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FOOD
December 17, 2009
The ever-improving Sidecar Bar, a pioneering gastropub in Graduate Hospital, took another step forward this fall with the addition of chef Brian Lofink. Formerly co-chef at Matyson off Rittenhouse Square, Lofink hasn't upscaled Sidecar's inventive bar fare so much as tweaked it with better ingredients. His nachos - usually a dish I dread - were an irresistible example. The gooey jack cheese has been replaced with a genuine Mexican melter - asadero. The salsa, a green tomatillo zinger studded with pineapple, jalapeƱo, and cilantro, was inspired by Lofink's brief stint with Bobby Flay.
NEWS
September 16, 2003 | Daily News wire services
WHAT'S THIS RECALL ABOUT? There are two issues: whether to remove Gov. Gray Davis from office for fiscal mismanagement by a simple majority vote, and who should be his successor, with the candidate out of the 135 on the ballot getting the most votes becoming governor if Davis is recalled. SO, WHAT HAPPENED? A three-judge panel from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco blocked - at least for seven days, pending appeal - California from holding any election on Oct. 7. The court agreed with the plaintiff, the American Civil Liberties Union, that the use of "antiquated" punch-card voting systems that California has already declared defective creates a substantial risk that some 40,000 votes will not be counted.
FOOD
July 8, 2010
Milan salad redux Under the orange umbrellas at Table 31's al fresco sibling, The Plaza Cafe, outside the Comcast Center, diners steeped in Philadelphiana can be seen smiling at the menu listing for the Milano Salad, a satisfyingly retro bowl that has passed this way before. It is quite simply - quite classically - a pile of crunchy iceberg lettuce tossed with lightened-up Russian-ish dressing, adorned with cubed tomato, hard-cooked egg, a sprinkle of peeled shrimp, and a shred of bacon - all the fun of a BLT, plus shrimp.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The maker of Redux, the diet drug withdrawn from the market after reports of heart-valve damage, yesterday released a study suggesting it doesn't cause leaky valves when taken for only several months. The study of 1,072 patients found no "statistically significant" increase in heart-valve leaks among those who took Redux, also called dexfenfluramine, for two to three months compared to those who took dummy pills, according to Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories in St. Davids. Both the company and the federal Food and Drug Administration called the findings "reassuring" for short-term Redux users, but agreed that the safety of longer use remained a question.
NEWS
April 28, 1995
Baseball's back and, for Phillies' fans, opening night in St. Louis seemed eerily like old times: An alleged ace relief pitcher with wild hair and a wilder fastball blew a win in the ninth inning. But Wednesday wasn't exactly like 1993: The erring closer was named Charlton, not Williams, and the opener was played in late April before a half- full, boo-filled stadium. Baseball returns to the Vet tonight, as the Phils play Pittsburgh. It's hard to predict how the city's notoriously judgmental fans will react as their wayward heroes showily beg forgiveness and spit sunflower seeds on the Vet's new carpet.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you haven't felt heat like this in awhile, you must have been out of town. For the 15th time this month, and the 24th time this year, the official temperature in Philadelphia hit 90 today, and was up to 93 at 2 p.m. at the airport. Yes, that's a lot of 90s. The long-term normal for the entire year is 26 days of 90 or better, with 17 of those by the end of July. The region is getting a minor puff of relief today in that the air isn't quite stuffed with water vapor, the relative humidity has dropped below 40 percent, and the heat indexes are staying in the 90s. But Wednesday could be significantly more uncomfortable, as the combination of an approaching front and an area of heat-pumping high pressure over the Atlantic combine to brew a water-vapor broth over the region.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1999 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Philadelphia yesterday rejected a proposed $100 million settlement by which a Lexington, Mass., company had hoped to untangle itself from hundreds of lawsuits over the once-popular diet drug Redux. U.S. District Judge Louis C. Bechtle ruled that a "limited fund" settlement that Interneuron Pharmaceuticals Inc. intended to set up to pay the injury claims by Redux users did not meet the standards of federal law. Bechtle said in a 34-page memorandum that he was uncertain whether the settlement was fair to all people who might have claims.
LIVING
June 10, 1996 | By Sally Squires, WASHINGTON POST Inquirer staff writer Susan FitzGerald contributed to this article
The first anti-obesity drug in more than two decades has arrived, marking a shift to the broader use of medication in fighting the battle of the bulge. Dexfenfluramine, which is being sold by prescription under the trade name Redux, can help dieters lose weight by controlling appetite. It works in the brain, altering the metabolism of a key brain chemical called serotonin. Some dieters are already familiar with a different version of fenfluramine if their doctors prescribe the weight-loss drug combination of fenfluramine-phentermine, known as "fen-phen.
NEWS
September 21, 1997
Redux is off the shelves. Last Tuesday, the Food and Drug Administration requested the recall of Redux and another diet drug, Pondimin. Wyeth-Ayerst of St. Davids, maker of Redux and distributor of Pondimin, voluntarily pulled them. Gone is a sure billion-dollar product. Gone is a 39 percent share of the entire diet-prescription market. Not gone are our national obsession with and prejudice against weight. That sad obsession, in part, drives the market. That prejudice, in part, fuels the desperation of some patients, who will try anything, side effects be damned.
NEWS
November 12, 1998 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Reuters contributed to this article
The latest studies of people who took the diet drugs Redux and fen-phen suggest their risk of heart-valve damage is small but real, and that the risk increased with duration of use. Redux and the chemically similar fenfluramine (the "fen" half of fen-phen) were pulled from the market 14 months ago by Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories amid concerns that they may cause leaky heart valves. (Phentermine, the "phen" half, remains on the market.) A major study by University of California at Irvine researchers, presented yesterday at the American Heart Association meeting in Dallas, compared about 1,000 Redux and fen-phen users to about 500 people who had not used diet drugs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2016 | By Julia M. Klein, For The Inquirer
With controversy over immigration, nativist tensions and gun violence dominating the news, the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's elegant production of West Side Story has a ripped-from-the-headlines feel. Instead of a border wall, set designer Steven TenEyck's chain-link fence represents the ethnic divides and misunderstandings that will lead to tragedy. There's more foreshadowing in the blood-red color of the tenements in which Tony and Maria, the show's contemporary Romeo and Juliet, pledge their undying love.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Robert Zemeckis is trying something beautiful, and perhaps impossible, in The Walk : to reclaim the Twin Towers, taking the World Trade Center edifices back from the nightmarish taint of terrorism, the trauma of 9/11, and celebrating human ambition, and folly, in the process. By bringing his visual mastery to bear on the story of Philippe Petit, the French daredevil who, in the summer of 1974, crossed the 140 feet between the New York skyscrapers, balancing on a cable 1,350 feet in the air, Zemeckis pulls off not only a dazzling optical illusion, but a historical illusion, too. Opening Wednesday in IMAX theaters and in wider release Oct. 9, The Walk feels like one of those '50s Hollywood spectacles - Around the World in 80 Days , say - only hyper-enhanced with cutting-edge digital and 3D technology.
FOOD
April 17, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
For decades, the Vesper Club was a Mad Men -ny, private dining club tucked on a Center City backstreet. On Friday nights from the mid-'50s through the late '70s, that's where you'd find Frank Rizzo, for example. Tastes changed, members died off, smoking was banned, and, in late 2012, it was booted from its home on Sydenham Street (near 15th and Locust Streets) pending the building's sale. The building returned this week as a supper-club-style restaurant open to the public, with nightly dancing and a downstairs bar that bans cell phones.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2015
HOLLYWOOD kept a low profile yesterday, when everyone who's everyone, including the nonstop partying (and according to TMZ, allegedly Rihanna lip-locking) Leonardo DiCaprio , ought to have stayed in their jammies and rehydrated themselves post Sunday's Golden Globes. In case you missed the endless awards-show rehash, the reviews and rumors went like this: Hosts Amy Poehler and Upper Darby's own Tina Fey dissed longtime Philadelphian Bill Cosby , and did a just-OK job co-mastering the ceremonies.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON At the Statehouse, if at first you don't succeed, try introducing the bill again. Gov. Christie may have shot down hundreds of bills last session, but that didn't stop lawmakers from moving forward Thursday with some of the same proposals. Bills brought back include one championed by the state's top elected Democrat to form a commission on college affordability - legislation the governor opposed as redundant - and a measure to ban pig gestation crates, which are decried by animal rights groups as inhumane.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terence Davies is quite possibly the greatest filmmaker you've never heard of. Celebrated pretty much only by cinephiles, the British writer-director, whose films include The Neon Bible , The House of Mirth , and Of Time and the City , has never attracted a mass audience. That will change, we hope, with the release of two of his films, the 2011 romantic drama, The Deep Blue Sea , and one of his greatest accomplishments, the 1992 masterpiece The Long Day Closes . Based on the 1952 play by Terence Rattigan and set five years after the end of World War II, The Deep Blue Sea stars Rachel Weisz as Hester Collyer, the dutiful but unfulfilled wife of the much older Sir William Collyer (Simon Russell Beale)
NEWS
May 30, 2013
OUR FIRST reaction to the good news that state Sen. Mike Stack is introducing bills in Harrisburg that would remove some of the legal obstacles that the city faces as it tries to collect on delinquent taxes was: How long has this been going on? We knew that the city has a pathetic history of collecting back taxes, but learning that state law has further hobbled the city from going after deadbeats is a rude surprise. The "culture of nonpayment" has been cited by many to explain how our collection performance is the worst of the country's biggest cities.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
By Jan C. Ting The so-called comprehensive immigration reform proposed by a group of senators and President Obama amounts to immediate amnesty for millions of immigration-law violators, and the lifting of limits on future immigration, with some window dressing designed to assuage skeptical voters. We've seen this act before. The 1986 amnesty promised to fix the immigration problem by granting amnesty to three million immigration-law violators, strengthening the border, and penalizing employers for hiring illegal immigrants.
NEWS
January 4, 2013
By Jay Mathews Few education experts have been as true to a seemingly unworkable idea as Richard D. Kahlenberg, an author and senior fellow at the Century Foundation. Since the 1990s, he has been the nation's leading exponent of socio-economic integration. That means he wants as many low-income students as possible to attend schools with a middle-class majority. As Kahlenberg notes in an illuminating new piece in American Educator magazine, research shows that poor kids transferred to schools with middle-class majorities do better on average than in schools with low-income majorities.
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