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October 22, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
A former college football player at Lock Haven University was sentenced to life in prison because a jury could not agree on whether he deserved the death penalty for murdering the brother of an Olympic wrestler. The jury voted 7-5 in favor of the death penalty yesterday for Fabian Desmond Smart, of Clyo, Ga. Death sentences require a unanimous decision in Pennsylvania. Smart was convicted last week of the January 1999 murder of Jason McMann, the older brother of Olympic wrestler Sara McMann.
NEWS
January 3, 2016
The hematologist obtained several other lab results and called me. The boy would need a blood transfusion and would have to be hospitalized for a day or two. The specialist added several more tests, including one to measure how fast red blood cells called reticulocytes are made by the bone marrow and released into the blood. Reticulocytes are in the blood for about two days before developing into mature red blood cells. The more anemic you are, the higher your reticulocyte count should be. Yet this child's was less then 1 percent, when we would have expected it to be more than 5 percent.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Dr. Robert Fischer, For The Inquirer
In January of 1998, I was at home sitting down to dinner when my pager went off. It was the medical resident on call, saying that she needed me to come to the hospital and look at an abnormal test result on a newly admitted patient. He was an African American man in his late 40s, who had been born in Philadelphia and had never left, with hemoglobin SC disease, a type of sickle-cell disease. Due to this inherited abnormality of his red blood cells, he had undergone removal of his spleen.
NEWS
May 26, 1993 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the more than 50,000 Americans with sickle cell anemia, treatment up to now has been piecemeal efforts to alleviate their pain and try to prevent complications such as infections. Now, scientists are targeting the underlying cause of this deadly inherited disease, which mostly affects black people. It is characterized by defective red blood cells that clog blood vessels and damage organs. At a national meeting on sickle cell disease in Philadelphia this week, researchers were upbeat.
SPORTS
October 30, 1999 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eric Lindros' blood count is low. He is five pounds under his playing weight of 236 pounds. But the Flyers center and team captain said he was relieved to learn that it is a virus that has made him ill and fatigued - and not something more serious. "I've been really concerned about what's going on with me," Lindros said last night from his South Jersey home. "That's why I went to see Dr. [Larry] Kaiser. I wanted to hear it from Kaiser if there was something else. " Kaiser, the chief of thoracic surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, assured Lindros on Thursday that there was no connection between his low count of red blood cells and the virus.
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I'm a nursing student who recently cared for a homeless man who developed alcohol withdrawal and something described as "refeeding syndrome. " Can you tell me more about that? He was pretty sick. Answer: A homeless man is the classic setting where you'll come across "refeeding syndrome. " It can be seen in anyone who is profoundly malnourished. Anorexia is another setting where it has been seen. It was first seen in World War II concentration-camp victims who died soon after refeeding.
NEWS
March 14, 1996 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When 18 Belgian and Dutch bicycle racers mysteriously dropped dead in the late 1980s, doctors suspected a powerful antianemia drug called Erythropoietin, or Epo. But no test existed to prove that the athletes had taken it. Since then, anecdotal evidence suggests that cyclists and other endurance athletes have abused this new drug, hoping its blood-enriching effect would give them a competitive edge, albeit a dangerous and illegal one. ...
NEWS
November 18, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allan J. Erslev, 84, a hematology researcher and professor at Jefferson Medical College for 43 years, died Wednesday at the Quadrangle in Haverford, where he had lived since 1989. In 1953, Dr. Erslev was the first researcher to prove conclusively that erythropoietin - a natural hormone that produces red blood cells - resides in the kidneys. Dr. Erslev and other researchers spent 25 years studying how to mass-produce the hormone, called EPO, through genetic engineering. When the hormone was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1989, it was immediately used to treat patients who needed a boost in red blood cells.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | Mike Vitez
The Inquirer is presenting one profile a day of participants in Sunday's Blue Cross Broad Street Run. See full coverage at www.philly.com/broadstreetrun. By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER In 2009, in his Chester County kitchen, Tom Kramer turned frustration and desperation into inspiration. He would turn what he loved — running, training — into a cause that could save the life of his wife, Pam, and the lives of many like her. Pam has a rare form of blood cancer, myelofibrosis, that eats away at her bone marrow and will eventually be fatal.
NEWS
October 26, 2007 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, in a letter released yesterday, urged state and federal health officials to continue to monitor cases of a rare blood cancer in northeastern Pennsylvania and vowed to find federal funding to support further study. Specter's announcement came a day after a federal health agency announced that a two-year survey found an elevated number of cases of polycythemia vera in Schuylkill, Carbon and Luzerne Counties. But scientists found no link between the disease and toxic chemical dumps in the area.
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NEWS
January 3, 2016
The hematologist obtained several other lab results and called me. The boy would need a blood transfusion and would have to be hospitalized for a day or two. The specialist added several more tests, including one to measure how fast red blood cells called reticulocytes are made by the bone marrow and released into the blood. Reticulocytes are in the blood for about two days before developing into mature red blood cells. The more anemic you are, the higher your reticulocyte count should be. Yet this child's was less then 1 percent, when we would have expected it to be more than 5 percent.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Dr. Robert Fischer, For The Inquirer
In January of 1998, I was at home sitting down to dinner when my pager went off. It was the medical resident on call, saying that she needed me to come to the hospital and look at an abnormal test result on a newly admitted patient. He was an African American man in his late 40s, who had been born in Philadelphia and had never left, with hemoglobin SC disease, a type of sickle-cell disease. Due to this inherited abnormality of his red blood cells, he had undergone removal of his spleen.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Dr. Joseph Hassey, For The Inquirer
Bob was 70 when he developed persistent fever, night sweats, and weight loss. He had recently been admitted to a hospital for evaluation. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed an abnormality of the spleen that was concerning for a lymphoma. He then underwent surgical removal of his spleen. No malignancy was found. He continued to have fever for several more weeks and was sent to me for further evaluation. He had no significant past medical history. He was married and driving a shuttle bus for a car dealership.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | Mike Vitez
The Inquirer is presenting one profile a day of participants in Sunday's Blue Cross Broad Street Run. See full coverage at www.philly.com/broadstreetrun. By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER In 2009, in his Chester County kitchen, Tom Kramer turned frustration and desperation into inspiration. He would turn what he loved — running, training — into a cause that could save the life of his wife, Pam, and the lives of many like her. Pam has a rare form of blood cancer, myelofibrosis, that eats away at her bone marrow and will eventually be fatal.
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I'm a nursing student who recently cared for a homeless man who developed alcohol withdrawal and something described as "refeeding syndrome. " Can you tell me more about that? He was pretty sick. Answer: A homeless man is the classic setting where you'll come across "refeeding syndrome. " It can be seen in anyone who is profoundly malnourished. Anorexia is another setting where it has been seen. It was first seen in World War II concentration-camp victims who died soon after refeeding.
NEWS
October 26, 2007 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, in a letter released yesterday, urged state and federal health officials to continue to monitor cases of a rare blood cancer in northeastern Pennsylvania and vowed to find federal funding to support further study. Specter's announcement came a day after a federal health agency announced that a two-year survey found an elevated number of cases of polycythemia vera in Schuylkill, Carbon and Luzerne Counties. But scientists found no link between the disease and toxic chemical dumps in the area.
SPORTS
October 22, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
A former college football player at Lock Haven University was sentenced to life in prison because a jury could not agree on whether he deserved the death penalty for murdering the brother of an Olympic wrestler. The jury voted 7-5 in favor of the death penalty yesterday for Fabian Desmond Smart, of Clyo, Ga. Death sentences require a unanimous decision in Pennsylvania. Smart was convicted last week of the January 1999 murder of Jason McMann, the older brother of Olympic wrestler Sara McMann.
NEWS
November 18, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allan J. Erslev, 84, a hematology researcher and professor at Jefferson Medical College for 43 years, died Wednesday at the Quadrangle in Haverford, where he had lived since 1989. In 1953, Dr. Erslev was the first researcher to prove conclusively that erythropoietin - a natural hormone that produces red blood cells - resides in the kidneys. Dr. Erslev and other researchers spent 25 years studying how to mass-produce the hormone, called EPO, through genetic engineering. When the hormone was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1989, it was immediately used to treat patients who needed a boost in red blood cells.
NEWS
October 1, 2001 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
To make sure it has sufficient blood supply to treat American casualties in any combat in Afghanistan, the Pentagon may restrict the Red Cross and other civilian groups from collecting blood on military bases. The last time the Defense Department imposed such a restriction was during the 1991 Persian Gulf war. The restriction would help ensure that service personnel would be able to donate blood when it was needed to treat those wounded in combat. "We're trying to make sure there's a steady supply of blood available if we need it," said Army Col. Michael Fitzpatrick, director of the Armed Forces Blood Program Office.
SPORTS
July 17, 2000 | by Junji Noda, Daily News Sports Writer
Mark Karcher was back at McGonigle Hall yesterday. This time, though, it was much later in the day than those famed early-morning Temple practices, and John Chaney wasn't barking in his ear. Karcher returned wearing a Sixers jersey and scored almost every time he touched ball, duplicating shots he made hundreds of times from those same spots in his two seasons at Temple. "It felt like home," said Karcher, the Sixers' second-round draft pick. "When I was playing, it felt like I was back in my Temple days.
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