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Red Tape

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NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Wednesday morning, roofer Dennis Carey put the finishing touches on the new roof at the Junod Playground in Parkwood. It should have been a happy moment for the folks at the recreation center on Dunks Ferry Road, who had waited five years for just this event. No longer will workers have to worry about getting hit in the head by a falling ceiling tile. No longer will the 200-odd neighborhood youngsters who frequent the center have to dodge buckets as they shape ceramics.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Despite a law requiring the Defense Department to buy commercial goods off the shelf when possible, the Pentagon continues to require its suppliers to meet reams of mind-numbing requirements for the most mundane items. Take, for example, the T-shirt. The Pentagon now issues 30 pages of tiny print to its suppliers on how white the T-shirts must be, how many stitches per inch their seams must have, and even what kind of bags to use for packing them. Excessive specifications have angered members of Congress, who recently heard the Pentagon's top clothes buyer concede that only seven of the 8,000 items he purchases are bought commercially, without pages of Pentagon particulars mandating every detail.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | By Kathy Sheehan, Daily News Staff Writer
This is a story about cash on a wet tin roof. It's about cash scratched up by a mall developer to fix a leaky roof at a city recreation center in the Far Northeast, cash that can't be spent because of red tape. "It's frustrating. It's just extremely frustrating," said Kathy Dieckmann, volunteer president of the Junod Recreation Center Advisory Council on Dunks Ferry Road in the Parkwood section. The roof at the center has been leaking for about five years, and the city has no plans to fix it because of budget constraints.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | By Laurie Kalmanson, Special to The Inquirer
Running a community Kite Day isn't as simple as going down to the five-and- dime store, buying all the flying machines and string in stock and handing out the fragile contraptions free to the kids who show up. First, permission from the Federal Aviation Administration is needed. "You have to tell them how big the kites are, how high they're going to fly and how close you are to an airport," said Fred Durso, 46, who was the government relations coordinator for the Knights of Columbus Kite Day in Gloucester Township this weekend.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a month, the young Egyptian had been trying to pay the speeding ticket and get her driver's license back. First, she was told to go to the Nile Delta city of Banha, where the license was issued. In Banha, she was told that because she lived in Cairo now, the matter would have to be resolved there. In Cairo, the police said they could not return her license until she paid the fine. In Banha, of course. She decided to forget about the old license and apply for a new one. At the local driver-testing center, a friendly policeman waived the road test, signed the necessary papers and directed her to the cashier's window.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
There is a happy ending to the story of the Swarthmore couple who had been fighting red tape in an effort to get their adopted Nicaraguan daughter into this country. James and Judy Shepard-Kegl got the necessary visa for their daughter Luisa on Jan. 10. The trio flew into Philadelphia International Airport from Nicaragua on Monday night. In late December, Judy Shepard-Kegl went to Nicaragua to complete the adoption. According to the couple, the Nicaraguan officials were extremely cooperative, but U.S. embassy officials were not. "I spent the first couple of days in Nicaragua finishing the adoption procedure," said Judy Shepard-Kegl.
NEWS
December 6, 1986
I spent four hours of a recent workday on the phone trying to find a drug treatment center for a cocaine-addicted friend. Although he was in a crisis and threatening suicide, no one would help because he did not have insurance or a medical assistance card. I called the Department of Public Welfare, Gaudenzia House, Giuffre Hospital, the Diagnostic Rehabilitation Center, the Cocaine Hotline, St. Mary's Hospital, the Office of Mental Health and Retardation, the Drug Enforcement Agency and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP)
BUSINESS
May 21, 1993 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Bernard Spain said he expected a little cooperation from City Hall when he expanded his business. After all, he is chief executive of Spain's Inc., which owns 33 stores and employs 370 people in the city, and pays, well, a lot of taxes. But when Spain's tried to open a new Hallmark Cards store in Northeast Philadelphia this month, he said the company was treated like a criminal. The Department of Licenses and Inspections angrily threatened to prevent the opening because Spain's forgot to apply for electrical and sprinkler permits, although a building permit had been issued.
NEWS
May 28, 1989 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
While in Europe we want to visit some cities in East Germany that are rich in the history of Bach and Luther. Can this be arranged after arrival in West Germany? Whom do we contact? You need to make at least some arrangements in advance if you want to visit such cities as Leipzig, where Johann Sebastian Bach was a choirmaster and where the Bach museum is located, or Wartburg, where Martin Luther is said to have thrown an inkwell at the devil. It is possible to obtain tourist visas at East German border points and elsewhere in Europe, but you are likely to need proof of prepaid hotel reservations as well as other application information.
NEWS
March 23, 1988 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Almost two years ago, when Augustine Carmona was just 14, he sneaked alone across the Mexican border to escape a bitter fate. Behind him were a broken home and severe poverty in the village of Yurira, and the certainty that his education would never go beyond the sixth grade. Carmona, athletic and intelligent, came to Kennett Square, where a brother works in the mushroom camps. He was taken in by a local woman, worked his way onto the Unionville Middle School's honor roll and became the Chester County school's soccer star.
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NEWS
February 28, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday approved regulating the Internet as a utility in a 3-2 partisan vote, handing a big victory to Net neutrality proponents who lobbied for a decade for tough rules to protect consumers. The FCC's action forbids telecom companies from blocking websites, and slowing or speeding up some Internet traffic. This means that all Internet streams should be treated the same, or neutrally, without preferences. The FCC also voted to make it easier for municipally run Internet providers to expand and compete with Comcast and other private telecom companies, a move lauded by activist groups.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two medical-marijuana dispensaries in New Jersey announced a month ago that they would soon produce cannabis edibles, lotions, lozenges, and a patch that would slowly deliver pain relief. Many patients have been anxiously waiting for these new products to become available as it would allow them to use marijuana to alleviate symptoms associated with cancer, multiple sclerosis, and other serious ailments without having to smoke. But the rosy outlook seen in May has withered. In a four-year-old medical-marijuana program marred by missteps and delay, the edibles are the latest to face a halting and bewildering state approval process.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Red tape? Wayne Mills Co. Inc. thrives on it. Not the torturous-regulation kind, but the thin woven ties behind the expression "cut through the red tape. " Last year, Wayne Mills supplied more than 100,000 yards of it, used mostly in courthouses and law offices to bind official documents. The 104-year-old North Philadelphia weaver of narrow fabrics has had that line of business since the 1940s. Not that this manufacturer of rare longevity is a one-trick loom. Housed in a redbrick complex with Southern yellow pine floors and wood-beam ceilings across the tracks from SEPTA's Wayne Junction station, Wayne Mills exists now - into the sixth generation of its founding family, the Milneses - because, like the yarn it weaves, it has remained pliable.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Under the Soviets, the work of Lithuania's textile makers was considered strictly decorative, traditional tapestries with limited, if any, narrative content. At home and in the studio, however, those same textile and fiber artists were often as experimental as any other artists. Now, 22 years after independence, they are working at an astonishing level of sophistication, a phenomenon made immediately clear by the Philadelphia Art Alliance's "LTextile: Contemporary Textiles From Lithuania.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I found the perfect man for Mother Mary: Uncle Sam. Why not? They'd be great for each other. Uncle Sam may be over 200 years old, but he's got plenty of life left in him. After all, we just found out that he sicced the IRS on tea party groups and spied on a hundred AP reporters. In other words, he's an active senior. A very active senior. Or maybe a hyperactive senior. But still, he's just the type of man that Mother Mary needs. He's tall, handsome, and he spends money like there's no tomorrow.
NEWS
October 27, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Montgomery County hopes to revolutionize the way constituents connect with county services. A new program aims to streamline services for residents, who often need help from multiple agencies and are at a loss about where to begin. "There are people who just don't know what to do. Or people who've been told five different things and not been successful," said Eric Goldstein, director of the Behavioral Health/Developmental Disabilities Department. Instead of the typical "silo" approach - in which each department works in isolation and constituents must figure out the system on their own - the county wants to have a one-stop shop in each community where a constituent could speak to a single person.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County woman who voluntarily distributes free food to children from her driveway has run afoul of officials in Chester Township who say her efforts violate zoning ordinances. If Angela Prattis, 41, a married mother of three and the youth director of her church, does not come up with $1,000 to pay for a zoning hearing within the next year, she'll be barred from feeding young people next summer, officials have said. "It's unbelievable," said Prattis, a trained volunteer with the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's Nutritional Development Services, which supplies lunch and snacks five days a week.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Delaware County woman who voluntarily distributes free food to children from her driveway has run afoul of officials in Chester Township who say her efforts violate zoning ordinances. If Angela Prattis, 41, a married mother of three and the youth director of her church, does not come up with $1,000 to pay for a zoning hearing within the next year, she'll be barred from feeding young people next summer, officials have said. "It's unbelievable," said Prattis, a trained volunteer with the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's Nutritional Development Services, which supplies lunch and snacks five days a week.
SPORTS
August 15, 2012 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
THEY ARE FINALLY going to build that Urban Youth Academy we were promised 23 months ago, first multisite campus, first cold-weather city. The light at the end of the cluttered, narrow tunnel may be a bulldozer after all. "We're going to get it built," Frank Robinson growled the other day, "and we're going to do it right!" Frank Robinson? Yep, that Frank Robinson, MVP in both leagues, first black manager in major league baseball. Robinson's voice always had gravel in it. His tone always had steel.
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