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Recycling

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NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The funeral director was discussing cremation with the bereaved family. When she told them that their father's artificial joint would be removed from the ashes and sent to a facility where the metal would be recycled, the mood brightened. "Dad was all about recycling," the mourners told Maryeileen Appio, manager of the Kirk & Nice funeral home in Plymouth Meeting. Appio recalled their saying, "He'd be thrilled that one of the last things he could do was have some parts recycled.
NEWS
June 24, 1987
Mayor Goode took the sensible option yesterday, when he signed City Council's mandatory trash recycling bill. He did it in spite of inflated figures of just how much the local trash stream will be reduced by recycling, as well as concerns about program management and specific roles to be played by city and private haulers. But Council is still a day late and a trash-to-steam plant short when it comes to real solutions for Philadelphia's trash crisis. Recycling is important, but it's only a supplemental measure - part of an overall plan that Council lacks the nerve or the good sense to fully implement.
NEWS
August 6, 2003
WITH ALL the talk about the impending demolition of Veterans Stadium, I wonder if anyone in City Hall is asking if the Vet could be more of an asset than a liability? You have to assume that if the powers that be figure the Vet has to go, then this means they consider this immense facility a liability. Or was it simply taken for granted that if we built two new stadiums, the "old" one had to go? Recycling, as a philosophy, doesn't apply just to soda bottles, even on this scale.
NEWS
May 6, 1986
To the municipal melodrama over building a giant trash plant at the Navy Shipyard, add this quiet, but insistent subplot: There are some people in this city who would like to see Philadelphia doing a whole lot more about refuse recyling - a purported, but meagerly supported, project of the Goode administration. One is City Councilman Edward A. Schwartz, who two weeks ago lambasted the mayor for giving recycling short shrift. Even if a trash plant is approved - and so far that looks like the best of a diminishing list of long-term solutions - Mr. Schwartz points out it "won't do a damn thing to solve the problems we face today.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The city giveth, and the city taketh away. As recycling trucks finally begin pickups south of Cottman Avenue, the recycling schedule will be cut north of Cottman. Starting Dec. 7, the city will pick up newspapers, glass bottles and metal cans from homes in Tacony, Wissinoming, Mayfair, Oxford Circle, Lawndale and Crescentville. In preparation, starting Nov. 9, the weekly recycling schedule will be cut to every other week for 159,245 households already recycling in the Northeast and northwest Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 20, 1987 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
State senators and business groups were trying yesterday to come up with compromise language to avoid a fight over a key section of Gov. Casey's mandatory-recycling legislation. The Senate took up the bill yesterday and approved an amendment giving local governments greater freedom in deciding what sort of materials homeowners would be compelled to recycle. But the sponsor of the bill, Sen. D. Michael Fisher (R., Allegheny), said the big fight over the legislation would come today.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Concerns about recycling in Rose Valley have prompted the Borough Council to form a committee to study the borough's options for collecting material to be recycled. "I think we're going to be forced into it," said borough manager Paula Healy at the council meeting Wednesday night. Residents now take glass to a local fire company for recycling and use recycling bins in neighboring towns for newspapers. The state's Act 101 requires that municipalities with more than 10,000 residents set up recycling programs by September.
NEWS
October 2, 1987 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
Democratic freeholder candidates Ted Costa and Mary Anne Reinhart yesterday accused their incumbent opponents and the three other Burlington County freeholders of wasting taxpayers' money to build unnecessary and costly recycling plants. Costa and Reinhart said in a news release that the freeholders had refused to use existing privately run recycling stations, although state law required that local governments include private companies in their recycling plans. This is the second attack in a week that the Democrats have made on the freeholders' fiscal management of taxpayers' money.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | By Gina Esposito, Special to The Inquirer
Charles T. Duffy has some good news for Aldan Borough Council members about the borough's paper-recycling program. The borough did not have to pay in February to have the paper it had collected recycled, said Duffy, chairman of the Sanitation Committee, at a council caucus meeting Wednesday. In January, the borough was asked by Pasco Inc. of Philadelphia to pay $5 a ton to have its paper recycled. In February, Pasco did not charge the borough anything for recycling. Last summer, Pasco paid the borough $15 a ton to recycle its paper.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
Although it has no legal obligation to, Hulmeville Borough may decide to start recycling in 1991. The subject came up at Monday night's Borough Council meeting, when the borough awarded its new contract for residential trash removal to the low bidder, Waste Automation Corp. Waste Automation now hauls Hulmeville's trash, without recycling, at a cost of about $42,000 a year. If recycling is included, the new contract would cost $94,159, or $47,079 per year, over the two-year period.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 8, 2016
That's a wrap Instead of using plastic wrap to cover bowls, store sandwiches, and wrap cheese - and then throwing it away - consider a reusable, natural alternative. Bee's Wrap is washable, made with beeswax and cloth. The warmth of your hands is enough to mold and seal it into place. - Samantha Melamed Bee's Wrap, $19 for a set of three 10-by-11-inch wraps at Kitchenette, 117 S. 12th St., Philadelphia, 215-829-4949 Pizza that goes against the grain If you're off gluten but still craving pizza, Smart Flour Foods' version, with a crisp crust made of amaranth, sorghum, and teff, might help you climb back from the brink of despair.
NEWS
May 31, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
From the front gate, Revolution Recovery looks like any other dump. Trucks are constantly pulling off I-95 and unloading mini-mountains of junk - about 350 tons a day. But the Northeast Philadelphia recycling center also is an established wellspring of creativity through the nonprofit Recycled Artist in Residency (RAIR), founded in 2010. Now, with the help of a $60,000 grant from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, the recycling dump has become a performance venue where RAIR continues to blur the lines between trash and art, and raise awareness about sustainability.
NEWS
March 3, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A worker at a Waste Management recycling plant in Holmesburg was killed Tuesday morning when a ton of paper fell on him, police said in a news release Tuesday afternoon. Police said that shortly before 7:30 a.m., the 42-year-old man was "performing a routine inspection of his forklift" near "large bales of tightly packed recyclable paper" when another worker operating a forklift nearby hit the bales of cardboard, and "in a cascade effect," one of the large bales toppled onto the victim.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Examples of what Burlington County households and small businesses should - and shouldn't - put in their big blue recycling tubs: WHAT GOES IN: Newspapers; junk mail; paperback books; brown bags; school and office paper; "gray" paperboard, such as tissue and cereal boxes; plastics marked with the recycling symbol (three rotating arrows) surrounding the numbers 1, 2 and 5. (The types of plastic found in most consumer products, these typically include milk jugs, soda bottles, "clamshell" berry boxes, and yogurt cups.)
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Where do you suppose that Champagne bottle is you uncorked on New Year's Eve? And whatever did you do with the cork? The molded Styrofoam that delivered your new laptop, the cardboard cup from Starbucks that held this morning's latte, the Sunday Inquirer, Friday's pizza box greasy with pepperoni, the aluminum foil that wrapped the turkey, and that string of Christmas lights that blinked out over the weekend: Where are they now? If you live in Burlington County, chances are good that your recent paper, metal, plastic and glass trail has been dumped, tumbled, crushed, and flattened, scanned by infrared light, puffed by air jets, and sorted by magnets at a plant in Westampton.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for a group of China-based scrap-metal recyclers have asked a federal court in New Jersey to return $5.5 million in cash, a Porsche Cayman Coupe, and a Texas warehouse, all seized last winter during a Homeland Security probe of worn coins sold to the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia. Federal border control agents acted illegally when they decided the worn coins were fakes and seized the mint's payments to Wealthy Max Ltd., America Naha Inc., and XRacer Sports Co. Ltd., along with the car and warehouse, their lawyer, Bradford L. Geyer wrote in a filing asking a federal judge in Newark to dismiss the case.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The corridor near the vacant fish market still smells like fish, and the area by the vanished food court still smells like grease. Soon even the odors of the Gallery will be gone, as the developer prepares to undertake a massive internal demolition and knock the inside of the mall to pieces. The work probably will start in late September. The mountains of broken material won't all be headed to landfills. More likely, experts said, tons of metal and concrete will be sold and recycled.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2015 | Jenelle Janci, Daily News Staff Writer
A CROCODILE made of bubblegum, a giant gorilla composed of car parts and tiny creatures carved from crayons are all trying to tell you something: Recycling is important, and our everyday actions have an effect on our friends in the animal kingdom. "Second Nature," opening Saturday, is the Philadelphia Zoo's latest feature experience. The exhibit's name holds a two-pronged meaning: Trash gets a second life in art pieces, and recycling can become "second nature" to humans. "Second Nature" is free with regular zoo admission.
REAL_ESTATE
March 15, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Living in an 1835 Society Hill townhouse might spur some people to decorate to suit that period. Not Yvonne Novak and Aaron Weindling, who say they don't want to fill their 180-year-old home on South Seventh Street with Chippendale furniture and wingback chairs. "It is our home and not a museum. Antique sofas are hard to find, expensive, and not very comfortable," Novak says. "We have chosen to adopt a combination of previously owned and new things that fit our space and our lifestyle.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THE BAMBIEBOTZ girls are building a 6-foot-tall recycling robot that will be able to maneuver a plastic garbage can, pile crates and dispose of swimming-pool noodles. When they're done later this month, it will compete against other remote-controlled recycling robots in the 2015 FIRST - For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology - Robotics Challenge. Win or lose, the BambieBotz team that created it at St. Hubert Catholic High School for Girls in Northeast Philadelphia will gain something that their volunteer mentor, Jeanine Heck, is thrilled about - the idea that engineering can be a real-life career.
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