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NEWS
January 4, 2004
Last week, U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft finally bestirred himself to do a proper thing. He recused himself personally from involvement in an investigation of whether Bush administration officials leaked the name of a CIA agent to a syndicated columnist. Any leak would violate a federal law meant to protect American covert operatives. The Robert Novak column was part of a conservative effort to discredit the agent's husband, Joseph Wilson, a former ambassador who had exposed as dubious the administration's key claim about Saddam Hussein's nuclear weapons program.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Twice in one week, Kevin Hopkins Smith, a candidate for county commissioner and a county hearing officer for trash-related disputes, was asked to recuse himself from hearing a case. The first time he said he would; the second time he refused. On Monday, as a hearing involving Galante Hauling Inc. of Glenmoore was about to start, Galante's attorney, George J. D'Ambrosio, asked Smith to step down, citing the appearance of a conflict of interest. D'Ambrosio acknowledged that there were no specific canons of ethics that apply to hearing officers.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
Gov. Christie denies any hypocrisy in his nomination of a gay lawyer to the New Jersey Supreme Court, but he hasn't been very persuasive. The nomination of Chatham Mayor Bruce Harris to the state's highest court was unexpected given Christie's opposition to legislation that would make gay marriage legal in New Jersey. Christie's motives became even murkier Monday when he announced that if Harris is confirmed by the state Senate, he would recuse himself from any cases involving gay marriage.
NEWS
August 18, 2009 | By JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
The trial of William J. Barnes, who is charged with first-degree murder in the death of a police officer who died 41 years after he was shot and paralyzed, could now be delayed until 2011 following a request made yesterday by his new defense team. Samuel Silver, of Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP, yesterday asked Common Pleas Judge Shelley Robins New to recuse herself from the case, saying that her name appeared on a 1977 state Superior Court decision in the Barnes case. New was then a prosecutor in the District Attorney's Office.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
MUNICIPAL JUDGE Patrick Dugan brushed aside video evidence when he acquitted ex-cop Jonathan Josey on Tuesday of assaulting a woman last September. Does it matter that he's married to a cop? A chorus of criticism swelled Wednesday after word spread that Dugan is married to Philadelphia Police Officer Nancy Farrell Dugan, who has been on the force since 1997, city payroll records show. She also attended Josey's Feb. 12 nonjury trial, sources said. Josey was fired from the police force and charged with simple assault for throwing a punch that knocked down and injured Aida Guzman, 40. Josey testified that he thought she had thrown water on him and that he swung to knock a beer bottle from her hand at 5th Street and Lehigh Avenue during revelry following the city's annual Puerto Rican Day Parade on Sept.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Troy Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Attorney General's office has asked a judge to reverse his decision to suppress evidence in a drunk driving case against state Rep. Cherelle Parker and then recuse himself because he and Parker are Facebook friends. Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Charles Hayden tossed the evidence earlier this month, calling into question the credibility of the arresting officers and their explanation for why they stopped Parker. Without the evidence, the case would have to be dropped.
NEWS
October 25, 2000 | By Kelly Wolfe, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A local judge will not be forced to withdraw from the case of a Downingtown man accused of killing his wife in February. In an order filed Monday in Chester County Court, Senior Judge John E. Backenstoe of Lehigh County Court, who had been appointed to hear the arguments, denied a defense attorney's motion requesting that James P. MacElree recuse himself in the case of Joseph Wallace 3rd. MacElree and attorneys on both sides were not available...
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | By Matt Archbold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The long-awaited, frequently delayed Civil Service Commission hearing that pits former Police Chief Kenneth Veit against the Borough of North Wales began Wednesday night with three Civil Service commissioners presiding. It ended with only two. Carol Sweeney, of the Lansdale law firm of Kerns, Onorato & Associates, fired the opening shots of the evening by offering two motions. She first argued that Veit had been denied due process because he was not afforded a hearing before his termination and demanded his immediate reinstatement.
NEWS
October 9, 1997 | By Rachel Smolkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Chester County judge yesterday refused to recuse himself in the case against two men charged in a June 1 double homicide. Defense attorneys for Gary L. Brown, 24, of West Chester, and Daryl Glasco, 23, of Coatesville, last week asked Judge James P. MacElree 2d to take himself off the case because he signed a search warrant for Brown's apartment in the 600 block of East Union Street in West Chester. The men are charged with the fatal shootings of Ty D. Sacksith, 23, of Coatesville, and Saysana "Sayse" Laomoi, 16, of West Chester.
NEWS
August 27, 2009
Common Pleas Judge Shelley Robins New did recuse herself from a case involving William J. Barnes. An editorial yesterday incorrectly said the judge had declined to recuse herself.
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NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
Under pressure for an apparent conflict of interest as he guided the fate of a controversial child sex-abuse bill, Sen. Stewart Greenleaf announced Saturday that he had decided to step away entirely from the measure that has pitted victims against the Catholic Church. The surprise announcement drew praise from supporters who were afraid of reports that Greenleaf was planning to strip the bill of its most contentious provision: language that would let victims sue attackers and institutions for abuse that happened as far back as the 1970s.
NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that former Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille was wrong to participate in an appeal from a death-row inmate whose prosecution he oversaw nearly three decades before. In a 5-3 split, the justices ordered a new hearing for Terrance Williams, finding that Castille's involvement in hearing the case when it came before the Pennsylvania Supreme Court in 2014 violated Williams' constitutional rights. The decision served as a sharp rebuke to Castille, one of the Pennsylvania legal system's most towering figures in recent years.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Memo to the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority from Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board hearing examiner Jack E. Marino: Get over it. Marino didn't use those words in his 18-page opinion, in which he declined to recuse himself from considering unfair labor practice charges filed against the authority by the Carpenters union after it lost working jurisdiction in the center in May 2014. But they convey his meaning. "Unfavorable rulings are the very nature of our business," Marino wrote.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board hearing examiner Jack E. Marino promised Monday to consider whether he should step aside in a high-profile case involving two unions ousted from the Convention Center. Marino's statement came after an hour-long hearing in which a lawyer for the Convention Center accused him of raising an "appearance of impropriety" that undercut the board's decision-making credibility. Lawyer David L. Hackett cited as evidence comments from Philly.com saying that "the fix is in" after Marino made a decision that kept alive the hopes of the ousted unions - the Metropolitan Regional Council of Carpenters and the Teamsters - to regain work they lost in the center in May 2014.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The debate over a proposed natural-gas pipeline through the New Jersey Pinelands took a surprising turn Friday when Pinelands Commission member Edward Lloyd - who 10 days earlier had raised concerns about the approval process - announced that the state Attorney General's Office had instructed him to recuse himself from further deliberations because of a possible conflict of interest. "I don't think I have a conflict," Lloyd said during a morning meeting of the commission. "I never asked for this.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A preliminary hearing scheduled for Tuesday in the closely watched criminal case against XTO Energy in connection with a 2010 Marcellus Shale wastewater spill has been postponed after the Lycoming County magistrate recused himself. District Judge Jon E. Kemp recused himself Friday afternoon, according to his office in Muncy. He did not provide a reason, but there had been discussions in his court over whether he should withdraw from the case over gas-drilling leases he may have on his own property.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Attorneys for a former Montgomery County housing developer have appealed to the state Superior Court to have the entire county judicial bench recused in a 19-year-old lawsuit over an unpaid bill. The argument centers on Thomas C. Branca, who represented carpeting contractor Roy Lomas until Branca was elected to the county court in 2001. Branca passed the case to another firm and negotiated a referral fee - a common practice when lawyers ascend to the bench. The defendant, James B. Kravitz, argues that he did not know about the referral fee when he agreed to have Branca's colleague, Judge Thomas P. Rogers, decide the case in a nonjury trial.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Dana Milbank
As the nation's top law-enforcement official, Eric Holder is privy to all kinds of sensitive information. But he seems to be proud of how little he knows. Why didn't his Justice Department inform the Associated Press, as the law requires, before pawing through reporters' phone records? "I do not know," the attorney general told the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday afternoon, "why that was or was not done. I simply don't have a factual basis to answer that question. " Why didn't the DOJ seek the AP's cooperation, as the law also requires, before issuing subpoenas?
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Hamza Hendawi and Aya Batrawy, Associated Press
CAIRO - The judge in Hosni Mubarak's retrial recused himself at the start of the first session on Saturday, citing a conflict of interest as the former Egyptian president appeared in court for the first time in 10 months grinning and waving to supporters. The recusal threw the case deeper into disarray after an appeals court in January overturned a life sentence for Mubarak on a conviction for failing to prevent the killings of protesters during the 2011 uprising that ousted him. The appeals court granted Mubarak a retrial after ruling that in the first trial, the prosecution's case lacked concrete evidence and failed to prove that protesters were killed by the police during the bloodiest days of the revolt.
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