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Redesign

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NEWS
August 12, 1990 | By Marjorie Keen, Special to The Inquirer
Federal and state environmental agencies have ordered a housing developer to change part of the main road in a Valley Township area where about 100 families live. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state Department of Environmental Resources have told Kenneth C. Hellings, president of KCH Developers Inc. of Exton, that he must redesign a 500-foot stretch of Pine Valley Drive where it connects townhouses and single homes in Country Club Valley. That portion of the road also serves as a 17-foot dam over a tributary to Rock Run stream.
NEWS
May 26, 1986 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
The Willistown Planning Commission has asked the developer of the Willistown Woods II townhouse complex on Street Road south of West Chester Pike to redesign its internal road system. At a meeting Wednesday night, commission members said that the relocation of several buildings in the 204-unit development and the addition of roads would make it easier for drivers of tractor-trailers and fire trucks to maneuver. Stuart Lundy, an attorney for developer Edward Weingartner, said that the redesign would not be a problem, but that it would take time.
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Lower Merion school board has hired an architect to redesign Merion School, renovated for open classrooms in 1970, as a more traditional school. The board hired Dagit-Saylor Architects of Philadelphia on Monday night to conduct a study of the school on Bowman Avenue. The construction of walls and sound barriers will be considered. The firm also will examine how to improve heating and ventilation in the building. The study is expected to cost up to $10,000. "We have been moving away from the open-school concept in the last five to six years," said Merion principal Marvin Gold.
NEWS
July 15, 1998
Your two-page layout (July 2) gives the reader a good insight into Independence Mall redesign. However, I have questions: As a taxpayer, I am wondering why we are spending so much on a new Visitors Center when we have a perfectly adequate one between Chestnut and Walnut streets on 3rd. What will happen to this facility? As a tour guide for several years, I have asked visitors about this project. Most say the mall, as it now stands, is fine. Adding a Constitution Center does not seem to appeal one way or another.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | By Laurie Halse Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
When the developers of theCharlestowne subdivision in Towamencin Township visit municipal hall, they have learned to go weighted down with armloads of maps and plans in anticipation of the protracted discussions with township officials. Representatives of the James Lewis Group were pleasantly shocked Wednesday, when the supervisors quickly indicated that they would give preliminary plan approval to the last section of the development that requires approval at their next meeting.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By Ward Allebach, Special to The Inquirer
Montgomery Township Supervisors Monday night turned down the county planning board's request to have a developer redesign a 386-unit complex a year after the township Planning Commission had approved it. Board of Supervisors Vice Chairman Richard H. Gebelein said the county board was "a day late and $100,000 short" in its request, referring to the estimated cost of redesign. Township Planning Commission members approved the proposal in June 1988 after determining that it met the requirements of the township's "clustering" ordinance.
NEWS
September 17, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square is nearing the end of a $12 million redesign of the Main Conservatory's eastern wing, long considered the "crown jewel" of the Philadelphia region's most popular public garden. This being Longwood, a former du Pont estate with deep pockets, the yearlong construction project includes many marvels - a new main entrance to the East Conservatory, a record-busting green wall, a dramatic terraced slope, and an attractive, open venue for outdoor performances, special events, and educational programs.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The architects for the Blue Bell office of Roach Brothers Realtors have won a second award for their redesign of a farmhouse built in 1750. The National Association of Realtors has selected the office as one of the five best real estate office designs in the nation in 1988. The office will be featured in the association's October issue of its trade magazine, Real Estate Today. In February, Roach Brothers and the architects, Ann Capron Architects and Philadelphia Design Company, were given the Planning Merit Award by the Montgomery County Planning Commission for successfully adapting a historic building.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1989 | By Tom Webb, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After 80 years of silently gazing from the U.S. penny, Abraham Lincoln is in for a surprise: He may get a face lift. For the first time in decades, Congress is on the verge of approving a redesign for America's most popular coins - not just Mr. Lincoln's copper penny but also the nickel, the dime, the quarter and the half-dollar. "We're the only Western country in the world that hasn't changed its coins in recent years," said Diane Wolf, commissioner of the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
The people who presided over our dirt naps used to be called undertakers. They then metamorphosed into morticians before finally becoming funeral directors. Auto mechanics are now technicians, and store clerks are called associates. Army manuals refer to retreat as retrograde motion. Prisons have become correctional institutions. Suffice it to say that Americans love euphemisms, and just about every group has some. Certainly, the auto industry has its share. Have you noticed, for example, that cars don't have bumpers anymore?
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NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
IF YOU'RE AN EDUCATOR, researcher, parent or institution with a bold plan to transform a Philadelphia public school, today could be your lucky day. The school district announced yesterday that it is seeking applications for a second round of the School Redesign Initiative, with the goal of boosting student achievement at current neighborhood schools. It is also inviting education buffs to propose, design and help run new high schools. The district opened three new high schools in September, while the first four schools chosen for the Redesign Initiative will implement their plans next fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Given the ice crust encasing our streets right now, this might seem to be a strange moment to ponder what makes a good playground. A kid is lucky to gulp a few breaths of fresh air in the minutes between school and home. It feels as if it will be months before the slides are warm enough to touch again. When the thaw does come, as it inevitably will, most children will race out to the kind of playgrounds that feature mass-produced plastic forts done up in circus-inspired colors and perched on spongy mats.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
The Dodge Challenger with the 707-horsepower Hellcat engine is what the auto industry calls a halo car. That means it's a sexy siren that draws customers into the showroom - where they usually proceed to buy something cheaper and/or more practical. That "something," in the case of the Challenger, might well be the SXT Plus model, whose $29,995 price tag is half that of the Hellcat. The V-6-powered SXT Plus is machinery for people who want that powerful, muscle-car look it shares with its more powerful V-8 brethren like the Hellcat but don't want the considerable extra expense those models incur.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THREE YEARS ago, Tilden Middle School was making headlines for all the wrong reasons. As one of more than 50 schools in the Philadelphia School District snared in a cheating scandal, Tilden's scores on state standardized tests were invalidated. Its principal was transferred and later fired. The school was in turmoil. But administrators, faculty and staff at the school, at 66th Street and Elmwood Avenue, in Southwest Philly, again are dreaming big. And they're getting closer to making those dreams reality.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE SCHOOL district yesterday announced that four schools were selected to take part in its new School Redesign Initiative, which encourages community members and educators to collaborate to turn around low-performing schools. The schools chosen for the initiative are Tilden Middle School, on Elmwood Avenue near 66th Street in Southwest Philadelphia; Chester A. Arthur Elementary School, on Catharine Street near 20th in Southwest Center City; Laura H. Carnell Elementary School, on Devereaux Avenue near Summerdale in Oxford Circle; and J.S. Jenks Academy for the Arts and Sciences, on Germantown Avenue near Southampton in Chestnut Hill.
REAL_ESTATE
November 10, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Condo and apartment buildings are getting designed and renovated common spaces, indoor and outdoor, that look and feel more like hotels. It's happening at addresses such as 2116 Chestnut, Park Towne Place, and the Granary. These areas now offer everything from juice bars to tech stations, where residents can recharge themselves and their devices, check e-mail, or print tickets and boarding passes. A building's lobby used to be thought of as a place people circulated through, as opposed to congregating in. "In recent years, residential developers have taken lessons from the hospitality industry and started to rethink how common areas can be utilized to engender a greater sense of community and social interaction," said Neil Rubler, who is redeveloping 251 DeKalb in King of Prussia.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
The Ford Mustang is as American and as mythical as the western movie. It is a ubiquitous resident of our culture. During a half-century of continuous production, Ford has sold us nine million of them. (Mine was a 1973 gold metallic coupe with the 5-liter V-8 and the four-speed manual gearbox.) And those who haven't owned one have seen them countless times on the road and on the screen. (Remember the chase scene in Bullitt when Steve McQueen's Mustang became airborne on the streets of San Francisco?
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Once again, we are reminded that the Korean automaker Hyundai, like its corporate sibling, Kia, is a pretty quick study. A case in point is the redesigned 2015 Genesis, the second coming of its luxury sedan. The first-generation Genesis, which debuted in 2009, offered a lot of features for the buck, and pretty much went downhill from there. The styling lurked somewhere between bland and generic, and the ride and handling were even more forgettable. Enter the renaissance redesign for 2015, an automotive quantum leap.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Since Toyota's Lexus luxury line debuted 25 years ago, no one has accused the brand of wild and crazy styling. Conservatism has been its designers' North Star, typically resulting in bodywork as forgettable as it is well-crafted. In recent times, the brand's brain trust has apparently come to the conclusion that stylish, distinctive design is part of what makes a luxury car special. As a consequence, it seems to have made a serious effort to put some pizzazz in its styling, to make a Lexus look luxurious.
NEWS
May 8, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IF ALL GOES according to plan during the next few years, Bainbridge Green could blossom into a gem of a gathering spot for the Queen Village community. What's that? You say you've never heard of Bainbridge Green? Then pull up a chair, dear reader. If you've ever embarked on an expletive-filled attempt to find parking near the funky mix of shops and restaurants that inhabit South Street, there's a good chance you've turned down nearby Bainbridge Street, where dozens of parking spots ring a pair of narrow, tree-lined islands between 3rd Street and Passyunk Avenue.
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