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Recreation

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NEWS
June 28, 1990 | By David T. Shaw, Special to The Inquirer
The 16 East Caln residents at Tuesday's special meeting to discuss recreation in the township all agreed on the need for a park facility. But when it came to specifics, their opinions were diverse. Bicycling. Skateboarding. Swimming pools. Tot lots. Playing fields. Tennis courts. Amphitheaters. Even gardening plots for senior citizens were discussed. Each time the majority reacted favorably to a suggestion, at least one person voiced opposition, either because of insurance liability, lack of interest - or the weather.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, Special to The Inquirer
Burlington Township officials consider a developer's $283,800 contribution to the township recreation fund to be a sporting alternative. Calton Homes, of Freehold, deposited the money into the special account last month in lieu of constructing recreation facilities at its Bridle Club at Burlington development on Oxmead Road. Although builders are not required by Burlington zoning laws to turn over recreational planning and construction to the township, officials welcome the move because it allows municipal planners to control the placement of facilities and types of recreation - serving a greater percentage of people at no additional cost to taxpayers.
NEWS
August 14, 1986 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Horsham council member challenged his colleagues this week to approve more money for the township's parks and recreation program. Joseph A. Hari, one of five Republicans on the council, proposed at Tuesday's monthly council meeting to take 1 mill from the township's general revenue budget and apply it to the parks and recreation budget, which is about $67,000 this year. A mill is worth $65,000 of the township's $3.5 million budget. Hari told council it was "unconscionable" that Little League teams and township soccer clubs had to raise money privately to pay for broken fences, grass-cutting and electric bills for refreshment stands and field lights.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Karen K. Gress, Special to The Inquirer
New Garden Township supervisors are negotiating to purchase 24 acres behind the township building for a central recreation area. Board Chairman Willard H. Smedley Jr. announced the township's intention to buy the open space on Route 41 at Monday's supervisors meeting. The land, owned by Aaron Martin of Kennett Township, borders 6 acres of township property that houses the township building and garage and a state police truck-weighing station. Although Smedley refused to give details, he said results of a recent meeting with Martin made him optimistic that the purchase would be made.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | By David T. Shaw, Special to The Inquirer
East Caln officials do not want to see township residents turn into a horde of couch potatoes. So they have begun to look at ways to accommodate the needs of East Caln's residents, who have no fields in the township for recreational activity. In March, East Caln's Board of Supervisors authorized its Planning Commission to prepare a recreation and open-space study of the township. Two months later, the board authorized the commission to work with Thomas Comitta Associates of West Chester, which specializes in land-use planning and has worked with several other townships.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a bid to "link up the works of God and the works of man," as preservationist Dulcie Flaharty put it, federal, state and local officials gathered in West Conshohocken yesterday to resume discussion of the opportunities offered by the area's "hidden river," the Schuylkill. About 60 politicians and planners met with U.S. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt to hear Montgomery County's plans for recreational development along the long-neglected waterway. "We've looked at the Schuylkill in utilitarian terms," said Michael Stokes, assistant director of the county Planning Commission.
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | By JOSEPH GRACE, Daily News Staff Writer
The city's newest recreation commissioner vows the beleaguered department is in for a change. The last two recreation commissioners were Harold J. Comfort, who was criticized by City Council for his lack of knowledge about the department, and Nathaniel Washington, who resigned following a drunken-driving arrest. The new commissioner, Delores Williams-Andy, appointed yesterday by Mayor Goode to replace Comfort, is a Temple University associate professor of recreation studies with a master's degree and a growing national reputation in the field.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
The Downingtown-Uwchlan joint recreation program is in "severe jeopardy" because of a financial dispute between Uwchlan Township and the Downingtown school board, according to Uwchlan Supervisor John Tribanic. The board has insisted that residents of all municipalities in the school district pay the same fees for recreation programs as do Uwchlan and Downingtown residents. In exchange, the district has allowed rent-free use of school facilities. Previously, Uwchlan had charged residents outside the two municipalities a small surcharge to offset administrative and insurance costs.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Movies in the park and shuffleboard were on the minds of Coatesville City Council members, who last week discussed forming a recreation department to organize sports and social activities. Money to start a department, which would sponsor an array of programs for city youth and adults, could be included in next year's budget "if we can afford it," city manager Wayne "Ted" Reed said. City staff members will study the possibility during the coming months, he added. The discussion started at Monday night's session when Councilwoman Delois Newton said too many children were spending their evenings hanging out in parks, with nothing to occupy them.
REAL_ESTATE
April 25, 1999 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Recreation facilities are a key to the success of any new-home development, but they appear to be most important to the active-adult buyer. And active-adult, or over-55, housing is critical to the continuation of the current boom in residential real estate. The clubhouse at Fox Hill Farm in Glen Mills, Delaware County, is a prime example. Because active adults put a premium on recreation and leisure time, builder Frank McKee Jr. of the McKee Group had to give his buyers a lot more than he had anticipated.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
A new public health concept - combining medical care with recreation and education - came to brick-and-mortar life with Monday's opening of the South Philadelphia Community Health and Literacy Center. Parents can take their kids to the third-floor pediatric clinic and then visit the primary-care center a floor down for their own health needs. A branch library will soon open at ground level, with a special section where patients can learn more about their health issues. The new recreation center will open next month, providing exercise as a foundation for healthy living.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert A. Glascott, 81, of Plymouth Meeting, a coach, boys' camp official, Penn Relays organizer, and retired college recreation director, whose work touched the lives of thousands of young people, died Monday, Dec. 7. Mr. Glascott died of pulmonary fibrosis at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. A native Philadelphian, Mr. Glascott distinguished himself at Roman Catholic High School in football, basketball, and track. In 1951 and 1952, he was named all-Catholic, all-scholastic, and all-city as a football player and twice received awards from the Maxwell Football Club.
NEWS
November 14, 2015 | Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael DiBerardinis, Philadelphia's parks and recreation czar and a longtime cabinet appointee to two mayors, is Mayor-elect Jim Kenney's choice to be his managing director. Kenney is to announce the choice of DiBerardinis for the top cabinet post at a news conference Friday, a city hall source with knowledge of Kenney's decision said. The source spoke on condition of anonymity. DiBerardinis will be one of three high-level appointments to be announced Friday. Currently parks and recreation commissioner and a deputy mayor in the Nutter administration, DiBernardinis will be moving up to a post that the mayor-elect has said will take on more authority.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along hundreds of miles of railroad tracks, mourners stood silently, reverently, as a doleful whistle and wisps of smoke and steam announced the approaching funeral train. Many wept and bowed their heads as it passed. In towns where the locomotive stopped, thousands surged forward, pushing and jostling to get a better view. Bands played melancholy tunes and preachers offered up solemn prayers. They focused on a dark maroon railcar, swathed in black crepe, carrying the martyred Abraham Lincoln, who had come on another train four years earlier to tell throngs at Independence Hall that he'd "rather be assassinated on this spot than surrender" the country.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A coalition of civil liberties and antidiscrimination groups has joined with prosecutors, police, medical professionals, and political activists to launch a campaign to make New Jersey the next state in the nation to legalize marijuana. Under the name New Jersey United for Marijuana Reform, the coalition includes the state chapters of the ACLU and the NAACP; Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, and the president of the state Municipal Prosecutors Association, which last year voted in favor of legalization for adults.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's ambitious $2.4 billion, 25-year storm-water management program hinges on innovative practices such as porous pavement, green roofs, and rain gardens to soak up the first flows of rainfall. Anything to keep storm water from overwhelming the sewer system and overflowing into area rivers and streams, carrying road oil and litter and raw sewage with it. But, in the final analysis, sometimes you have to bring on the tank. On Tuesday, the city formally cut the ribbon on a $46 million project on Venice Island in Manayunk that includes a massive tank to hold the storm water and raw sewage that in an earlier time would have gushed into the Schuylkill during big storms.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
An arbitrator ruled that nine part-time city recreation workers who were fired last year for double-dipping in government salaries must be reinstated and awarded back pay. In December, Inspector General Amy Kurland found that 13 part-time recreation leaders had violated the city's dual government jobs ban by working for other agencies while on the city payroll. They included 10 full-time teachers, two U.S. Postal Service workers, and an investigator for the state Attorney General's Office.
NEWS
April 30, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Imagine: A Berkshire Hills back road on a scenic summer evening in 1974. One of my best friends is at the wheel, Zep is on the eight-track, and the skunky musk of marijuana is in the air. The guy in the back exhales and hands me a torpedo-size joint. "This stuff," he says languorously, "should be sold as a cure for cancer. " Forty years later, one might think such a marketing campaign is actually happening. The Garden State is among 20 that have authorized the sale of medical marijuana for palliative purposes, which I heartily support.
SPORTS
April 10, 2014 | BY ANDREW ALBERT, Daily News Staff Writer alberta@phillynews.com
FORMER UNIVERSITY of North Carolina and NBA star Kenny Smith was in Philadelphia yesterday. He, along with Coors Light, donated $25,000 to the Urban League of Philadelphia as part of the Coors Light Full Court Refresh program. The money will be used to restore the Leon H. Sullivan Center at 3601 N. Broad Street. The likes of actor Kevin Hart, University of South Carolina women's basketball coach Dawn Staley and NBA players Markieff and Marcus Morris have played at the Sullivan Center, which is a part of the Zion Baptist Church.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON A prime author of New Jersey's medical marijuana law wants the state now to emulate Colorado and legalize the recreational use of pot by adults. Citing the windfall Colorado is enjoying from marijuana sales, State Sen. Nick Scutari (D., Union) announced Monday that he had drafted a bill to legalize marijuana for recreational use and hoped to get it assigned to a committee as soon as possible and then posted for a vote. New York and Rhode Island have similar bills in legislative committees.
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