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Red Light Cameras

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NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
ABINGTON The AAA Mid-Atlantic office, which covers the Philadelphia region, issued a news release this week that reads more like a hard-charging policy paper from a think tank than the traditional price-at-the-pump and road-hazards missives from the folks you call to tow your car. The fuel for the AAA's ire are red-light cameras in Pennsylvania - an issue set to expand beyond Philadelphia as Abington Township in Montgomery County gets ready to install...
NEWS
January 30, 2009 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
As City Council moves toward approving red-light cameras near City Hall, drivers have been raising questions and concerns. "What if I run a yellow light and the light turns red while I am in the intersection?" asked Steve Moritz, 50, a business analyst from Somerdale. And what happens if a funeral procession is snapped rolling past a red-light camera? "Are you still going to be responsible for those tickets?" asked Marlo Freeman, 38, of Mount Airy. Those questions arose after cameras at three intersections were activated this month.
NEWS
October 5, 2004
THE WAY is now paved for the city to be the first in Pennsylvania to install red-light cameras, which have the potential to save lives and reduce serious injuries. Right-angle intersection crashes, most often the result of red-light violations, are the largest cause of serious-injury crashes in urban areas. Cameras are a deterrent to red-light runners, and they provide 24-hour coverage. They don't call in sick, take vacations or get called away for another emergency. But cameras shouldn't replace police, who remain the greatest deterrent.
NEWS
February 16, 2009 | By Vincent J. Fenerty Jr
Philadelphia's red-light cameras have proved to be a big adjustment for drivers. Any project that affects so many people on a daily basis is bound to raise questions. But it's important to remember that the cameras are there to make Philadelphia's most dangerous intersections safer for drivers and pedestrians. The program isn't a rigid, inflexible burden for Philadelphia drivers. It's a thoughtful effort to make our city's streets safer to drive in and walk across. The cameras automatically photograph vehicles that run red lights, whereupon citations may be mailed to the vehicles' owners.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
Three more intersections in Northeast Philadelphia will get red-light cameras Friday, bringing to 24 the number of city intersections with the devices. The new lights will be activated Friday morning at Grant Avenue and Academy Road, Woodhaven and Knights Roads, and Bustleton Avenue and Byberry Road. After a 60-day grace period, during which drivers will get warning notices if they run a red light, motorists will be fined $100 if they are caught on camera running a red light. The grace period will end Dec. 18. - Paul Nussbaum
NEWS
August 11, 2004
Don't look for any smiling poses among the motorists captured on the traffic-enforcement version of Candid Camera coming soon to Philadelphia. Over the next few months, red-light cameras will be installed at several of the city's most dangerous intersections. The first lenses will be trained upon the often-deadly crossroads at Roosevelt Boulevard and Grant Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia. Little reason to smile about that, right? After all, getting your picture snapped while running a red light will bring a fine of $100.
NEWS
March 1, 2005
In a matter of days, hundreds of Philadelphia motorists have proved they're richly deserving of the city's crackdown on red-light running along Roosevelt Boulevard. That's how many drivers - hundreds, and counting - ignored the six red-light cameras set up at Grant Avenue and the boulevard. On the first day the cameras operated, drivers sped through the red at the rate of nearly 11 an hour. The second day, even more ran the light. So it looks like city officials picked the right spot to inaugurate the first of several red-light camera traps.
NEWS
January 1, 2011 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
It would have been hard to imagine, 20 years ago, that parts of Aramingo Avenue lined with industrial brownfields and vacant lots might ever be a thriving shopping district. But on Saturday, Philadelphia will officially recognize the avenue's commercial vitality by training the latest red-light cameras on its two busiest intersections. The cameras, which identify vehicles passing illegally through stoplights, will activate at 12:01 a.m. New Year's Day at Aramingo and York Street and two miles north at Aramingo and Castor Avenue.
NEWS
July 1, 2003 | By DON RUSSELL russeld@phillynews.com Daily News staff writer Bob Warner contributed to this report
AN OBSCURE legislative provision engineered by House Speaker John Perzel gives one of his campaign contributors a leg up on running the city's lucrative red-light traffic camera system. The company, Affiliated Computer Services of Dallas, already receives $8 million a year for data processing services at the Perzel-controlled Philadelphia Parking Authority. Now, the politically active firm stands to boost those revenues substantially, thanks to six words inserted in the state law that legalized the traffic surveillance cameras in Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum and Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writers
Some drivers caught by red-light cameras in Cherry Hill, Stratford, and three other municipalities will get small refunds from the cameras' operator under a tentative $2.1 million settlement announced Wednesday. The money, to be paid by Redflex Traffic Systems of Phoenix, will be divided among about 260,000 drivers and their lawyers. Individual drivers involved in the class-action lawsuit can expect refunds of $8.50 or $14, depending on the amount of their citations. That equals 10 percent of the fines; individual tickets were $85 or $140.
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NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
Nearly $5.5 million collected from fines for red-light violations at 28 Philadelphia intersections will fund 23 safety-improvement projects in 18 municipalities across the state, Gov. Wolf announced Monday. The biggest chunk of money - $2.8 million - will go to five projects in Philadelphia, including $1 million for safety improvements at 30 to 50 "crash locations," according to a news release. Michael Carroll, acting commissioner of the Philadelphia Streets Department, said the city would have three years in which to identify the sites and use the Automated Red Light Enforcement grant.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Sarah Stuart
IN 2013, Feltonville resident Samara Banks and three of her children were killed by a driver racing another motorist, traffic light to traffic light on Roosevelt Boulevard. Why would anyone blatantly speed on a road posted at 45 mph? Because racing on an overly wide Roosevelt Boulevard is easy and has too few consequences. The only consequence that night was four innocents losing their lives. But, sadly, they weren't the only ones. In Philadelphia, speed-related crashes kill nearly 100 people a year.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
A few years back, right around Christmas, I got a surprise in the mail that was anything but a gift: a speeding ticket from a town right outside Washington in Montgomery County, Md. My crime: going 38 m.p.h. in a 30 m.p.h. zone. A couple years later, another family Thanksgiving in Washington yielded a similar December surprise: a ticket for running a red light, with the proof once again right there in the envelope. Yup, that was a grainy shot of our minivan midway through a Wisconsin Avenue intersection, the signal plainly on red. Both incidents came to mind this week, a week after New Jersey allowed its five-year experiment with red-light cameras to lapse and days after a Chicago Tribune study cast new doubts on the efficacy of the Windy City's extensive system, which posts electronic eyes at more than 350 intersections.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
After five years, New Jersey's pilot red-light camera traffic program came to a quiet end. But the debate continues on whether the controversial experiment improved safety or was just a cash cow for municipalities that raked in millions from frustrated motorists. Six municipalities in Camden and Gloucester Counties installed cameras at nine intersections in South Jersey under the program, which began in 2009. The cameras nailed hundreds of thousands of motorists blowing through intersections when the light was red. At $85 each, the citations pulled in millions of dollars in fines for more than two dozen municipalities, which were allowed to keep the bulk of the money to add to their coffers.
NEWS
November 25, 2014
ISSUE | EDUCATION Impressive resumé As a parent and a retired teacher, I felt student Natalie Hackett Abulhawa's frustration in applying to college and in the inequity of the system ("Daunting start to college application process," Nov. 20). I agree with every point she made. My hope is that she can use her opinion piece as her essay during her college application process. |Vivian Wolfson, West Chester, gwily7@verizon.net Wolf at chalkboard When Ed Rendell served as governor, I was chair of the state House Education Committee, drafting the legislation that provided for smaller class sizes across the state, all-day kindergarten, funding for quality preschool programs, and other education initiatives that Rendell embraced, signed into law, and included in his budgets ("Corbett campaign lied about Rendell's record," Nov. 14)
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's controversial red-light cameras are likely to go dark next month, as the five-year experimental program expires with no legislative push to renew it. Supporters of the cameras say the program has improved safety, while opponents contend the cameras have served only to enrich local and state governments. The program was scheduled to expire Dec. 16, unless the Legislature renews it. No such legislation has been introduced. There are 76 camera-equipped intersections in 25 New Jersey towns, including in the South Jersey communities of Cherry Hill, Gloucester Township, Stratford, Glassboro, Deptford, and Monroe Township.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Rick Short is convinced that red-light cameras are little more than "right-turn-on-red cash cows" for New Jersey municipalities. The self-employed father of four is so sure the devices don't make intersections safer - as proponents insist - he's challenged Cherry Hill officials to "prove me wrong. " And if they can do that, the township resident promises to "stand in the rain or snow for five hours at Route 70 and Springdale Road with a sign" acknowledging the mistake. I interview Short, 47, at a Cherry Hill Starbucks, where he arrives with charts, spreadsheets, and talking points.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A computer malfunction has saved about 17,000 motorists, including hundreds in four South Jersey towns, from getting $85 tickets for running red lights. The company that operates red-light cameras for 17 New Jersey towns, American Traffic Solutions Inc. of Tempe, Ariz., has notified the state that a computer glitch occurred between May 28 and June 30 and resulted in motorists not receiving notices of violations that had occurred earlier this year. Under state law, if a ticket is not served within 90 days, it must be dismissed.
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