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NEWS
December 3, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia start-up company that awards coupons to people who recycle has struck a deal to offer that service to more than 100,000 New England households next year, with the potential for millions more East Coast customers in the years to come. Meanwhile in Philadelphia, the birthplace of RecycleBank, city officials have not yet committed to the program after nine months of trying it out for free. The Streets Department is to decide in January whether to expand - and start paying for - the popular program, currently available only in parts of Chestnut Hill and West Oak Lane.
NEWS
June 30, 2008 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The proposed recycling program sounded good in theory, but Cherry Hill Mayor Bernie Platt wasn't sure how residents would respond to it. He began a test project in a few neighborhoods in October and was stunned by the results. The amount of recyclable materials collected there increased 90 percent. "People were thrilled, and we began getting calls from others all over town asking why they didn't have" the program, Platt said. "The response was so tremendous we made the decision to go townwide.
NEWS
December 10, 2005
Philadelphia, once a trendsetter in recycling, is on the verge of missing out on the latest innovation. The city is reluctant to expand a wildly popular program in Chestnut Hill and West Oak Lane that rewards people who recycle with coupons to local businesses. Cash for trash. People love it. While the city hems and haws, a $500 million Vermont waste-hauling company has signed a Philadelphia-based firm, RecycleBank, to introduce this program it devised to more than 100,000 New England homes.
NEWS
March 8, 2008 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Cherry Hill Township Council is expected to approve on Monday a Green Action Plan that would use a reward system to encourage recycling, conservation and energy efficiency. As part of the program, proposed by Mayor Bernie Platt, residents would earn "RecycleBank dollars" based on the weight of their recycled material. The dollars would be redeemable in stores including Ikea and Staples. Homeowners would be issued a wheeled recycling container embedded with a microchip that contains an online account number.
NEWS
April 21, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lori Braunstein hopes to put Cherry Hill on the map. Not for its sprawl of retail temples or its many luxury-car dealerships. For its eco-consciousness. "Cherry Hill wouldn't be the first town you think of as a leader in environmental issues, but we really can be," said Braunstein, who leads a fledgling environmental group in town. "It's a very consumer-driven, affluent community. We don't want to make people feel bad about that, but we want to help people gradually change their behavior.
NEWS
November 15, 2007 | By Anthony L. Crisci
Next year, Pennsylvania will celebrate the 20th anniversary of curbside recycling in the commonwealth. The program, signed into law by Gov. Robert P. Casey in 1988, has grown to include more than nine million residents in 1,364 municipalities across the state. Recycling has become a household habit that most people practice every day. As we celebrate America Recycles Day today, it is a great time to remember that this good habit needs to be reinforced and expanded to achieve even more waste reduction, energy savings and employment opportunities for our citizens.
NEWS
May 21, 2006 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In Clayton, recycling has its own rewards. There is a virtuous feeling that comes from knowing that recycling all those beer and soda bottles, newspapers, cardboard, glass jars and aluminum cans is good for the environment. And, considering that the landfill charges about $73 a ton, the less that goes to the landfill is good news for the municipal budget. Recycling is also the law. But Joe Abate, Clayton's recycling coordinator, thinks that a carrot is more effective than a stick: His town is offering financial rewards.
NEWS
December 10, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bob Shalala says he's too old to use a computer to sign up for Philadelphia's new incentive-based recycling program. So the retired Philadelphia police officer opted for the telephone version instead. Which meant he sat through a recording that he timed at nearly 32 minutes. Which, perhaps not surprisingly, infuriated him. Him and, in all likelihood, more than a few others. The rewards program, which will begin next year, was announced last Thursday. As of Tuesday, 621 people had signed up by phone with RecycleBank, which is administering the program.
NEWS
March 11, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
A $5 discount on a $40 purchase at ShopRite. A break on admission to the Please Touch Museum. Or a lottery for four movie tickets. These are some of the discounts offered under the Recycling Rewards program that the city is rolling out citywide over the next few months. Mayor Nutter last week said that residents could earn enough rewards through the program to offset some or all of his proposed $300 annual trash fee. But just how easy will it be to get these rewards? The program, run by the city and a private firm called RecycleBank, works like this: You get a sticker to put on your recycling bin, which is scanned each week.
NEWS
November 15, 2006
For many people, recycling is like getting the mail. It's just something you do every day. They've grown accustomed to dragging bins of plastic, glass and aluminum to the curb. They regularly bag newspapers and save cardboard. Today - America Recycles Day - is just another day to them. In many people, especially children, recycling awakens a greater environmental consciousness. They ask: What else can I do to lessen my impact on the planet? How can I urge government to protect us all?
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NEWS
March 11, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
A $5 discount on a $40 purchase at ShopRite. A break on admission to the Please Touch Museum. Or a lottery for four movie tickets. These are some of the discounts offered under the Recycling Rewards program that the city is rolling out citywide over the next few months. Mayor Nutter last week said that residents could earn enough rewards through the program to offset some or all of his proposed $300 annual trash fee. But just how easy will it be to get these rewards? The program, run by the city and a private firm called RecycleBank, works like this: You get a sticker to put on your recycling bin, which is scanned each week.
NEWS
December 10, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bob Shalala says he's too old to use a computer to sign up for Philadelphia's new incentive-based recycling program. So the retired Philadelphia police officer opted for the telephone version instead. Which meant he sat through a recording that he timed at nearly 32 minutes. Which, perhaps not surprisingly, infuriated him. Him and, in all likelihood, more than a few others. The rewards program, which will begin next year, was announced last Thursday. As of Tuesday, 621 people had signed up by phone with RecycleBank, which is administering the program.
NEWS
October 9, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Energy-saving LED lights in 85,000 traffic signals. Solar panels at a city sewage treatment plant. Energy-efficiency upgrades at some buildings. These are a few of the fruits of a $14.1 million grant for Philadelphia announced yesterday by the U.S. Department of Energy. The big-ticket item is nearly $5.8 million for grants and low-interest loans to help businesses and industries retrofit buildings to be more energy-efficient. But the wow factor for many in the city's environmental community was the $700,000 earmarked for expanding citywide the incentive-based recycling program, run by the private company RecycleBank.
NEWS
September 16, 2008 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cherry Hill envisions its township building as becoming the poster child for energy efficiency and sustainability. There will be solar panels to provide electricity; rain barrels to collect free water; fuel-conserving vehicles in the parking lot; and heat, air-conditioning and lighting upgrades, plus a recently enlarged recycling program. "Everything we do here can be done at home," said Dan Keashen, spokesman for Mayor Bernie Platt. "The best part is, it's a cost-saving measure: It makes the taxpayers' money go further.
NEWS
June 30, 2008 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The proposed recycling program sounded good in theory, but Cherry Hill Mayor Bernie Platt wasn't sure how residents would respond to it. He began a test project in a few neighborhoods in October and was stunned by the results. The amount of recyclable materials collected there increased 90 percent. "People were thrilled, and we began getting calls from others all over town asking why they didn't have" the program, Platt said. "The response was so tremendous we made the decision to go townwide.
NEWS
April 21, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lori Braunstein hopes to put Cherry Hill on the map. Not for its sprawl of retail temples or its many luxury-car dealerships. For its eco-consciousness. "Cherry Hill wouldn't be the first town you think of as a leader in environmental issues, but we really can be," said Braunstein, who leads a fledgling environmental group in town. "It's a very consumer-driven, affluent community. We don't want to make people feel bad about that, but we want to help people gradually change their behavior.
NEWS
March 8, 2008 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Cherry Hill Township Council is expected to approve on Monday a Green Action Plan that would use a reward system to encourage recycling, conservation and energy efficiency. As part of the program, proposed by Mayor Bernie Platt, residents would earn "RecycleBank dollars" based on the weight of their recycled material. The dollars would be redeemable in stores including Ikea and Staples. Homeowners would be issued a wheeled recycling container embedded with a microchip that contains an online account number.
NEWS
November 15, 2007 | By Anthony L. Crisci
Next year, Pennsylvania will celebrate the 20th anniversary of curbside recycling in the commonwealth. The program, signed into law by Gov. Robert P. Casey in 1988, has grown to include more than nine million residents in 1,364 municipalities across the state. Recycling has become a household habit that most people practice every day. As we celebrate America Recycles Day today, it is a great time to remember that this good habit needs to be reinforced and expanded to achieve even more waste reduction, energy savings and employment opportunities for our citizens.
NEWS
November 24, 2006
Delta gets the bags Re: "US Airways bids $8B for Delta," Nov. 15: I'm in favor of the US Airways-Delta merger under one condition: Delta employees must handle the baggage in Philadelphia! Carl Witonsky Bryn Mawr Cwitonsky@cs.com The zoo recycles Thanks for a timely reminder of why it's important to recycle and how easy it really is ("America Recycles Day," Nov. 15). It's especially exciting to see what school children are doing to help save the environment.
NEWS
November 15, 2006
For many people, recycling is like getting the mail. It's just something you do every day. They've grown accustomed to dragging bins of plastic, glass and aluminum to the curb. They regularly bag newspapers and save cardboard. Today - America Recycles Day - is just another day to them. In many people, especially children, recycling awakens a greater environmental consciousness. They ask: What else can I do to lessen my impact on the planet? How can I urge government to protect us all?
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