CollectionsRed Sea
IN THE NEWS

Red Sea

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
June 8, 1997 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob Woods was a lonely man. There he stood last night, all by himself, in front of Joe Louis Arena, wearing his Flyers hat in a sea of red and white. "I'm not worried," Woods, 36, said bravely. "Hey, they're only Red Wings fans. " Despite the bravado, Woods was worried. First, he had no ticket to last night's Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals. Woods is friends with Flyers center Joel Otto - both were in Woods' sister's wedding party and the groom was a teammate of Otto's at Bemidji State years ago - but Otto had to give his extra tickets to his family.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  Back in ancient times, say, 1956, when Charlton Heston led the Israelites on their epic march out of Egypt in Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments , miracles like the parting of the Red Sea were, indeed, miraculous. Matte paintings, rear projection, a gigantic U-shaped water tank, hundreds of costumed extras leaning into wind machines, all that livestock, the duck that waddles out of the frame - the coordination of actors, animals, machinery, props, hair stylists, dolly grips, truly astounding!
NEWS
February 28, 2008
The passing of William F. Buckley Jr., 82, yesterday leaves the world of ideas a little less gracious, not as much fun, and woefully lacking in vocabulary skills. Buckley went from being almost a lone conservative voice in the post-World War II liberal wilderness, to the intellectual heart and soul of a movement that brought to power Reagan, Gingrich and Bush. Though there was one run for mayor of New York City in 1965, his influence came mostly from outside the political arena.
NEWS
September 9, 2009
IT'S 3 A.M. And in middle-class Wynnefield, it's the eve of the first day of classes for St. Joseph's University. I'm a Penn grad and work in student life. I love college students and support their goals. My alma mater was more than responsible for the gentrification of West Philadelphia. It campaigned until we had "University City. " I'm sure that in some manner, the process went much like the change in Wynnefield is going. I'm sure the residents struggled with the sights and sounds of college gentrification.
NEWS
September 17, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 5,000 Bell Atlantic union employees demanding a new contract rallied at JFK Plaza yesterday, and the theme was red - shirts, caps, balloons and occasionally the language. The turnout had the trappings of a picnic - with bagged lunches, recorded music, and soft drinks and sandwiches for out-of-towners who came by bus from New York, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and Georgia. They joined workers from Pennsylvania to show support for the Communications Workers of America, AFL-CIO District 13. The union represents 37,000 Bell Atlantic workers in New Jersey, West Virginia, Virginia, Washington, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland who have been working without a contract since Aug. 5. Bell Atlantic, as well as the union, said bargaining had been stalled over wages, job security and payment for health care by retirees.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1987 | By DIANE WHITE, Special to the Daily News
I have been flipping through "The Book of Questions" (Workman, $3.95) and asking myself a question not in the book: Why am I doing this? One reason is that so many other people seem to be doing it, and I'm basically a sheep. Another reason is that I tend to find this sort of foolishness irresistible. For example, consider question 27, one of my favorites: "If God appeared to you in a series of vivid and moving dreams and told you to leave everything behind, travel alone to the Red Sea and become a fisherman, what would you do?"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1996 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Move over, Charlton Heston: You are still the most famous Moses of all time, but Ben Kingsley is amply qualified to stand on the same pedestal with you. Before you roll the Red Sea over me, Mr. Heston, I hasten to add that you are still the definition of this towering role. But after you see Kingsley's interpretation of the lawgiver, I'm sure you'll like it as much as many television viewers will. Moses, a four-hour mini-series, will be shown in two parts on the TNT cable channel, at 8 p.m. Sunday and Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's always thrilling hearing voices belt out victory over oppression. Although I'm glad the Mendelssohn Club's exuberant performance of Israel in Egypt Saturday night wasn't sung for the Middle East peace talks. The Biblical texts German George Frideric Handel set for his English masterpiece sure are revenge-thirsty. Blasts and blains and overtaking enemies are the order of this oratorio, whose grand double choruses celebrate the sinking of the Egyptians in the Red Sea. The sonic results of the season-opener at the Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion may not affect Middle East harmony, but they left no doubt music director Alan Harler is to be commended.
NEWS
May 17, 1993 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Independence Mall, a biblical Moses - all of 15 years old - raised his staff and parted the Red Sea, and 70 grade-school children from Congregation Beth Or scampered to safety. At Penn's Landing, there was bacalhau for lunch, a dish made from dried cod that is to Portugal what hamburgers are to America . . . only it's healthier. And finally, there was this 25-foot greased pole at Ninth and Montrose Streets in South Philly. Hanging from the top were 10 bags filled with meats and cheeses.
SPORTS
June 11, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
A red sea of hockey worshipers parted yesterday for the Detroit Red Wings, who paraded through some 1 million fans as the silver Stanley Cup that eluded the franchise for 42 years sparkled under cloudless skies. "For all Red Wings fans, this is your day in the sun," coach Scotty Bowman told the screaming throngs at a Hart Plaza rally that followed the two-hour parade down Woodward Avenue. The players and coaches rode in red convertibles, feted for their sweep of the Flyers on Saturday night that ended an NHL championship drought dating to 1955.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  Back in ancient times, say, 1956, when Charlton Heston led the Israelites on their epic march out of Egypt in Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments , miracles like the parting of the Red Sea were, indeed, miraculous. Matte paintings, rear projection, a gigantic U-shaped water tank, hundreds of costumed extras leaning into wind machines, all that livestock, the duck that waddles out of the frame - the coordination of actors, animals, machinery, props, hair stylists, dolly grips, truly astounding!
SPORTS
September 15, 2011
'WITH AGE," Michael Vick was saying yesterday, "comes the maturation process. And everything happens in time. " He was talking about the job here, not the odyssey that took him from Atlanta icon to national lightning rod. He was talking about reading blitzes and choosing chances more judiciously, and well, about energy drinks. "I tell you what, I won't take any more of those before the game," he said. Made him jittery early in last week's game. Made it harder to focus, made him braver than he needed to be. Made him too much like the guy who quarterbacked the Falcons from 2001 to 2006, a guy who could win and lose a game with his rashness and unpredictability, a guy so jittery he made everyone around him jittery, too. Michael Vick has already returned to Atlanta as part of the Eagles, back in 2009, running for one touchdown, passing for another as the "Wildcat" complement to starting quarterback Donovan McNabb.
NEWS
September 30, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ann Kaufmann, of Andorra, an expert court reporter and accomplished scuba diver, died at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania after a two-week battle with lung cancer Saturday, Sept. 25, three days after her 54th birthday. Ms. Kaufmann transcribed complicated civil litigation depositions including for product-liability, medical-malpractice, and patent-infringement cases, and litigation involving water-pollution issues, her husband, Robert Dunham, a lawyer, said. In the 1990s, she traveled several times to Liberia to transcribe depositions for legal proceedings involving the destruction of rubber trees at Bridgestone-Firestone plantations during civil unrest.
NEWS
October 27, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Behold Bruce Feiler's optimism. You and your relatives, he says with conviction, can talk about religion and politics at Thanksgiving and survive. The best-selling author of several books connecting the biblical past to the present, Feiler says he understands it's a risky proposition. But he rejects the conventional wisdom that if you want to get to the pumpkin pie without inciting World War III, keep your opinions about health care, gay rights, abortion, nuclear energy, the bailout, the White House, and Fox News to yourself.
NEWS
September 9, 2009
IT'S 3 A.M. And in middle-class Wynnefield, it's the eve of the first day of classes for St. Joseph's University. I'm a Penn grad and work in student life. I love college students and support their goals. My alma mater was more than responsible for the gentrification of West Philadelphia. It campaigned until we had "University City. " I'm sure that in some manner, the process went much like the change in Wynnefield is going. I'm sure the residents struggled with the sights and sounds of college gentrification.
NEWS
February 28, 2008
The passing of William F. Buckley Jr., 82, yesterday leaves the world of ideas a little less gracious, not as much fun, and woefully lacking in vocabulary skills. Buckley went from being almost a lone conservative voice in the post-World War II liberal wilderness, to the intellectual heart and soul of a movement that brought to power Reagan, Gingrich and Bush. Though there was one run for mayor of New York City in 1965, his influence came mostly from outside the political arena.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
LEAVING A hole in the hearts of fiction writers everywhere, there are only a few issues of Weekly World News left before it bites the dust. This being the Weekly World News, the dust comprises a radioactive space particle left by aliens when they came for Elvis. Or romanced Hillary Clinton. Aliens are busy - and horny. American Media, which owns WWN along with the National Enquirer and the Star, has announced the black & white tabloid will cease publication Aug. 27 and go Internet only (weeklyworld news.
NEWS
February 4, 2004
Vice President Cheney is quoted in a recent book as saying budget deficits don't matter. In that case, the Bush administration's new budget for the federal government sets a record for not mattering. The White House says the budget deficit for this year will be $521 billion, a record. For fiscal year 2005, which begins Oct. 1, the deficit is projected to be "only" $364 billion. But this story line hardly matters, because this budget document is a fantasy worthy of J.R.R. Tolkien or J.K. Rowling.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Prince of Egypt" is bound to draw comparisons to the 1956 epic "The Ten Commandments," if for no other reason than it's been decades since anyone attempted a reverent version of a biblical story. Cecil B. DeMille's picture was the beginning of the end of "Behold the power of God" cinema, a genre that was all but dead by the 1960s, when sweeping cultural changes altered America - and Hollywood with it. Watching "The Prince of Egypt," we are reminded why Hollywood no longer makes movies about the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, even though the rights have lapsed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's always thrilling hearing voices belt out victory over oppression. Although I'm glad the Mendelssohn Club's exuberant performance of Israel in Egypt Saturday night wasn't sung for the Middle East peace talks. The Biblical texts German George Frideric Handel set for his English masterpiece sure are revenge-thirsty. Blasts and blains and overtaking enemies are the order of this oratorio, whose grand double choruses celebrate the sinking of the Egyptians in the Red Sea. The sonic results of the season-opener at the Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion may not affect Middle East harmony, but they left no doubt music director Alan Harler is to be commended.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|