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Redevelopment

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NEWS
September 28, 2010 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
The massive $1.2 billion redevelopment plan of the Cramer Hill neighborhood in Camden led to protests against eminent domain and lawsuits before it finally collapsed. Now, the still-notorious attempt at redevelopment and gentrification has played a part in two federal indictments. "That's beautiful!" said Mary Cortes, a community activist who opposed the plan because 1,200 families were due to be displaced. "Justice is getting done, finally. " Camden's former state senator, Wayne Bryant, a political powerhouse in this impoverished city even though he lived in suburban Lawnside, is already in prison on separate corruption charges.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drawing on their religious faith and their financial resources, local Episcopalians have decided to invest $1 million in the redevelopment of poor communities in the Philadelphia area. The investment was announced yesterday by Bishop Allen L. Bartlett Jr., head of the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania. The money will go to the Delaware Valley Community Reinvestment Fund, which lends money for community development projects, especially those that create low-income housing. The church hopes to raise $5 million for community redevelopment over the next five years, the bishop said during a news conference at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church on Rittenhouse Square.
NEWS
August 21, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Harrison Township Committee rescinded a resolution Monday to designate parts of Main Street in Mullica Hill as an area in need of redevelopment, in response to fierce public backlash over fears of eminent domain. The vote came 11 days after a citizens committee formed to block the proposal circulated letters warning property owners of a government "land grab. " Mayor Louis Manzo said the township had planned to use the designation only to benefit property owners. The township expects that 51 acres of privately owned farmland behind Main Street will be developed in the next couple of years.
NEWS
May 6, 1998 | By David Hafetz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Township officials will meet with a private developer this week to sign an agreement that could lead to redevelopment of the long defunct Willingboro Plaza. ReNEWal Realty LLC would become partners with the township in cleaning up the plaza, which is polluted with asbestos and contaminated by underground fuel-storage tanks. Stephen R. Jaffe, a Cherry Hill-based environmental lawyer representing the firm, said ReNEWal would decide tomorrow whether to sign a redevelopment agreement with Willingboro.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | By Kathryn Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
The Bristol Borough Planning Commission on Monday reviewed the progress of two major redevelopment projects - Riverfront North and Gateway. The update came from Robert Dusek of Direction Associates, of Spring House, the borough's planning consultant. He is working jointly with the borough and the borough's redevelopment authority. Dusek described the 32-acre Riverfront North development parcel, which includes the condemned Superior Zinc plant, as a "magnificent resource. " The property has attracted interest from potential developers, Dusek said.
NEWS
August 31, 1986 | By Curtis Rist, Special to The Inquirer
In 1970, when the last of the rubber and textile mills were pulling out of Passaic, New Jersey's oldest industrial city, the city government came up with a plan to spruce up the decaying downtown and catch up on lost revenues. The goal was to turn Passaic into the shopping capital of the state. But the plans didn't go anywhere - until a year ago, when a devastating fire took care of the decaying downtown by destroying much of it. A year later, some people in Passaic think the fire was the best thing to happen to the city in decades.
NEWS
November 1, 2006
Redevelopment has to be the strategy if old, built-out Camden County is to increase revenue while keeping property taxes in check. It's proper, then, for voters to judge county freeholders by how they're handling redevelopment. About $2 billion of redevelopment work is on the drawing board or under way. But the county has bobbled some key projects, such as the Pennsauken Mart site. Voters in Tuesday's freeholder election must consider which candidates can best overcome past stumbles.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying it had run out of patience with the owners of long-neglected commercial properties, Evesham's township council has embarked on a plan to revitalize or even condemn sites it deems blighted or eyesores. "It's hammer time," Mayor Randy Brown told the council Tuesday night after its members agreed informally to begin establishing a redevelopment plan with authority to designate the properties and take steps to improve them. Under state guidelines, a redevelopment plan allows municipalities to grant tax incentives of up to 30 years for the improvement of sites deemed unsafe, unsanitary, or abandoned, and to use eminent domain to seize sites whose owners persistently neglect them.
REAL_ESTATE
July 11, 1999 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Traveling down the roadways of Bensalem Township, Joseph DiGirolamo sits behind the steering wheel of his van, enumerating the township projects that have been completed or begun since voters decided to go to a strong mayor/council form of government in 1990. "We've redeveloped a good deal of the commercial area in the township," DiGirolamo said. "One shopping center had 13 empty sites. Now it only has two. We've redone the township roads. "We're buying more land for our Central Park, which surrounds the township building.
NEWS
June 24, 2004 | By Tom Knoche
The situation unfolding with regard to Cramer Hill in Camden, Petty's Island, and the Pennsauken riverfront is loaded with opportunities. Unfortunately, it is about to become a litany of mistakes and missed opportunities because of poor public leadership, bad planning, and a lack of vision. Cherokee Investment Partners has proposed a $2.2 billion investment - $1.2 billion in the Cramer Hill neighborhood and $1 billion in Pennsauken. Most of the land it would redevelop is waterfront, including Petty's Island, and much is vacant.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOUNT HOLLY The township council voted, 3-1, Monday to create a redevelopment zone, after listening to concerns expressed by about a dozen residents and shop owners who worry that their properties may be seized through eminent domain. The 30-acre zone includes 120 businesses and homes in the central part of the township, not far from Mount Holly Gardens, which was declared an "area in need of redevelopment" more than a decade ago, sparking litigation that headed to the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOUNT HOLLY The memory of bulldozers ripping apart rowhouses and menacing the holdouts in a neighborhood that was deemed blighted a decade ago now colors the debate over plans to declare another large area "in need of redevelopment. " The owners of 120 properties in a 30-acre section that borders the Mount Holly Gardens neighborhood recently received certified letters and notices that labeled most of their homes and shops dilapidated, substandard, obsolete, or outdated. The properties would be included in a new redevelopment zone.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOUNT HOLLY A decade after the Town Council decided to redevelop a blighted neighborhood, sparking litigation that headed to the U.S. Supreme Court, council now plans to designate a commercial section of the municipality as another "area in need of redevelopment. " The new proposal comes fresh after a settlement was reached with minority residents of the Mount Holly Gardens who had claimed they were being discriminated against because their homes were being bulldozed to make way for market-rate housing.
NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
HORSHAM According to a Navy report, the redevelopment of the former Willow Grove military base is expected to generate $928 million in construction costs, 10,000 jobs, and $15.6 million a year in new tax revenues for Horsham Township. Construction on the base is expected to stretch over the next 20 years, but the first glimpses of change may begin in early 2015, when the Horsham Land Redevelopment Authority (HLRA) hopes to begin construction on some of the 1,486 planned residential units.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
BURLINGTON COUNTY The state has awarded Burlington City $600,000 in federal housing, urban development, and other grants, funds that would help the redevelopment efforts of the struggling community along the Delaware River. The New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (DCA) this week announced that it would distribute $6 million in Small Cities Block Grants statewide, including the grant to the depressed city and an additional $700,000 to two other Burlington County municipalities.
REAL_ESTATE
October 28, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Even as an increasing number of home sales head to the settlement table, the luxury-rental market in the eight-county Philadelphia region grows stronger and more sustainable. The latest example, Rivergate, is rising on eight-plus acres of industrial land in Burlington County, along Bordentown's Delaware River waterfront - one piece of the estimated $300 million, 98-acre rehabilitation of what was, until the early 1980s, the site of North American Ship Salvage Co. Rivergate is a 159-unit, four-building luxury-rental venture developed by Sterling Properties of Livingston, N.J., which builds for-sale and rental housing and owns and manages apartment communities in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, and Connecticut.
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
There have been many incarnations of and near-deaths for the storied Levoy Theatre in Millville, Cumberland County, from vaudeville emporium, silent-film house, talkie movie palace, eventually to boarded-up old wreck. And it collapsed into a pile of rubble during an initial renovation in 2010 before being miraculously reborn into the sweet little jewel-box that has recently dominated efforts to redevelop Millville from beleaguered glass-factory town into a trendy arts district. This month, the 105-year-old Levoy (pronounced "LEE-voy" if you're from around there, "la-VOY" if you're not)
NEWS
August 21, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Harrison Township Committee rescinded a resolution Monday to designate parts of Main Street in Mullica Hill as an area in need of redevelopment, in response to fierce public backlash over fears of eminent domain. The vote came 11 days after a citizens committee formed to block the proposal circulated letters warning property owners of a government "land grab. " Mayor Louis Manzo said the township had planned to use the designation only to benefit property owners. The township expects that 51 acres of privately owned farmland behind Main Street will be developed in the next couple of years.
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Sporadic, scattershot, and slow, efforts to improve the White Horse Pike in Oaklyn may have succeeded in sprucing up the strip a bit but haven't reversed its fortunes. "We want things to move along," says Mayor Robert Forbes, a lifelong resident of the blue-collar suburb of 4,000 people, which designated the pike as a redevelopment zone in 2002. In the years since, some building owners "haven't done anything with their properties," the mayor says. "And if they're not going to do anything, we're going to help them.
NEWS
August 11, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Harrison Township proposal to designate part of Main Street in Mullica Hill as an area in need of redevelopment has residents and business owners up in arms over fears of eminent domain, even as the mayor insists that the designation would only strengthen their position on the market. The township expects that about 60 acres of farmland behind Main Street will be developed in the next couple of years. With that in mind, the planning board extended the redevelopment designation to the properties to make them more attractive to prospective buyers, should the current owners decide they want to sell sometime in the future.
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