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Red Auerbach

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November 3, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Boston Celtics president Red Auerbach has always bled green - as in the team's uniform color. But Auerbach also is a huge fan of 76ers point guard Allen Iverson, both as a person and a player. Auerbach, who won nine NBA titles as the Celtics coach, has presided over 16 championships in some executive capacity with the team. So he knows talent when he sees it. Auerbach, a Washington, D.C. resident, followed Iverson when the Sixers guard played at Georgetown. During Iverson's rookie year, 1996-97, Auerbach coached him in the NBA Rookie Game during the all-star break.
SPORTS
October 4, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Red Auerbach is again the Boston Celtics' team president, a title he held for 27 years before it was given to former coach Rick Pitino. "We thought it was right and proper," Celtics spokesman Jeff Twiss said yesterday. "It was returning it to its rightful owner, in a sense. " The 84-year-old Auerbach was head coach of the Celtics from 1950-66, winning nine NBA titles. He served as general manager from 1950-84, and president from 1970-97. When Pitino arrived in 1997, Auerbach became vice chairman of the board and Pitino assumed duties as president.
SPORTS
May 28, 1986 | By PHIL JASNER, Daily News Sports Writer
Atlanta's Mike Fratello was chosen as the NBA's coach of the year. Red Auerbach says it should have been Boston's K.C. Jones. "K.C. should have been coach of the year a couple of times," said Auerbach, the Boston Celtics' president and resident legend. "But the way the voting has been, it's become a popularity contest. I'm not taking anything away from Fratello or anyone else, but it sometimes seems like the worst thing you can do is win. Like Pat Riley with the (Los Angeles)
SPORTS
April 22, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Most Boston Celtics memories are Boston Garden memories, and many of the players who helped create them returned to the building a final time last night to say goodbye to their old home. Larry Bird was there. So were Bob Cousy, Bill Sharman, Bill Russell, John Havlicek and a host of other Celtics greats. Each was honored during halftime of the Celtics' final regular-season game in the Garden, a 99-92 loss to the New York Knicks. "It's a mixed-emotions type of thing," Celtics spokesman Jeffrey Twiss said.
SPORTS
April 26, 2013 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
GAME 7, 1965 Eastern Conference finals, 76ers down 110-109, inbounding the ball under their own basket in the Boston Garden with 5 seconds remaining. If you are a longtime Sixers fans, nothing more needs to be said. The scenario alone should still make you queasy, give you nightmares and make you hate the sound of Johnny Most's voice. You know what comes next. Havlicek stole the frickin' ball. The Sixers prepared for such a moment with the acquisition of Wilt Chamberlain just a few months earlier.
SPORTS
April 15, 2007 | By David Aldridge INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They dressed the same last week in a seeming show of solidarity, women that had come together - first on the basketball court and then when they were thrust into a different spotlight. That the Rutgers women's basketball team met the challenge and, through its dignity, showed the country that there were no "nappy-headed ho's" there of any race was a tribute both to the team and its coach, C. Vivian Stringer, who became Rutgers' de facto spokeswoman. In doing so, she joined a list of coaches that have had to suddenly deal with events that had nothing to do with X's and O's. In some cases, it would have been better to deal with something as relatively insignificant as a shock jock's words.
SPORTS
November 2, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Their philosophies were as different as offense and defense, but Danny Ainge maintains that there is no bitterness toward 76ers coach Jim O'Brien. When the 76ers open their season tomorrow in Boston against the Celtics, some may portray the game as a grudge match between former boss and employee. That would be an inaccurate portrayal, according to Ainge, the Celtics' director of basketball operations. In January, with the Celtics at 22-24 and Ainge wading through his first year as an NBA executive, O'Brien abruptly resigned.
SPORTS
May 13, 1992 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Cleveland Cavaliers will take on the Boston Celtics in Game 5 of a best-of-seven Eastern Conference semifinal tonight without the slightest worry about the return of Larry Bird or their own reputation for gagging in postseason play. For two reasons. The Cavs will be on their turf, Richfield Coliseum, with the series tied at two games apiece. And that 114-112 overtime victory at Boston Garden on Sunday adjusted their thinking a bit. They are playing to win instead of playing not to lose.
SPORTS
August 29, 2012
The turmoil that Bill O'Brien is trying to navigate in his first season as Joe Paterno's successor is unprecedented. While it is impossible to be all-conclusive, here is a look at some other coaching icons and the men who followed them: RED AUERBACH, BOSTON CELTICS, 1950-66: Built the Celtics dynasty and won the NBA championship 8 years in a row before he moved upstairs to become general manager. Best known for victory cigars, which he smoked very frequently back then. The successor: Auerbach appointed star center Bill Russell as player/coach, making him the first African-American to lead an NBA team.
SPORTS
June 9, 1986 | By Mike Bruton, Inquirer Staff Writer
A sellout crowd of more than 14,000 fans came to the Boston Garden yesterday expecting a fight, and a basketball game broke out. Well, sort of. With 35 seconds remaining in the game, Red Auerbach, undoubtedly with cigar already ablaze, was in the dressing room with several of the Boston Celtics drenching himself in champagne. In this, the sixth game of the 1986 NBA finals, the Celtics won their second championship in three years, and the 16th in the franchise's history, by humbling the Houston Rockets, 114-97.
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SPORTS
May 9, 2013 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
No. 25 in a series of 25 SETUP: The 1966-67 Philadelphia 76ers were honored in 1980 as the NBA's greatest team. They went 68-13, setting the NBA record for wins, and won the NBA championship by beating Boston in five games in the Eastern Conference finals and the San Francisco Warriors in six games in the Finals. By the end of the 1965-66 season, the 76ers were fed up with the Boston Celtics. After losing to the men in green 2 straight years, after hearing Johnny Most's effusive fingernails-on-the-blackboard voice recounting John Havlicek's 1965, Game 7 theft countless times, and having the smell of Red Auerbach's victory cigars linger throughout the offseason, the Sixers took action.
SPORTS
April 26, 2013 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
GAME 7, 1965 Eastern Conference finals, 76ers down 110-109, inbounding the ball under their own basket in the Boston Garden with 5 seconds remaining. If you are a longtime Sixers fans, nothing more needs to be said. The scenario alone should still make you queasy, give you nightmares and make you hate the sound of Johnny Most's voice. You know what comes next. Havlicek stole the frickin' ball. The Sixers prepared for such a moment with the acquisition of Wilt Chamberlain just a few months earlier.
SPORTS
August 29, 2012
The turmoil that Bill O'Brien is trying to navigate in his first season as Joe Paterno's successor is unprecedented. While it is impossible to be all-conclusive, here is a look at some other coaching icons and the men who followed them: RED AUERBACH, BOSTON CELTICS, 1950-66: Built the Celtics dynasty and won the NBA championship 8 years in a row before he moved upstairs to become general manager. Best known for victory cigars, which he smoked very frequently back then. The successor: Auerbach appointed star center Bill Russell as player/coach, making him the first African-American to lead an NBA team.
SPORTS
April 15, 2007 | By David Aldridge INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They dressed the same last week in a seeming show of solidarity, women that had come together - first on the basketball court and then when they were thrust into a different spotlight. That the Rutgers women's basketball team met the challenge and, through its dignity, showed the country that there were no "nappy-headed ho's" there of any race was a tribute both to the team and its coach, C. Vivian Stringer, who became Rutgers' de facto spokeswoman. In doing so, she joined a list of coaches that have had to suddenly deal with events that had nothing to do with X's and O's. In some cases, it would have been better to deal with something as relatively insignificant as a shock jock's words.
SPORTS
November 3, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Boston Celtics president Red Auerbach has always bled green - as in the team's uniform color. But Auerbach also is a huge fan of 76ers point guard Allen Iverson, both as a person and a player. Auerbach, who won nine NBA titles as the Celtics coach, has presided over 16 championships in some executive capacity with the team. So he knows talent when he sees it. Auerbach, a Washington, D.C. resident, followed Iverson when the Sixers guard played at Georgetown. During Iverson's rookie year, 1996-97, Auerbach coached him in the NBA Rookie Game during the all-star break.
SPORTS
November 2, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Their philosophies were as different as offense and defense, but Danny Ainge maintains that there is no bitterness toward 76ers coach Jim O'Brien. When the 76ers open their season tomorrow in Boston against the Celtics, some may portray the game as a grudge match between former boss and employee. That would be an inaccurate portrayal, according to Ainge, the Celtics' director of basketball operations. In January, with the Celtics at 22-24 and Ainge wading through his first year as an NBA executive, O'Brien abruptly resigned.
SPORTS
October 4, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Red Auerbach is again the Boston Celtics' team president, a title he held for 27 years before it was given to former coach Rick Pitino. "We thought it was right and proper," Celtics spokesman Jeff Twiss said yesterday. "It was returning it to its rightful owner, in a sense. " The 84-year-old Auerbach was head coach of the Celtics from 1950-66, winning nine NBA titles. He served as general manager from 1950-84, and president from 1970-97. When Pitino arrived in 1997, Auerbach became vice chairman of the board and Pitino assumed duties as president.
SPORTS
April 22, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Most Boston Celtics memories are Boston Garden memories, and many of the players who helped create them returned to the building a final time last night to say goodbye to their old home. Larry Bird was there. So were Bob Cousy, Bill Sharman, Bill Russell, John Havlicek and a host of other Celtics greats. Each was honored during halftime of the Celtics' final regular-season game in the Garden, a 99-92 loss to the New York Knicks. "It's a mixed-emotions type of thing," Celtics spokesman Jeffrey Twiss said.
SPORTS
May 13, 1992 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Cleveland Cavaliers will take on the Boston Celtics in Game 5 of a best-of-seven Eastern Conference semifinal tonight without the slightest worry about the return of Larry Bird or their own reputation for gagging in postseason play. For two reasons. The Cavs will be on their turf, Richfield Coliseum, with the series tied at two games apiece. And that 114-112 overtime victory at Boston Garden on Sunday adjusted their thinking a bit. They are playing to win instead of playing not to lose.
SPORTS
January 2, 1991 | By Timothy Dwyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
This is how bad it is. Derek Smith has been here for less than a week and already he is talking about Celtics Mystique. It is real, he says - there is something magic about wearing the green. This from Charles Barkley's buddy, a former Sixer, an unabashed anti-Celtic from the time he was a kid growing up in Georgia. This after just three days in Celticsland. All of a sudden, he is eating Chinese food (Red Auerbach's favorite) every day. He says it's good for you. He is name-dropping at lunch, talking about his new buddies.
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