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Red October

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NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Charles Pukanecz, Special to The Inquirer
He has gone from insurance salesman to intelligence consultant, and the freedom that allowed him to do that is at the root of his philosophy. Tom Clancy, author of The Hunt for Red October and other Cold War novels, says that the world over, people are turning to democracy because it's "the way God wanted us to live. " Speaking to more than 1,000 people at Delaware Valley College in Doylestown Township on Friday, Clancy touched on an array of international issues and the rapidly changing state of the world.
NEWS
November 27, 1993 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Chuck Gagnon leaned into the rhythmic clacking sound as it flowed from a wall-mounted loudspeaker at the Naval Research Laboratory here. "That's a propeller," he pronounced. "Five-bladed, in fact. " A computer screen continued to flash a series of blotchy graphs visually depicting other sounds emanating from the speakers. Gagnon reeled off their creators: submarine, humpback whale, earthquake, finback whale, another sub. For a moment, the Cold War seemed hot again. For 23 years, Navy Lt. George J. "Chuck" Gagnon has been hunting Red Octobers - submarines from the Soviet Union and its successor states that might pose a threat to U.S. shores.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are only seven genuine movie stars in the world today, and Sean Connery is one of them. - Steven Spielberg Marko Ramius is a hard, deep and quiet submarine captain who holds his crew together in calamitous situations by the force of his personality. Just the right part for Sean Connery, a poor kid from the slums of Edinburgh who has grown into a 60-year-old actor who can steal a scene with a glance, a barely discernible lift of an eyebrow. He is also an actor who stamps his personality on a film and approaches his roles with very definite ideas about how they should be played, ideas that often mean considerable rewriting of scripts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1989 | By Jeff Seiken, Special to The Inquirer
His books have rocketed to the head of the best-seller lists with the speed and precision of the ultra-sophisticated weaponry they exalt. He has crafted a new literary form, the "techno-thriller," a genre in which the main characters share top billing with the high-tech hardware they wield. Technology is the lifeblood of the four novels to date by insurance-agent- turned-superstar-author Tom Clancy. So it's only fitting to report that spinoffs of his first two books have now appeared courtesy of that paradigm of modern technology, the personal computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Hunt for Red October" is a happy cinematic event, the first motion picture that allows us to experience the sweaty-palm thrills of the Cold War without worrying that the world will blow up this year. The movie is an entertaining journey back to the days of mutually assured destruction, nuclear winters and scowling Soviet dictators who always died of colds. Now, with bits of the pulverized Berlin Wall in the hands of greedy entrepreneurs and Big Mac wrappers blowing around Red Square, everybody is concentrating on more important things, like getting their cut of the peace dividend.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In assuming command of the nuclear submarine thriller The Hunt for Red October, the highly talented John McTiernan took arms against a sea of trouble in more ways than he could have anticipated. Beyond the staggering logistics of filming ships, jet fighters, helicopters and submarines in action above and below the waves, there were other nagging questions. How can a tautly paced high-tech film accommodate the higher-tech jargon and machinery and the convoluted plotting of Tom Clancy's novel so that the audience can readily grasp it?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic Staff writer Steven Rea, Variety and the Hollywood Reporter contributed to this report
Even though its renegade Soviet sub was released into the warmer waters of the thawing Cold War, there were enough thrills left in John McTiernan's The Hunt for Red October to bring in $120 million at the box office. The movie's success has led Paramount to buy two more Tom Clancy novels and to sign Alec Baldwin to star in them as wily intelligence operative Jack Ryan. Baldwin, who played Ryan in Red October, will return in the film versions of Clear and Present Danger and Patriot Games.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Tom Clancy is the reigning king of the War Toys R Us school of high-tech fiction, and The Hunt for Red October yielded a gripping thriller two years ago. With his Patriot Games, fugitive submarines give way to a movie that simply skims the surface. Red October went into release as the Cold War entered a dramatic thaw. And despite the fact that it was the first movie in history to be perestricken by political upheaval, it survived and prospered. Patriot Games has a topical Dan Quayle-friendly family-values motif, and less hardware than the first Clancy film.
NEWS
October 1, 2010 | By BROAD STREET BILLY as told to DAN GERINGER, phillies@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
RED OCTOBER! Our time to howl! So keep sending your Phillies stories and photos to GOT HEART: On Sept. 7, Juan Lopez of Burlington Township, N.J., did what he's done for 18 years - took 400 fans from his community to the Phillies game. He and his son Nicholas, 12, sat with the special-needs members of their group to make sure they were comfortable. When Raul Ibanez hit a triple, the Phils' third-base coach, Sam Perlozzo, handed Nicholas the ball. Later, the Marlins' Hanley Ramirez threw Nicholas another one. An older fan sitting nearby told Nicholas that he had come to games for 30 years but never got a ball.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The giant conning tower of the Soviet nuclear submarine Red October looms over frigid gray waters near its home base. Its commander, who plans to defect to the West with all the state-of-the-art technology on board, turns to his first officer and co-conspirator. "It's time," announces Capt. Marko Ramius, and The Hunt for Red October is on. In any other year of the last four decades - when the Cold War gripped the world and superpower relations were icier than the waves lapping at the Red October's massive bow - the time would indeed have been right.
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SPORTS
October 6, 2010 | By KERITH GABRIEL, gabrielk@phillynews.com
Phillies fans are psyched to be a part of yet another rendition of Red October, but when it comes to hunting for tickets, it's Reds fans who have them beat. Just slightly. Ticket prices in Philadelphia for today's Game 1 at Citizens Bank Park held an average of $202 as of late yesterday, according to online ticket website StubHub. Prices ranged from $69 for seats in the Terrace Deck (400s) and as much as $900 for select seats in the Diamond Club, StubHub said. Roughly 2,700 tickets were available for sale on StubHub as of last night for Game 1. About 2,000 tickets were available for Friday's Game 2. However, Cincinnati fans, feeling the frenzy of the Reds' first postseason appearance since 1995, are willing to shell out just a bit more for Game 3 at Great American Ball Park.
SPORTS
October 4, 2010 | By DAVID MURPHY, dmurphy@phillynews.com
ATLANTA - Sitting in the visitors' dugout at Turner Field, Scott Proefrock gazed across the sun-soaked field and focused his eyes high above the leftfield wall. With a nod of the head, he pointed to the 16 pennants plastered above the lower seating bowl, each of them bearing the year of a Braves division title. "The most difficult thing in sports is not to get good," the Phillies assistant general manager said. "It's to stay good. " At four in a row, the Phillies have a long way to go before they can equal the Braves' run of 14 consecutive division titles (1991-2005)
NEWS
October 1, 2010 | By BROAD STREET BILLY as told to DAN GERINGER, phillies@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
RED OCTOBER! Our time to howl! So keep sending your Phillies stories and photos to GOT HEART: On Sept. 7, Juan Lopez of Burlington Township, N.J., did what he's done for 18 years - took 400 fans from his community to the Phillies game. He and his son Nicholas, 12, sat with the special-needs members of their group to make sure they were comfortable. When Raul Ibanez hit a triple, the Phils' third-base coach, Sam Perlozzo, handed Nicholas the ball. Later, the Marlins' Hanley Ramirez threw Nicholas another one. An older fan sitting nearby told Nicholas that he had come to games for 30 years but never got a ball.
SPORTS
March 29, 2009 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last time a National League team repeated as World Series champion, Gerald Ford was in the White House, cookie-cutter multipurpose stadiums were still really cool, and a blackberry was something you popped into your mouth after rinsing with cool water. The Cincinnati Reds, with future Hall of Famers on the field and in the dugout, ruled baseball in 1975 and 1976. On a short list of the greatest teams ever, they carried a moniker that even today resonates with greatness. The Big Red Machine.
SPORTS
October 17, 2008
MY BOSS asked me to take a 28-year walk through Phillies World Series history - one is the loneliest number - and pick a Legends of the Fall Classic All-Star team. My apologies to centenarians who might remember the 1915 Grover Cleveland Alexander Phils. And to Greatest Generation members who count the 1950 Whiz Kids as special as 25 cents-a-gallon gas. But there are simply too many calendar pages between the Phillies of Rich Ashburn and Robin Roberts and the lonely 1980 title.
NEWS
October 8, 2008 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phillies have heard a little something about a championship drought in Philadelphia. It is something like 25 years or 250. It is just 25 - not too long considering the Earth is between several thousand and 4.5 billion years old, depending on whom you ask - though it certainly feels longer. But the Phillies, who will open the National League Championship Series tomorrow night against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Citizens Bank Park, don't feel the pressure to end the drought.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The good news about "The 13th Warrior" is that, sometimes, it looks like "Braveheart. " The bad news is that, sometimes, it looks like "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," and is often just as funny, although it doesn't mean to be. "Warrior" stars Antonio Banderas as Ahmed, a learned Arab poet banned from Arabia (he was an adulterer) and sent as punishment to Europe, where men live primitively. The refined Ahmed is appalled by the "northmen" he encounters, and in its early moments, "The 13th Warrior" is an interesting twist on the usual message about tolerance: white people discovering that "heathen" cultures really aren't so barbaric.
SPORTS
March 20, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Novelist Tom Clancy practically scoffed when a rival bidder threatened his purchase of the Minnesota Vikings. The NFL justified Clancy's confidence yesterday, upholding his right to buy the team. NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue rejected a claim by Vikings president Roger Headrick that he had the right to match Clancy's offer of slightly more than $200 million. Clancy's purchase still must be approved by 23 of the 30 NFL owners. The matter is not likely to be discussed during next week's owners meetings at Orlando, Fla. The next owners meeting is May 19 and 20 at Miami.
SPORTS
February 4, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
In one of his novels, Tom Clancy got the Minnesota Vikings to the Super Bowl and then destroyed them with a nuclear weapon. The best-selling author hopes to write a different ending to the Vikings' next Super Bowl trip now that the current owners have accepted his bid to buy the team. Clancy's NFL-record offer of slightly more than $200 million all but ended one of the league's most unusual ownership structures and allowed Clancy to fulfill a long-held ambition of buying an NFL team.
SPORTS
February 4, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES Inquirer staff writer Tim Panaccio contributed to this article
If the NFL approves, novelist Tom Clancy, already a minority owner of baseball's Baltimore Orioles, will become the new lead owner of football's Minnesota Vikings. "I just got a call that my bid has been accepted and I have bought the Minnesota Vikings," Clancy said yesterday from his home in Baltimore. Clancy, 50, the author of such military thrillers as The Hunt for Red October, Patriot Games, and Clear and Present Danger, said he intended to keep the team in Minnesota. He has an undisclosed number of limited partners and would not say how much they had bid. The St. Paul Pioneer Press reported that the bid was $206 million, a National Football League record.
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