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Recycling

NEWS
September 6, 2011
ALL BUSINESSES in Philadelphia must file a recycling plan with the Streets Department's Recycling Office. Here's what you do: 1. Tell your private hauler that you want to recycle. Ask about rebates, since they can make money off your materials. 2. Go to secure.phila. gov/streets/commrecycling/. 3. Fill in basic location and contact information, your account number from the Office of Property Assessment, the name of the private hauler you use and a list of all materials that you plan to recycle.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2011 | By SHAUN BRADY, For the Daily News
PULLING HIS PICKUP truck alongside a 60-foot-long, 5-foot-wide trough filled with yellowish-brown grain, Gary Schuler cracks a small smile and softly says, "I call it my golden feedbowl. " Given that a few moments later he refers to a nearby mound of manure as "black gold" and a manure spreader he once used to distribute vegetable trimmings to his grazing herds as a "salad shooter," it's clear that Schuler has a penchant for wryly colorful euphemisms. But the grain filling that mammoth trough is something special, one stop on a cyclic chain that Schuler refers to as "beer, barley and buffalo.
NEWS
May 27, 2011
More than 80 percent of Philadelphia's households do not recycle, and nearly 80 percent of the city's voters didn't bother to vote last Tuesday. Mayor Nutter has asked us to recycle so the city can save almost $30 million a year - and that would be if just 30 percent complied. We can save money and improve air quality at the same time: Tons of refuse are incinerated here. The Recycle Bank partnership has helped, but we are still missing an opportunity. Similarly, Andy Toy, who ran in the Democratic primary for an at-large City Council seat, wanted to cut Council salaries by a third (to make up for its recesses)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The environment is the centerpiece of Earth Day activities Friday at the Academy of Natural Sciences. The Earth Day Festival, scheduled for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., will allow visitors to participate in activities that include the chance for guests to become Academy scientists by conducting water-testing experiments. Visitors can dissect fish during the Fish Filet event, play games, and also learn how to keep habitats healthy. At 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., there will be an 11-minute episode of "Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That," followed by a live animal show.
NEWS
April 19, 2011
ONE RECENT morning while walking my dog, I noticed a vehicle stopped by my rear driveway. It was a Sweeps Department vehicle (the trash and recycling police), for the Streets Department of Philadelphia. I also noticed a female occupant of the vehicle get out and start to look over the trash put out by a neighbor who had just moved in days before. I approached and informed her that they had just moved in from out of town, and probably did not have a chance to pick up a recycling bin. She ignored me and proceeded to write out a fine to our new neighbor.
NEWS
April 11, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials on Monday celebrated the opening of a sophisticated recycling plant in Northeast Philadelphia that will employ over 70 people once fully staffed and process more than 20,000 tons of discarded materials each month. Houston, Texas-based Waste Management Inc., spent more than $20 million on the, 60,000-square-foot center on the 5200 block of Bleigh Avenue, which serves the City of Philadelphia and other communities, the company said. The plant has been ramping up its operations since December and is nearly fully staffed, said company spokesman George McGrath.
NEWS
March 23, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The level of salty compounds in the Monongahela River south of Pittsburgh spiked above acceptable limits in late 2008 - not a health risk, according to federal and state regulators, but drinking water drawn from the river tasted like mud. Environmentalists blamed the contamination on Marcellus Shale gas-drilling discharges. Natural-gas drillers pointed to other sources in the historically stressed river: pollutants from coal mines and other industrial discharges. Which source was to blame didn't really matter.
NEWS
March 12, 2011 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
TV series are like the tubercular poets of yore: They pass too soon. Especially the good ones. As a result, prime-time actors tend to show up again and again, commandeering a new horse as soon as their current one falters. It feels like William Shatner, Sarah Chalke, Greg Grunberg, Holland Taylor, Jimmy Smits, Scott Bakula, Dana Delany, Jerry O'Connell, Kyle Chandler, Gerald McRaney, Scott Wolf, Michael Chiklis, Heather Locklear, Eric Close, and others are always with us. The absolute king of this phenomenon is the late Robert Urich, who starred in everything but The Jeffersons . Urich was recycled more times than a SunnyD jug. Usually, familiarity does not breed contempt.
NEWS
January 8, 2011 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marking the end of his holiday season, Jerry Hoggard of Northeast Philadelphia put his family's Christmas tree in the back of his pickup truck and hauled it away. Hoggard, who in the past set his natural Christmas tree curbside on rubbish-collection day, took an environmentally friendly approach this week, recycling his blue spruce at a Philadelphia Streets Department Sanitation Convenience Center at Domino Lane and Umbria Street in the Shawmont section. "This is the first time I brought a tree down here," said Hoggard, a father of two. "I live in the Northeast, and I normally set it out on the curb, but since I have this truck, I brought it myself.
NEWS
December 31, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It'll soon be time to recycle the Christmas tree, and here's a fun, nontraditional way to do that: Take the tree outside, lean it against a wall or deck or toss it on the ground, and load it up with homemade, edible "ornaments" that birds and possibly other creatures can enjoy. The idea is known as "trim-a-tree for wildlife," and it "makes for a special family event, especially at this time of year," says Molly Sahner, a Bucks County stay-at-home mother with two children. With their natural food supply dwindling or hidden under snow, birds and other animals can get hungry in winter.
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