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Recovery Act

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NEWS
October 30, 2009
WE HAD our worries about President Obama's American Recovery Act from the time it was announced that $787 billion would be released to states and cities. Not because it wasn't a good idea to unleash wads of cash to stimulate the economy and create lots of jobs, but because from the beginning, the directive was to spend the money as quickly as possible. Governments, large piles of money and speed are never a good combination. Now, the news of how the city has done so far on managing the process of getting that federal money brings a new worry.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | BY VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN
THREE YEARS ago today, in his first major act in office, President Obama signed into law the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. It stirred a great debate. Some called it too big; others, too meager. With just a handful of exceptions, Republicans maligned it as the absolute wrong approach to creating jobs. Today, that argument is settled. The Recovery Act did what we asked of it. Three million jobs were created or saved. Essential investments in keeping teachers on the job, building a domestic clean-energy industry, and repairing our roads and bridges have helped to foster the economic growth that we are now starting to see. The president is building an economy meant to last, and the Recovery Act is part of the foundation.
NEWS
September 5, 2002 | By Dwight Ott and Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On the heels of a court action that overturned a portion of the state's $175 million recovery plan for Camden, a city activist yesterday filed a suit to block the entire plan. Resident Frank Fulbrook filed the four-page complaint on his own behalf in Superior Court in Mercer County, where last month a judge nullified part of the act that called for restructuring the Camden school board. Fulbrook argued that the recovery bill is unconstitutional. The law was enacted this summer to give the state, through a chief operating officer, unprecedented control over Camden in exchange for an infusion of cash to revitalize the city.
NEWS
May 8, 2005 | By Elisa Ung and Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
On the eve of Tuesday's Camden election, campaign literature is falling like autumn leaves - much of it aimed at a maverick city councilman. One is titled: "Why I would NEVER vote for Ali Sloan El. By (State) Senator Wayne Bryant. " Another has a picture of a smiling Melvin R. "Randy" Primas, Camden's state-appointed chief operating officer. "I've been the mayor of Camden," he reminds voters. "It's a tough job, and it needs the right person to do it. Ali Sloan El is NOT that person.
NEWS
January 27, 2003 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A provision in the state's $175 million recovery act for Camden could benefit a nonprofit health-care corporation run by the brother of State Sen. Wayne Bryant, the legislation's architect. One of the aims of the act is to create a university and medical district in Camden. It includes an allocation of $13.35 million to Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center, but stipulates that Cooper not use the money to establish or expand family-practice facilities. To address such services, the legislation then says, "Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center may make available a portion of these funds to a federally qualified health center operating in the city of Camden.
NEWS
May 13, 2010 | By MICHAEL NUTTER
THE AMERICAN Recovery and Reinvestment Act is generating jobs and investments in an area in which Philadelphia is already a leader: higher education and scientific research. Philadelphia's future as an intellectual mecca and catalyst of scientific discovery is thus assured. The region's wealth of scientific and academic institutions make it a target for federal research dollars and the selection of local grant recipients is further aided by Sen. Arlen Specter, whose support for medical and scientific research is well known.
NEWS
March 19, 2003 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This time, it was not even close. The state judge who last summer declared parts of an economic recovery act unconstitutional because it targeted one city - Camden - yesterday gave the revised version his constitutional blessing. "Remarkably, the legislature addressed the specific problems and corrected the deficiencies," Judge Andrew J. Smithson said in an oral ruling in Superior Court in Mercer County. State lawmakers satisfied Smithson's qualms by "significantly expanding" the number of struggling cities that could qualify for state aid, he said.
NEWS
November 16, 2004 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge yesterday set Dec. 16 for a hearing in the first full-blown showdown between Camden's state-appointed chief operating officer and City Council since the enactment of the Camden recovery act two years ago. The dispute is over Melvin R. "Randy" Primas' veto of Council's rejection this month of a redevelopment plan for the Waterfront South neighborhood. Primas said yesterday that the plan was key to revitalization plans for the city. Previous confrontations were resolved before any need to call in Judge Francis J. Orlando of Camden County, who was appointed to mediate impasses between the chief operating officers and elected officials under the $175 million recovery act. Orlando detailed a schedule for written submissions before the hearing.
NEWS
March 13, 2003 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The chambers of Superior Court Judge Andrew J. Smithson in Trenton may be packed tomorrow, when he could decide whether the $175 million Camden recovery act lives or dies. His ruling on three lawsuits challenging the state plan's constitutionality could be a turning point in Camden's future, both long- and short-term. City officials are racing to close an unprecedented $24 million budget gap that could be relieved with state "rehabilitation" money available under the recovery act. A decision striking down the plan could mean imminent City Hall layoffs and service cuts, municipal officials said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | BY VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN
THREE YEARS ago today, in his first major act in office, President Obama signed into law the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. It stirred a great debate. Some called it too big; others, too meager. With just a handful of exceptions, Republicans maligned it as the absolute wrong approach to creating jobs. Today, that argument is settled. The Recovery Act did what we asked of it. Three million jobs were created or saved. Essential investments in keeping teachers on the job, building a domestic clean-energy industry, and repairing our roads and bridges have helped to foster the economic growth that we are now starting to see. The president is building an economy meant to last, and the Recovery Act is part of the foundation.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
With so much focus on energy efficiency these days, it's hard to believe that dozens of South Jersey municipalities haven't applied for $20,000 in no-strings grants to conduct energy audits that could point to substantial savings. The grants, plus funding to implement energy efficiencies, are available through a federal stimulus program under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act. With a deadline to apply of Dec. 31, it's good to see that the energy audits are being promoted by volunteers in the "Jersey Call to Service," a program of the Citizens' Campaign, which seeks to involve citizens in their communities.
NEWS
August 13, 2010 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carl Greene tried to be tactful. At a groundbreaking Thursday, the executive director of the Philadelphia Housing Authority (PHA) described a former public housing project at 72d Street and Paschall Avenue as "attractive for antisocial behavior. " Read: drug-dealing on such a colossal scale that it led to a federal sting and the arrests of 22 people in 2006. At the time, federal agents and Philadelphia police pledged to rid the area of crime. And Greene vowed to raze the fortress-style apartment complex and replace it with a livable, secure community.
NEWS
May 13, 2010 | By MICHAEL NUTTER
THE AMERICAN Recovery and Reinvestment Act is generating jobs and investments in an area in which Philadelphia is already a leader: higher education and scientific research. Philadelphia's future as an intellectual mecca and catalyst of scientific discovery is thus assured. The region's wealth of scientific and academic institutions make it a target for federal research dollars and the selection of local grant recipients is further aided by Sen. Arlen Specter, whose support for medical and scientific research is well known.
NEWS
February 17, 2010 | By Stephen Herzenberg
Nearly a year ago, Congress took a decisive step to shore up an economy in free fall by passing the $787 billion stimulus bill. Since then, we have seen millions of Americans enter the ranks of the unemployed, billions of dollars spent on economic recovery, and quarterly growth swinging from the largest decline in a generation to positive territory in the same year. Cut through all the numbers, though, and this is what you find: The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act saved us from plunging into a second Great Depression.
NEWS
January 6, 2010
Less than a year after approving a $787 billion plan to fight the recession, Congress is poised to spend another $174 billion for the same purpose. Not so fast. This latest "jobs bill" covers much of the same ground that was addressed in the earlier, costlier economic recovery act. And much of the money from the first antirecession program hasn't even been spent yet. The country can't afford the full price tag of this second "stimulus" measure, approved last month by the House.
NEWS
November 10, 2009
WHEN 219 Democrats - and one Republican - passed the Affordable Health Care for Americans Act just before midnight on Saturday, there was loud cheering and extended applause in the House of Representatives. It was deserved. In 60-plus years of talking about it, a bill aimed at providing universal health insurance had passed a house of Congress. It was an historic victory. So why did the celebration feel so hollow? What should have been a sweet victory was soured by the razor-thin margin of the House bill's passage.
NEWS
October 30, 2009
WE HAD our worries about President Obama's American Recovery Act from the time it was announced that $787 billion would be released to states and cities. Not because it wasn't a good idea to unleash wads of cash to stimulate the economy and create lots of jobs, but because from the beginning, the directive was to spend the money as quickly as possible. Governments, large piles of money and speed are never a good combination. Now, the news of how the city has done so far on managing the process of getting that federal money brings a new worry.
NEWS
September 3, 2009 | By Adrienne Lu INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The state should reevaluate its role in Camden, Assembly Speaker Joseph J. Roberts Jr. said yesterday, suggesting that local officials be given more control over city affairs. A reassessment of the state's authority in Camden could come this year, he said. Roberts was a sponsor of the 2002 Municipal Rehabilitation and Recovery Act, which put Camden under state control for five years and directed $175 million in state funding to the city. In 2007, that control was extended to 2012, with the option of another extension to 2017.
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