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Red Meat

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The Philadelphia streetscape has tilted toward the corner of 17th and John F. Kennedy Boulevard in the last few months. And it's not just the weight of the glass-and-steel skyscraper Comcast built there that did the trick. It's the gravity of hunger it triggered that has electrified this once-dead zone on the Center City grid. The lunchtime masses now pour into the tower's sleek new underground food court for paninis, sushi, and $1 espresso shots with their mini-cannolis. Thousands of Comcast employees and their privileged guests, meanwhile, dine in the clouds at Ralph's Cafe, the rarefied 42d-floor cafeteria where sesame-seared tuna steaks come with a soaring view over the city's tallest spires.
FOOD
December 19, 2014 | By Joelle Farrell, For The Inquirer
The holiday season is a time when I want to impress friends and family with a special meal, but I don't want to miss all the fun and socializing and arrive at the table sweaty and exhausted. Since I want the meal to register a notch above a typical supper, I've learned it's best to plan a menu that can be prepared largely ahead of time, with a few quick trips to the kitchen during cocktail hour. Rich, indulgent ingredients like red meat, red wine, cream, and chocolate can make the simplest dishes taste extraordinary, and they're the perfect way to savor a celebratory meal during a cold, dark winter evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1995 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The ranks of vegetarians are growing. All you have to do is pick up a newspaper or magazine and read all about it. Or flick on the television. And we're all becoming more health-conscious when it comes to eating. You can read about that, too. So why are steak houses popping up like corks at a champagne gala? Easy question. Red meat is hot. Or so goes the slogan at the Palm Restaurant at the Bellevue. So hot, the restaurant, in conjunction with Temple University Center City, will be gourmandizing on the subject of red meat at a night course this spring semester.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2009 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Red meat, booze, and sports are not exclusively manly domains. But let's face it: A serious Guys' Night Out usually lands somewhere in the vicinity of those key ingredients. Here's my list of in-the-know spots to sate the craving for one or all of the above: OLD GUARD HOUSE INN (THREE BELLS) 953 Youngsford Rd., Gladwyne 610-649-9708; www.guardhouseinn.com The varnished-log dining rooms festooned with antlers, muskets, and pewter mugs give this Main Line institution the Ye-Olde-School manly look, as the volunteer firefighters hanging at the clubby bar can attest.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1992 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Concern about fat and cholesterol may be leading health-conscious Americans away from red meat, but beef, pork and lamb from the United States are more popular than ever overseas. U.S. red-meat exports have nearly tripled in the last 10 years, from 527 million pounds in 1981 to 1.47 billion last year, according to the U.S. Agriculture Department. And the U.S. Meat Export Federation, meeting in Philadelphia yesterday, today and tomorrow, is exploring ways to fatten that calf. Targets include Japan, which is by far the biggest importer of U.S. red meat, plus the Commonwealth of Independent States, especially the Russian Federation, and the European Community, which has proved to be a pesky trading partner.
FOOD
June 5, 1988 | The Inquirer staff
A recent Agriculture Department report says there have been dramatic changes in the mix of foods consumed by Americans since 1970, but some inconsistencies, too. Of all the meat consumed in 1986, two-thirds was red meat, mostly beef, pork and lamb, compared with three-fourths in the early 1970s. "Instead, we ate more poultry, fish, grains and cereal products," the report said. "We also cut back on whole milk, while consuming more low-fat milk and yogurt. Fresh fruit and vegetable consumption rose as well.
FOOD
May 29, 1996 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Behold the ostrich. Taller than an NBA center, faster than a greyhound, leggier than a showgirl, leaner than a chicken. Leaner than a chicken? Yes, and lower in calories. Ostrich - there's no euphemism like "veal" or "venison" - has been popping up on the lists of specials at local restaurants, despite the price, which can be as high as $30 a pound. (That translates to over $25 as an entree.) "I was a little bit leery at first," said Louis Imbesi, chef at Catelli Ristorante in the Main Street Plaza in Voorhees.
SPORTS
May 19, 2011
To find out more about how Bernard Hopkins is still fit enough to fight at age 46, the Daily News sent fitness columnist Kimberly Garrison to get the details on his diet and exercise routine. WHEN I WAS asked to interview Bernard Hopkins, I admit, I went in with my preconceived ideas and stereotypes about boxers. You know the stereotypes, boxers are "uneducated with poor character. " Well, I was dead wrong. The 46-year-old Hopkins, who's up for possibly his biggest fight ever on Saturday in Montreal for the WBC light-heavyweight championship against Jean Pascal, is part professor, preacher and philosopher.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | Paula Moore
As if we needed another reason to eat our veggies, here's one: According to a new Harvard School of Public Health study, eating red meat increases your risk of early death. OK, here's one more: Dr. Margaret Chan, the director general of the World Health Organization, recently warned that antibiotic resistance could bring about "the end of modern medicine as we know it. " In other words, if the hamburgers don't kill you, the superbugs spawned on factory farms will. Analyzing nearly 30 years of data collected from 121,000 participants, the Harvard researchers found that people who eat red meat regularly are significantly more likely to die prematurely from various causes, including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.
FOOD
April 5, 1989 | The Inquirer staff
Faced with the problem of what to cook when the Queen of Italy assigned him to feed everyone at the palace, Raffaele Esposito of Naples came up with a now-legendary recipe for pizza in the colors of the Italian flag. His Pizza Margherita - topped with red tomato, green basil and white mozzarella cheese and named after his royal patron - is the hallmark of Naples around the world. That happened 100 years ago this week. To mark the anniversary, the city's Association for Real Pizza has teamed up with local politicians to lobby for a law that would protect Esposito's method.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | Philly Clout
DEMOCRATIC mayoral nominee Jim Kenney , who steamrollered state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams in Tuesday's Democratic primary, skipped the traditional postelection lunch at the Palm to attend a Broad Street Ministry luncheon with Republican mayoral candidate Melissa Murray Bailey and Gov. Wolf . The Clout team - big believers in tradition - decided to post up at the bar at the Palm with N.Y. strip steaks and Old Fashioneds, knowing full...
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the start of the life-or-death competition in the Hunger Games series, the contestants are presented with a cornucopia teeming with tools for their survival. The protagonist, Katniss Everdeen, is warned to steer clear. As much as she needs the resources, charging into the stockpile will put her in the throes of a savage competition for dominance. Those seeking the keys to a healthy diet these days face a similar predicament. Decades of studies have produced vast stores of data about the foods and nutrients likely to enhance and extend life.
FOOD
December 19, 2014 | By Joelle Farrell, For The Inquirer
The holiday season is a time when I want to impress friends and family with a special meal, but I don't want to miss all the fun and socializing and arrive at the table sweaty and exhausted. Since I want the meal to register a notch above a typical supper, I've learned it's best to plan a menu that can be prepared largely ahead of time, with a few quick trips to the kitchen during cocktail hour. Rich, indulgent ingredients like red meat, red wine, cream, and chocolate can make the simplest dishes taste extraordinary, and they're the perfect way to savor a celebratory meal during a cold, dark winter evening.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
JEB BUSH made some very provocative comments about immigration the other day. They were red meat for a conservative base that thinks in broad brushstrokes about foreigners. Actually, they were more like a bullfighter's red cape, or scarlet blood in the water. Commenting on the wave of illegal bodies present in our country, this brother of one compassionate conservative president and son of another observed: "The way I look at this is someone who comes to our country because they couldn't come legally, they come to our country because their families - the dad who loved their children - was worried that their children didn't have food on the table.
FOOD
November 1, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
And for the next big act debuting soon on the Avenue of the Arts: Dinner in 16 one-bite acts? "The stage is set for Iron Chef Jose Garces," touts a blue banner draped across the Spruce Street flank of the Kimmel Center, where the marquee restaurant called Volvér is under construction for an opening by the end of the year. That the Kimmel Center is trying again to house a serious restaurant is only part of the story. The first attempt 11 years ago failed miserably with Cadence - the second-floor venue doomed by high prices, inconsistent cooking, and even more sporadic hours.
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | By David Goldstein, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Imagine the Department of Education pushing an idea called "Teacherless Tuesday," or the Department of Homeland Security suggesting "Fenceless Friday. " The Department of Agriculture, promoter of all things edible, had a plan this week in an in-house newsletter to promote "Meatless Mondays" in the vast bureaucracy's employee cafeterias. Meatless Monday is a global campaign backed by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and others to reduce the possible health risks of eating too much meat.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald and INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " My daughter says she has not completely abandoned the blog, but she has certainly not been cooking, taking a few weeks before she starts medical school to visit friends, go to the beach, and do a lot of nothing. So, I've implored my son to take a crack at this cooking thing. Sally had a preference for learning a lot of vegetarian dishes, or meals centered on fish or chicken. While Tim's favorite meals are more meat-centric, everyone in the family loves crabcakes, so I thought that would be a recipe he was eager to learn.
NEWS
May 30, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Asked about the latest study from the public health experts at Harvard who say eating red meat regularly probably trims a half-dozen years off your life expectancy, Stephen Verica sniffs dismissively. "Basically," he says, "whoever has the research grant has to earn his money. " Verica, owner of Kissin Fresh Meats, is an unapologetic, unabashed, unreformed carnivore. "I eat beef or veal and pasta seven days a week," he says. "It's the way I was raised. " Let the experts carp about the dangers of heme iron intake and the increased risk of diabetes, heart attacks, and cancer.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | Paula Moore
As if we needed another reason to eat our veggies, here's one: According to a new Harvard School of Public Health study, eating red meat increases your risk of early death. OK, here's one more: Dr. Margaret Chan, the director general of the World Health Organization, recently warned that antibiotic resistance could bring about "the end of modern medicine as we know it. " In other words, if the hamburgers don't kill you, the superbugs spawned on factory farms will. Analyzing nearly 30 years of data collected from 121,000 participants, the Harvard researchers found that people who eat red meat regularly are significantly more likely to die prematurely from various causes, including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.
NEWS
March 19, 2012
The more red meat you eat, the greater your disease risk Eating red meat is associated with a sharply increased risk of death from cancer and heart disease, according to a new study, and the more of it you eat, the greater the risk. The analysis, published online in Archives of Internal Medicine, used data from two studies that involved 121,342 men and women who filled out questionnaires about health and diet from 1980 through 2006. People who ate more red meat were less physically active and more likely to smoke and had a higher body mass index, researchers found.
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