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NEWS
January 26, 2001 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
When "The Wedding Planner" opened in Los Angeles earlier this week, party planner to the stars Alyse Sobel watched with all the excitement of a first-time bride about to march down the aisle. Sobel, who coordinated the nuptials of such Hollywood stars as Blair Underwood and Marlee Matlin (not to each other), is the real-life wedding planner upon whom Jennifer Lopez's character is loosely based. The film is about a high-profile wedding planner who has all but given up on love until she meets a pediatrician played by Matthew McConaughey, whose wedding she is coordinating.
SPORTS
May 22, 1997 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
What living person, famous and flamboyant, is most often portrayed by the motion picture industry? If you guessed Donald Trump, you'd be wrong. And, no, it's not Michael Jackson, Ted Kennedy or any of the surviving Beatles. All of the above have snagged their share of headlines and tabloid-TV spots, but few, if any, authentic figures have so often been done by Hollywood as Don King, boxing promoter extraordinaire and lightning rod for controversy. King, whose scheduled June 15 induction into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in Canastota, N.Y., has prompted one voter to resign in protest and rival promoter Bob Arum to vow he will not allow his name on future ballots, has seen almost as many interpretations of him on the screen as there are actors who have played fictional superspy James Bond.
REAL_ESTATE
January 12, 2003 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
A good first impression is key to a successful real estate deal. If a house were in desperate need of paint, would you give it a second look? If a neighborhood were dotted with rusting cars parked in the front yards, would you be eager to live there? Probably not. Say you're relocating to Philadelphia. You turn on the TV, and you watch, in succession, Hack, Rocky (the first one), Witness, Private Benjamin, The Philadelphia Story, and Blow Out. What kind of impression would you come away with?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Russell Crowe is discussing his body of work. And his body and his work. There's his right forefinger, gashed by a sword in Gladiator. "I've got the feeling back in it now," he says, raising the digit aloft. "But it took two years to come back. " There's a rib in his back that popped when he fell from a horse while making the 1991 Australian pic Hammers Over the Anvil. It still bothers him off and on, most recently in the pitching swells of the Pacific as he prowled the deck of a frigate called the Rose, a dead-on replica of a 19th-century Royal Navy vessel that Crowe captains in Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1989 | Marilyn Beck, the New York Daily News and the Associated Press contributed to this report
WHOOPEE! HE'S DANCING DEADLY Patrick ("Dirty Dancing") Swayze could be the sexiest ghost since Rex Harrison made Mrs. Muir's heart go pitter-patter. Swayze will star in Paramount's "Ghost," about a stranded spirit in New York City determined to communicate with the woman he loves, Demi Moore. He teams up with a psychic - Whoopi Goldberg - a charlatan who is amazed to learn her powers are authentic. DON'T CALL HER GRANNY Brigitte Bardot, animal lover and former sex-kitten, reportedly turned down an offer of $4 million to play a grandmother for a Gallic TV series based on "Three Men and a Baby.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In continuing defiance of those who claim the screen biography is dead, Richard Attenborough has forged much of his high reputation as a director from the lives of great men. He thrives on epic vistas, but it was reasonable to wonder whether even his big canvas was vast enough to do justice to the story of Charlie Chaplin. Faced with the challenge of Chaplin, a less ambitious filmmaker probably would have decided that less could be more and concentrated on one segment in a turbulent, fascinating and profoundly influential life that would stretch the capacity of a 10-part miniseries.
NEWS
September 4, 2000 | By Adrienne Harrison
Hollywood's most memorable couple: Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. Each is famous for prodigious acting talent. Together, they are famous for their enduring, unconventional romance and for the nine films they made together over 25 years, beginning with Woman of the Year in 1942. Hepburn and Tracy were a couple in real and reel life - their off-screen relationship as steadfast as their on-screen achievements were impressive. Most students of film agree they managed - unlike many other acting couples who also were couples in non-filmic life - to transfer their attraction and creative conflict to the screen.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
If you're astounded by Herman Cain's rise to the top of the Republican pyramid, remember that Americans have long had a soft spot for the mythological outsider who rides to the rescue. Movie director Frank Capra was great at mining that fantasy, most notably in 1939, when Jimmy Stewart used his aw-gosh gumption to clean up corruption in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington . And, far more recently in Dave , Kevin Kline played the amiable, innocent owner of a temp agency who accidentally becomes president, brings in his neurotic tax accountant to clean up the federal budget - and, presto, the world is a better place.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
WHEN Democratic National Committee members arrived in Philly this summer to scout the city's potential for the 2016 nominating convention, they were greeted by a Who's Who of local muckety-mucks including Mayor Nutter and former mayor and governor Ed Rendell. Among the business suits and power ties (and, OK, the Phillie Phanatic) was a middle-aged guy in a gray sweatshirt, well-worn fedora, leather jacket and fingerless gloves. His left eye - red and rimmed with small butterfly bandages - seemed to have suffered a recent trauma.
LIVING
January 7, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story includes information from the Associated Press, Reuters, the Washington Post, the Dallas Morning News, the New York Post, USA Today and Inquirer staff writer Steven Rea
Tyrone Ford, arrested and charged with stealing Marion Barry's car Monday, is a former musical prodigy who was given a National Youth Hero Award by President Ronald Reagan in 1986. Police said they found Ford, 19, behind the wheel of the former Washington mayor's 1991 Chrysler New Yorker. Police said Ford had a marijuana joint laced with cocaine in his pocket and tested positive for drug use. He was freed on his own recognizance. When he was 12, Ford led three church choirs in D.C. Associates say that in recent years he's been battling drug and other problems.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
WHEN Democratic National Committee members arrived in Philly this summer to scout the city's potential for the 2016 nominating convention, they were greeted by a Who's Who of local muckety-mucks including Mayor Nutter and former mayor and governor Ed Rendell. Among the business suits and power ties (and, OK, the Phillie Phanatic) was a middle-aged guy in a gray sweatshirt, well-worn fedora, leather jacket and fingerless gloves. His left eye - red and rimmed with small butterfly bandages - seemed to have suffered a recent trauma.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
If you're astounded by Herman Cain's rise to the top of the Republican pyramid, remember that Americans have long had a soft spot for the mythological outsider who rides to the rescue. Movie director Frank Capra was great at mining that fantasy, most notably in 1939, when Jimmy Stewart used his aw-gosh gumption to clean up corruption in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington . And, far more recently in Dave , Kevin Kline played the amiable, innocent owner of a temp agency who accidentally becomes president, brings in his neurotic tax accountant to clean up the federal budget - and, presto, the world is a better place.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Is there a quality that's quintessentially Philadelphian in Philadelphia movies? The question is occasioned by In Her Shoes, the film based on the novel by Philadelphia-based Jennifer Weiner. Starring Toni Collette as the Princeton-educated workaholic who has zero patience for her semiliterate playgirl sib (Cameron Diaz), the tale of sisterly love-hate in the City of Brotherly Love reverberates with the class conflict of such Phillyfilms as Kitty Foyle and Trading Places. Likewise, Shoes treads the path of such outsider-looking-in films as Rocky and The Sixth Sense.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Russell Crowe is discussing his body of work. And his body and his work. There's his right forefinger, gashed by a sword in Gladiator. "I've got the feeling back in it now," he says, raising the digit aloft. "But it took two years to come back. " There's a rib in his back that popped when he fell from a horse while making the 1991 Australian pic Hammers Over the Anvil. It still bothers him off and on, most recently in the pitching swells of the Pacific as he prowled the deck of a frigate called the Rose, a dead-on replica of a 19th-century Royal Navy vessel that Crowe captains in Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World.
REAL_ESTATE
January 12, 2003 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
A good first impression is key to a successful real estate deal. If a house were in desperate need of paint, would you give it a second look? If a neighborhood were dotted with rusting cars parked in the front yards, would you be eager to live there? Probably not. Say you're relocating to Philadelphia. You turn on the TV, and you watch, in succession, Hack, Rocky (the first one), Witness, Private Benjamin, The Philadelphia Story, and Blow Out. What kind of impression would you come away with?
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In last summer's hot-rod movie Gone in 60 Seconds, a retired car thief is forced to steal 50 rare cars in 24 hours. While Philadelphia police are not positive the muscle-car flick is behind a recent bump in auto theft in Tacony, Wissinoming and Mayfair, officers agree there is some evidence neighborhood teens are playing out the felonious role of the movie's star, Nicolas Cage. "There's some indications that there's a point system where there's some kind of game that's being played," said Capt.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
When "The Wedding Planner" opened in Los Angeles earlier this week, party planner to the stars Alyse Sobel watched with all the excitement of a first-time bride about to march down the aisle. Sobel, who coordinated the nuptials of such Hollywood stars as Blair Underwood and Marlee Matlin (not to each other), is the real-life wedding planner upon whom Jennifer Lopez's character is loosely based. The film is about a high-profile wedding planner who has all but given up on love until she meets a pediatrician played by Matthew McConaughey, whose wedding she is coordinating.
NEWS
September 4, 2000 | By Adrienne Harrison
Hollywood's most memorable couple: Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. Each is famous for prodigious acting talent. Together, they are famous for their enduring, unconventional romance and for the nine films they made together over 25 years, beginning with Woman of the Year in 1942. Hepburn and Tracy were a couple in real and reel life - their off-screen relationship as steadfast as their on-screen achievements were impressive. Most students of film agree they managed - unlike many other acting couples who also were couples in non-filmic life - to transfer their attraction and creative conflict to the screen.
NEWS
May 2, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
"DIARY OF A CITY PRIEST," a film by Eugene Martin, 8 o'clock tonight as part of "Fest Indies - Program One" and 5 p.m. Sunday. Both showings are at International House, 3701 Chestnut St. For more information on the film and the entire Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema, call 215-569-9700 or 800-969-7392. The real Father Mac is older, grayer, even more doubting and introspective than his cinema self. But the Rev. John P. McNamee is still there at St. Malachy's Church in North Philadelphia, still answering the door at midnight, bailing out the sinners, feeding the hungry and brokering scholarships for the hopeful.
NEWS
September 6, 1998 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Shawn Swords speaks, his eyes dart around the room as he takes in the scenery as if on guard duty. He is a serious-minded guy from West Chester, but there is a touch of frenzy about him when he speaks of his latest venture: a 90-minute film shot locally, in area bars, restaurants and private homes. He just completed the film, Love, Friendship and Hypocisy, which he financed with the help of friends and family. Swords, 36, wrote, directed and produced the film, which was shot in black and white.
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