CollectionsRed Tails
IN THE NEWS

Red Tails

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Cuba Gooding Jr. is one of the veteran Tuskegee Airmen. That is, the actor plays a base commander in the new, George Lucas -produced Red Tails, an action-packed account of the daring aerial exploits of the famed all-black flying unit of World War II. And Gooding was one of the young African American aces who took to the skies to shoot down Nazis in 1995's HBO drama The Tuskegee Airmen . Both films show...
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
George Lucas, the legendary director of the Star Wars saga, should have taken a few down-to-earth meetings with master storyteller Bertram Levy before he made Red Tails , the story of the African American pilots known today as the Tuskegee Airmen. Critics have not been kind to Lucas' World War II saga. They complain about the depth of the characters and the cliche-ridden dialogue. Most damning are the concerns that the movie doesn't delve deeply enough into the battles against segregation that the airmen had to wage just to help defend their country in wartime.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'It's Top Gun with black pilots. " So Terrence Howard describes with a punchy tagline his film, Red Tails , a WWII actioner about the famed Tuskegee Airmen, the first group of African American fighter pilots in the U.S. armed forces. Conceived by George Lucas and in development for nearly 25 years, the Anthony Hemingway-helmed Red Tails is due Jan. 20, 2012. It is billed as a passionate statement about civil rights but also - or given marketing needs, above all - an epic Hollywood blockbuster filled with hair-raising set pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012
TERRENCE HOWARD didn't do much research for his role in "Red Tails. " Didn't have to. The movie's story, of the World War II Tuskegee Airmen, was one that he knew by heart. "I'd written reports about them in 1974, 1975. For my dad. That's how my daddy would discipline us," said Howard. "My dad was big on education, so I grew up knowing about the black pilots who shot down Nazi jets, and flew the P-51 Mustang. For me, the Mustang was always the airplane, not the car. " Howard admitted he needed the discipline of his dad's informal home schooling.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Looks like Red Tails , George Lucas' World War II biopic about the Tuskegee Airmen, made $19 million over the weekend. Decent, considering its limited opening in the dreaded dead zone between Christmas and the Oscars. I wasn't going to let ho-hum reviews stop me from seeing it. If anything, I went to honor men like Maj. John L. Harrison, one of the 320 surviving airmen (out of about 900) to receive a Congressional Gold Medal in 2007. Harrison saw it, too, and liked it. "I thought it was a superior depiction of aerial combat.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
I REMEMBER thinking "The Help," for a civil rights movie, had an unseemly fixation on fashion and furnishings. Because, I guess, I'm a dude. Watching "Red Tails," a World War II movie about the proto-civil rights heroes known as the Tuskegee Airmen, I certainly didn't mind that it was also a movie about really cool airplanes. Doing really cool things, such as flying head-to-head against the German Me 262s, the world's first combat fighter jets, part of Adolf Hitler's growing arsenal of game-changing weapons that the Tuskegee pilots helped destroy before those weapons could alter the balance of war. In doing so, they helped to free the world from delusional master race ideology - ironic, since the black fighter pilots of the 332nd Fighter Group had to fight racism at home in order to earn the right to kill Nazis over Italy, France and Germany.
NEWS
November 11, 2011
In a moving scene from a new documentary about the Tuskegee Airmen, African American pilots stage a peaceful sit-in at an all-white military facility. Their courage, and the battles they fought during World War II both on the battlefield and at home, are recounted in Double Victory, filmmaker George Lucas' attempt to promote more awareness of the Tuskegee Airmen. The film's release on Veteran's Day, and coinciding with the 70th anniversary of the airmen's first class of cadets, is fitting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2011 | By Mia Mask, For The Inquirer
When you think about World War II, military leaders such as George S. Patton and Douglas MacArthur often come to mind. But how much do you know about the Tuskegee Airmen? Now's your chance to learn about the first African American military pilots, who fought valiantly against fascism during the war. The African American Museum in Philadelphia is offering a free screening Thursday night of Double Victory, a new documentary by filmmaker George Lucas about the recruitment, training, and combat missions of the Tuskegee Airmen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
FOR MT. AIRY'S Eugene J. Richardson Jr., the last few months have been a whirlwind. Manhattan parties with George Lucas, Spike Lee, Terrence Howard, Cuba Gooding Jr. He's been an honored guest at several movie screenings, a couple of premieres, walked the red carpet, had his photo taken, given interviews, stood for applause and ovations. It's all well-deserved. And about 60 years overdue. All the recent excitement in Richardson's life surrounds the release of the new movie "Red Tails," an action picture celebrating the service of African-American fighter pilots in World War II, the so-called Tuskegee Airmen, including men like Richardson.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John H. Grant Sr., 85, of Philadelphia, an aircraft mechanic with the famed Tuskegee Airmen, died Monday, May 6, at the hospice unit at Women's Medical Hospital after a short illness. Mr. Grant graduated with honors from Tuskegee (Ala.) Institute in 1949 with a major in aircraft technology. He served in the Army as an aircraft mechanic based in Guam, maintaining tplanes for the airmen, the first African Americans to take to the skies on behalf of the United States. He told his son, John Jr., that he believed the aviators never received the respect they deserved.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
LUMBERTON - The large tree stump at Main and Landing Streets had bothered Tommy Shover since he took down the rest of the diseased red oak about five years ago. What could he do with it? As general foreman of Lumberton's public works department, he could saw it off to the ground - or he could ask his brother Guy to turn it into a work of art. And that's what happened Sunday while a small crowd watched mesmerized. Motorists opened their windows to offer praise every time the corner traffic light turned red. Over about 10 hours, the eyesore became a graceful bird in flight, the inner wood grain beautifully mimicking the feathers of the wings.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John H. Grant Sr., 85, of Philadelphia, an aircraft mechanic with the famed Tuskegee Airmen, died Monday, May 6, at the hospice unit at Women's Medical Hospital after a short illness. Mr. Grant graduated with honors from Tuskegee (Ala.) Institute in 1949 with a major in aircraft technology. He served in the Army as an aircraft mechanic based in Guam, maintaining tplanes for the airmen, the first African Americans to take to the skies on behalf of the United States. He told his son, John Jr., that he believed the aviators never received the respect they deserved.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the red-tailed hawk laid her first egg last Monday, birders knew they were in for an Easter egg treat. In each of the last four springs, the hawk, known as a formel haggard but called "Mom" by her fans, laid three eggs three days apart. If the pattern continued, Monday's egg would be followed by a second on Thursday, which it was. And as hawk watchers monitored a webcam feed streamed online by the Franklin Institute, they saw a third egg appear Sunday morning. "You can see things happen that you're not really supposed to see, because normally these nests are at the top of pine trees or at the top of cliffs," said Della Micah, a self-described hawk fanatic.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Israeli American film director Oren Peli took theaters by storm with Paranormal Activity in 2009, a micro-budget, do-it-yourself haunted-house story that became an international phenomenon. He puts his screen smarts to good use as creator of the ABC horror/fantasy television show The River, an engaging, exciting supernatural adventure about a scientist and Steve Irwin-esque TV show host, Dr. Emmet Cole (Bruce Greenwood), who goes missing while searching in the Amazon for magic.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
George Lucas, the legendary director of the Star Wars saga, should have taken a few down-to-earth meetings with master storyteller Bertram Levy before he made Red Tails , the story of the African American pilots known today as the Tuskegee Airmen. Critics have not been kind to Lucas' World War II saga. They complain about the depth of the characters and the cliche-ridden dialogue. Most damning are the concerns that the movie doesn't delve deeply enough into the battles against segregation that the airmen had to wage just to help defend their country in wartime.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Looks like Red Tails , George Lucas' World War II biopic about the Tuskegee Airmen, made $19 million over the weekend. Decent, considering its limited opening in the dreaded dead zone between Christmas and the Oscars. I wasn't going to let ho-hum reviews stop me from seeing it. If anything, I went to honor men like Maj. John L. Harrison, one of the 320 surviving airmen (out of about 900) to receive a Congressional Gold Medal in 2007. Harrison saw it, too, and liked it. "I thought it was a superior depiction of aerial combat.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Underworld Awakening , with Kate Beckinsale back in the role of vampire avenger Selene, awoke to the top spot in the weekend's box-office sweepstakes, with total receipts of $25.4 million in the United States and Canada, according to studio estimates. Beckinsale appeared in the first two installments of the undead franchise, but sat out the third. In Underworld Awakening , the fourth in the series, Beckinsale returns as Selene, newly thawed and cranky after 12 years of cryogenic freezing.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Cuba Gooding Jr. is one of the veteran Tuskegee Airmen. That is, the actor plays a base commander in the new, George Lucas -produced Red Tails, an action-packed account of the daring aerial exploits of the famed all-black flying unit of World War II. And Gooding was one of the young African American aces who took to the skies to shoot down Nazis in 1995's HBO drama The Tuskegee Airmen . Both films show...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012
TERRENCE HOWARD didn't do much research for his role in "Red Tails. " Didn't have to. The movie's story, of the World War II Tuskegee Airmen, was one that he knew by heart. "I'd written reports about them in 1974, 1975. For my dad. That's how my daddy would discipline us," said Howard. "My dad was big on education, so I grew up knowing about the black pilots who shot down Nazi jets, and flew the P-51 Mustang. For me, the Mustang was always the airplane, not the car. " Howard admitted he needed the discipline of his dad's informal home schooling.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
I REMEMBER thinking "The Help," for a civil rights movie, had an unseemly fixation on fashion and furnishings. Because, I guess, I'm a dude. Watching "Red Tails," a World War II movie about the proto-civil rights heroes known as the Tuskegee Airmen, I certainly didn't mind that it was also a movie about really cool airplanes. Doing really cool things, such as flying head-to-head against the German Me 262s, the world's first combat fighter jets, part of Adolf Hitler's growing arsenal of game-changing weapons that the Tuskegee pilots helped destroy before those weapons could alter the balance of war. In doing so, they helped to free the world from delusional master race ideology - ironic, since the black fighter pilots of the 332nd Fighter Group had to fight racism at home in order to earn the right to kill Nazis over Italy, France and Germany.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|