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Red Knot

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NEWS
March 10, 2008
The New Jersey Legislature needs to act immediately to save the red knot, a species of bird whose extinction appears imminent unless steps are taken now to protect its food supply. For many years, birders and other tourists have flocked to the Jersey shore to watch the red knot make its annual stop to dine on horseshoe crab eggs. The birds begin their migration in southernmost Chile, ending the journey 10,000 miles later in arctic Canada, where they mate before the snow season begins.
NEWS
June 3, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After more than a decade monitoring the steady decline of a small migratory shorebird called the red knot, researchers on Delaware Bay are finally hopeful. For the last several nights, the international crew of bird experts watched as flock after flock - sometimes hundreds of birds at once - lifted off and headed north, bound for their breeding grounds in the Arctic. "It was inspiring," said Larry Niles, the Department of Environmental Protection biologist who first drew attention to the bird's plight and who is now a consultant for the nonprofit Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey.
NEWS
October 11, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The tiny tracking device on the small shorebird's leg weighed about as much as two squares of toilet paper. But inside - all in extreme miniature - were a clock, a microprocessor, a memory, and a battery. And it gave scientists their first intimate view of a yearlong journey that had their jaws dropping. The bird, called a red knot, a mere handful of feathers weighing little more than a stick of butter, flew 16,600 miles round-trip, from the tip of South America to the Arctic and back - likely the longest migration on the planet, researchers said.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | Reviewed by Sandy Bauers
Moonbird A Year on the Wind with the Great Survivor B95 By Phillip Hoose Farrar Straus Giroux. 160 pp. $21.99   It was Feb. 20, 1995. The bird-banding team had caught so many birds that they ran out of the usual colored bands. Someone found black plastic in one of the trucks, and they fitted strips of it around the legs of the final birds, including one very special bird - a small shorebird that probably has become one of the most iconic birds known.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Red Knot, a shorebird which has undergone a drastic decline in recent years, will be listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act, according to the New Jersey Audubon. The action, which is expected to be announced next week, is a critical step toward the long-term protection and recovery of the species, said New Jersey Audubon, which has long addressed issues related to the Red Knot and other shorebirds. The listing would mean that the species meets the Endangered Species Act criteria of being likely to become in danger of extinction in the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.
NEWS
July 13, 2011
Finally, wildlife advocates say, a small shorebird is getting the attention it desperately needs. The Fish and Wildlife Service is moving to list the red knot as an endangered species, a process that likely will take until 2013, a spokesman for the agency said. The red knot has one of the longest migrations on the planet. Each spring, it stops for refueling at the Delaware Bay, where horseshoe crabs are just then coming ashore to lay their fat-rich eggs, a vital food for the bird.
NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The red knot has never lacked for friends - or in recent years, for mourners. Over the last decade, biologists, birders, and grade-schoolers have lamented the decline of the robin-size shorebird, which makes one of the longest migrations on the planet - from the tip of South America to its nesting grounds in the Arctic, stopping in spring to refuel on horseshoe crab eggs on Delaware Bay. Now, it is getting a federal lift as well. Recently, after years of appeals and petitions, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed listing the red knot as a threatened species.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rare shorebird that has defied all the odds was spotted yet again last week on Delaware Bay. He's a small thing - no bigger than a robin, weighing only as much as a stick of butter. But he has one of the longest migrations on the planet. And a lot of renown. Scientists refer to him as B95, after the number on his leg band. But his fans, which apparently are legion, call him the Moonbird because in his lifetime, researchers figure, he has flown the equivalent of the distance to the moon and at least halfway back.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The red knot, a small shorebird whose 10,000-mile migration brings it to Delaware Bay each spring, has been designated an endangered species in New Jersey, the state Department of Environmental Protection announced Thursday. Wildlife officials said that the new status, a change from threatened, did not add protections. However, it is formal recognition that despite years of efforts to help the bird, its numbers continue to decline. The red knot population on the bay is about 15,000, down from nearly 100,000 two decades ago. The change was one of several revisions and additions adopted by the DEP. Put on the endangered list were two other birds - the black rail and golden-winged warbler - as well as the gray petaltail, which is a species of dragonfly, and Indiana bat. Six dragonfly species and three birds - the American kestrel, cattle egret, and horned lark - were added to the state's threatened list.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ending months of input and speculation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday added to its list of threatened species a small shorebird called the red knot, whose round-trip migration of nearly 20,000 miles includes stops on Delaware Bay every spring to refuel on horseshoe crab eggs. The bird's dramatic decline has been blamed by many on aggressive harvesting of the crabs, which are used as bait in other fisheries. However, the red knot is the first bird whose listing identifies climate change as a principal threat to its survival, said Dan Ashe, director of the Fish and Wildlife Service.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A car door slammed on South Reeds Beach Road, and 300 feeding shorebirds - ruddy turnstones, sandpipers, and red knots - took wing, shrieking out over the Delaware Bay. The commotion caught the attention of Rutgers University biologist Joanna Burger. She rose from the nearby bulkhead where she was monitoring an experiment, and started walking over. All seemed calm on this Middle Township beach in Cape May County. And yet there is growing tension here between economics and ecology, conservationist and oyster farmer.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Somewhere in a remote part of Canada, antennae are likely picking up the signals of 100 shorebirds that just weeks ago were on the beaches of Delaware Bay, where they were caught with giant nets and fitted with tiny transmitters. The birds are robin-size creatures called red knots. After precipitous declines in their population on the bay - from about 100,000 birds in the 1990s to about 12,000 a few years ago - federal officials designated them as threatened in December. Researchers know that red knots have one of the longest migrations on the planet - from the tip of South America to their breeding grounds in the Arctic.
NEWS
May 4, 2015
The Narrow Edge A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab and an Epic Journey By Deborah Cramer Yale University Press. $28. 304 pp. Deborah Cramer's riveting story of a small shorebird begins with loss: loss of large numbers of birds, of beach and mudflat, of its food, "and a slide toward extinction. " Grim stuff. But in Cramer's able hands, the story of the red knot - a bird inextricably linked with the Delaware Bay and its horseshoe crabs - becomes a scientific page-turner, full of intricacies and astonishment.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fates of a migratory shorebird, horseshoe crabs, and the state's oyster industry have converged at the center of a debate over how each should be accommodated where they come together every spring, in New Jersey tidal flats along the Delaware Bay. Wildlife advocates hope to restore the dwindling population of red knots, small birds that federal authorities listed as a threatened species about three months ago. The bird's round-trip migration of...
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ending months of input and speculation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday added to its list of threatened species a small shorebird called the red knot, whose round-trip migration of nearly 20,000 miles includes stops on Delaware Bay every spring to refuel on horseshoe crab eggs. The bird's dramatic decline has been blamed by many on aggressive harvesting of the crabs, which are used as bait in other fisheries. However, the red knot is the first bird whose listing identifies climate change as a principal threat to its survival, said Dan Ashe, director of the Fish and Wildlife Service.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Red Knot, a shorebird which has undergone a drastic decline in recent years, will be listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act, according to the New Jersey Audubon. The action, which is expected to be announced next week, is a critical step toward the long-term protection and recovery of the species, said New Jersey Audubon, which has long addressed issues related to the Red Knot and other shorebirds. The listing would mean that the species meets the Endangered Species Act criteria of being likely to become in danger of extinction in the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.
NEWS
May 10, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MIDDLE TWP., N.J. - In time for the spawning season of the horseshoe crab and the subsequent spring migration of shorebirds like the ruddy turnstone and the red knot, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has completed a $1.65 million restoration project along five Cape May County bay beaches. It is the first of 31 such "coastal resilience" projects focusing on rebuilding natural areas after Hurricane Sandy, according to Eric Schrading, a field supervisor for the service's New Jersey field office.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bulldozers began spreading sand on several South Jersey beaches along the Delaware Bay on Wednesday, the first of 31 projects to restore wildlife habitat damaged by Hurricane Sandy up and down the East Coast. The just-started project, in Cape May County, is a $1.65 million race to replenish beaches before the May horseshoe crab spawn and shorebird migration. The New Jersey projects are also seen as a way to indirectly benefit residential bay communities, which many feel have not received a fair share of restoration money.
NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The red knot has never lacked for friends - or in recent years, for mourners. Over the last decade, biologists, birders, and grade-schoolers have lamented the decline of the robin-size shorebird, which makes one of the longest migrations on the planet - from the tip of South America to its nesting grounds in the Arctic, stopping in spring to refuel on horseshoe crab eggs on Delaware Bay. Now, it is getting a federal lift as well. Recently, after years of appeals and petitions, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed listing the red knot as a threatened species.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
It looks as if B95 - a shorebird that has attracted both popularity and paparazzi - is continuing his publicity tour of South Jersey. B95 is a red knot, and the name refers to the identifying letter and number on his leg band. But he also has the nickname Moonbird because, in his long life, researchers figure he has flown the equivalent distance to the moon and halfway back. A week ago, the famed bird was spotted on the Delaware side of Delaware Bay. On Friday, he was spotted on the Jersey side, at Cooks Beach.
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