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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
DIRECTOR LEE DANIELS and stars Cuba Gooding Jr. and Yaya Alafia walked the red carpet at the Kimmel Center last night at the premiere of "Lee Daniels' The Butler," the story of Cecil Gaines ( Forest Whitaker ), a man who served in the White House under eight presidents. "I demanded it, I told Mr. [ Harvey ] Weinstein it must be!" Daniels, who grew up in Wynnefield, said with dramatic flair about why he wanted a local premiere. "[Philadelphia] is safe, it's home.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013
THE WAIT for Leslie Odom Jr.'s "Smash" close-up is nearly over. The Philadelphia-raised actor was promoted to a regular this season. That was mostly good news for his character, Sam, who went from the chorus of "Bombshell" to a principal role in the "Book of Mormon" tour, leaving behind his boyfriend Tom (Christian Borle) and best friend Ivy (Megan Hilty). Maybe less so for Odom, who's been missing from "Smash" for weeks (along, sadly, with much of the original audience). Sam returns in the March 26 episode - the last before "Smash" moves to 9 p.m. Saturdays April 6 - and he's back with a big solo.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry L. Moore never stopped moving. Born in tiny Ocilla, Ga., in 1921, he was out by 19, after graduating at the top of Ocilla High's Class of 1940. He moved to Newark, N.J., to escape the poverty and racism that had marked his childhood. By 1942, he was on a bus full of draftees en route to Fort Dix, and by 1944, he was in Italy, working on B-25 bombers as a member of the Tuskegee Airmen - the first black aviators to serve in the U.S. military. Then it was off to West Virginia State University, where he earned a physics degree, and a career as a naval researcher.
FOOD
September 9, 1990 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
My Italian is wobbly, but I feel pretty safe in guessing that girasole means sunflower in that language. At Girasole Ristorante in Center City, sunflower portraits line the walls. Baby sunflowers grace the pristine marble tables. There's the sunflower logo on matches, menus and china. It's even on the salt and pepper shakers there. Dark and womblike when it was Il Nedo, the restaurant at 13th and Locust Streets is now as bright as a Mediterranean kitchen, thanks to an angled floor-to-ceiling front window that floods the place with sunlight.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Contributors include the Associated Press, the New York Post and the New York Daily News
Today is a blue suede day for Elvis fans. Starting this morning, diehard fans and anyone else who cares can cast a ballot in the U.S. Postal Service's election to decide which image of the king of rock and roll will grace a new postal stamp. Will it be the sleek young heartthrob in jacket and tie? Or the older Las Vegas superstar decked out in white rhinestone jumpsuit? Elvis fans have waged philosophical battles for months, but the contest is still too close to call. Ballots will be available at post offices nationwide and in the April 13 issue of People magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1986 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hey, parents. He-man got you down? Sesame Street lost its snap? All Smurfed out? Well, there's hope in sight. Tomorrow marks the Philadelphia debut of RosenShontz, a two-man group that sings children's songs. But relax - these songs have nothing in common with, say, The Chipmunks Do Disco. They are snappy, bright, funny and often topical. For example, one RosenShontz song is about a punked-out teddy bear. One is about the problem of pollution and another is about the problem of a too-early bedtime.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1997 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, the 17th-century satirist who called himself Moliere, might be hard-pressed to recognize his 1671 farce The Tricks of Scapin in the irreverent production that Bill Irwin and Mark O'Donnell have adapted for the Roundabout Theatre Company. Which is not to say that he wouldn't have a high old time. Scapin - the abbreviated title is its only touch of reserve - is an uninhibited romp, an actor-driven delight that remains firmly grounded in the physical, improvisatory conventions of Moliere's day even as it mocks them.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
IN THE BACK of the paper, the Super Bowl is football. On the Tattle page, it's an entertainment showcase - center of the universe for the rich and powerful and beautiful - and actors with shows on CBS. As part of the actual game broadcast, viewers got Beyonce and a Destiny's Child reunion at halftime, Jennifer Hudson fronting the Sandy Hook Elementary School Chorus on a pregame "America the Beautiful" and Alicia Keys on a super slo-mo rendition of...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
IT SEEMS LIKE Forbes publishes one of its highest-paid-celebrity lists every few weeks, but maybe that's just because Oprah Winfrey is always on top. So what if OWN is searching for viewers the way presidential candidates are searching for undecided voters, Oprah still topped this year's Forbes celebrity-earners list, netting $165 million in the fiscal year ending in May. Yes, it's $125 million down from the year before, but here at Tattle,...
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Wim Wenders was two weeks away from the start date for his new film when his star - Philippina "Pina" Bausch , the German choreographer - died. She had cancer, and had been diagnosed only five days earlier. "We had been talking about making this together for almost 20 years," says Wenders, who had finally figured out how to go about doing his documentary - in 3-D - when Bausch died. "We were so happy that after 20 years of stalling, Pina and I were finally now on. " And then came the news of her death.
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