn the other off each day. You'll be able to judge for yourself which light lasts longer. I'm betting with your son, however. Generally, the stress placed on turning the bulb on and off frequently will shorten the life of the bulb.
FOOD
September 5, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Now's an excellent time to invest in rechargable batteries. Costs of rechargers and companion cells are coming down, and the latest products are more convenient to use. And you'll be doing the whole earth a favor by making the switch to recyclable energy cells. Environmentalists say that conventional throwaway batteries are among the worst pollution nightmares, annually pouring two and a half billion tons of chemicals and clutter into landfills every year. According to recent research, the average household has nine battery- powered products and makes 30 battery purchases every year.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Those tiny little batteries that power hearing aids and watches are more potent than they look. They are packed with mercury, a substance that can be hazardous even after the batteries run out of steam. Wheelabrator Environmental Systems Inc. is starting a pilot recycling project in Falls Township to keep the batteries out of household garbage sent to landfills and incinerators. "Mercury needs to be taken out of the solid-waste stream," said Christine Meket, public-relations manager for Wheelabrator's mid-Atlantic region.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1992 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's less than two weeks till Christmas. Are you having trouble figuring out what to give that tree-hugging friend or relative of yours? Here are some suggestions, courtesy of the Environmental Defense Fund and Inform, an organization that specializes in environmental and business issues. For the energy-saver you love and cherish, compact fluorescent light bulbs would be great, as would rechargeable batteries, along with, of course, a charger. For the children on your list, go a step further: Buy windup toys and avoid batteries altogether.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1988 | By Dan Gutman, Special to The Inquirer
Infrared remote-controlled mailboxes. Ultrasonic doggie distractors. High- tech gardening. While other reporters dutifully covered the CD players and DAT decks at the recent Consumer Electronics Show in Chicago, I spent the convention mesmerized by the latest ridiculous computerized gizmos. Data bases bore me, but electronic garage-door openers and computerized flea and tick collars turn me on. And in this age of the Couch Potato, the idea seems to be to use computer technology to make life as silly as possible.
LIVING
November 13, 1995 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just in time for the busy shopping and eating season and just in time to echo endlessly through the glittering goods-laden halls of shopping malls, a lone voice comes from Ann Arbor, Mich. It calls out: "Uuuuse Lessss Stufffff. " As of Nov. 16 and at least until Jan. 1, the voice pleads: Buy less, cook less, throw out less. Stop the consumption madness. The call, being issued by Robert Lilienfeld, a management consultant, and being echoed by several environmental organizations, is based on this premise: Between Thanksgiving and Jan. 1, the nation generates an additional 25 million tons of garbage, largely the result of shopping.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By John Corcoran, Special to The Inquirer
Are you in the market for a 30-foot cabin cruiser - cheap? Well, you missed your opportunity. You could have had one free if you had been hanging around the Pennsylvania Resources Council (PRC) office in Media last month. That's when the nonprofit environmental group fielded one of the first calls on its national waste-reduction hotline, 1-800-Go-to-PRC, from a woman who wanted to dispose of her deceased husband's boat. The organization was not able to offer much help to this woman, said Jan Stavely, program director for PRC. The best advice it could offer was for the woman to contact a Boy Scout Explorers troop or similar organization that might have a use for it. It seems the hotline was not set up to help people get rid of boats.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It was June 1963 when a young, vigorous American president went to divided Berlin and uttered the immortal phrase: Ich bin ein Berliner. Following in John F. Kennedy's path, another young, vigorous U.S. president came to one of Eastern Europe's new democracies with a slightly different if unspoken message: Ja Isem Zakaznik K-Martu! (I am a Kmart Shopper). When Bill Clinton visited the Czech Republic's latest American import yesterday that message was clear. This U.S. administration believes the linchpin of democracy is capitalism, American style.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
February 5, 2012
Satechi's 3-square-inch BT Wireless Bluetooth Speaker looks like a little hovercraft with a pop-up midsection. It won't actually go airborne, but the sound sure will.. The diminutive speaker pairs easily with Bluetooth smartphones and other audio devices for wireless amplified music or phone conversations, thanks to an integrated microphone, up to a distance of 33 feet. It also has a built-in 3.5mm audio jack for connecting non-Bluetooth electronics. The speaker has lithium-ion rechargeable batteries, and comes with a USB cable for charging and powering.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Here's a quiz: What do you think when you hear the words Philadelphia School District and green ? A superintendent best remembered for the way she got paid? Try this one: On Monday, Philadelphia will be named the nation's No. 1 urban school district when it comes to making schools sustainable. And no, we're not talking about solar-powered metal detectors. Picture buildings whose designs save energy, conserve natural resources, and provide an environment, as Manny Ortiz, a junior at Kensington's Creative and Performing Arts High School, put it, "that makes me for the first time want to show off my school.
LIVING
November 13, 1995 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just in time for the busy shopping and eating season and just in time to echo endlessly through the glittering goods-laden halls of shopping malls, a lone voice comes from Ann Arbor, Mich. It calls out: "Uuuuse Lessss Stufffff. " As of Nov. 16 and at least until Jan. 1, the voice pleads: Buy less, cook less, throw out less. Stop the consumption madness. The call, being issued by Robert Lilienfeld, a management consultant, and being echoed by several environmental organizations, is based on this premise: Between Thanksgiving and Jan. 1, the nation generates an additional 25 million tons of garbage, largely the result of shopping.
SPORTS
April 28, 1995 | by Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
As the Flyers happily lugged the Atlantic Division title on to their bus underneath the Meadowlands Arena last Saturday evening, Flyers coach Terry Murray had a tough decision to make about the team's final five games. By vanquishing the host New Jersey Devils in overtime, the Flyers had guaranteed themselves no worse than second seeding in the Eastern Conference playoffs. They had little left to play for, except the possibility of overtaking No. 1 Quebec, which would give them the home-ice advantage in the third round of the playoffs, should they face the Nordiques.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1994 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hope Technologies Inc., a small Willow Grove company, is trying to recharge itself in a way that could give quite a jolt to the staid, old battery industry. The company has been restructured in preparation for what its new leaders - it is hard to resist the expression - hope will be a bright future, powered by a patented lithium polymer technology. Once a pioneer in the processing of thin films, Hope is on a quest for what some call the Holy Grail of technology - development of a lightweight and long-lasting rechargeable battery.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It was June 1963 when a young, vigorous American president went to divided Berlin and uttered the immortal phrase: Ich bin ein Berliner. Following in John F. Kennedy's path, another young, vigorous U.S. president came to one of Eastern Europe's new democracies with a slightly different if unspoken message: Ja Isem Zakaznik K-Martu! (I am a Kmart Shopper). When Bill Clinton visited the Czech Republic's latest American import yesterday that message was clear. This U.S. administration believes the linchpin of democracy is capitalism, American style.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Those tiny little batteries that power hearing aids and watches are more potent than they look. They are packed with mercury, a substance that can be hazardous even after the batteries run out of steam. Wheelabrator Environmental Systems Inc. is starting a pilot recycling project in Falls Township to keep the batteries out of household garbage sent to landfills and incinerators. "Mercury needs to be taken out of the solid-waste stream," said Christine Meket, public-relations manager for Wheelabrator's mid-Atlantic region.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1992 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's less than two weeks till Christmas. Are you having trouble figuring out what to give that tree-hugging friend or relative of yours? Here are some suggestions, courtesy of the Environmental Defense Fund and Inform, an organization that specializes in environmental and business issues. For the energy-saver you love and cherish, compact fluorescent light bulbs would be great, as would rechargeable batteries, along with, of course, a charger. For the children on your list, go a step further: Buy windup toys and avoid batteries altogether.
FOOD
December 4, 1991 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: We have small night lights in our bedrooms. My sons insists that they should be left on during the day because the bulbs will last longer that way. I say they'll last longer turned off during the day. Who's right? Dear Meg: Why not try a little experiment? Put fresh bulbs in two lights, then leave one burning continuously and turn the other off each day. You'll be able to judge for yourself which light lasts longer. I'm betting with your son, however. Generally, the stress placed on turning the bulb on and off frequently will shorten the life of the bulb.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Goaded by new environmentally-conscious laws already passed in three states and pending in many others, small-appliance and battery makers are now rushing to redesign their wares. They've got until mid-1993 to meet a deadline set by Vermont, Minnesota and Connecticut that all products sold with built-in rechargeable batteries - like cordless telephones, personal stereos, portable computers, hand vacuum cleaners, electric toothbrushes and cordless power tools - must have batteries that are "easily removable" and replaceable by the consumer.
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