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SPORTS
December 15, 2012 | INQUIRER STAFF REPORT
The Union selected Colorado Rapids forward Conor Casey in the second stage of the MLS reentry draft on Friday. Casey, 31, suffered an Achilles tendon tear in 2011 but played in 18 games last season for Colorado, scoring two goals and adding three assists. The 2010 MLS Cup MVP, he has 50 goals in seven MLS seasons and has made 20 appearances with the U.S. national team. "Conor makes us a better team," team manager John Hackworth said in a statement. "He has proven that he can be one of the best forwards in this league and for the national team.
SPORTS
December 16, 2010 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the off-season priorities for the Union was to change their goaltending, and that process is guaranteed after goalie Chris Seitz was one of two players selected in Stage 2 of Major League Soccer's reentry process. Seitz was selected by the Seattle Sounders FC with the ninth selection of the first round, while Union midfielder Fred was taken with the fourth pick in the second round by the New England Revolution. The players became available for the draft after the Union didn't pick up their contract options.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | By Crispin Sartwell
When the ancients looked into the night sky, they saw an uncorrupted and incorruptible world. But when they looked around them here on Earth, they saw degradation and imperfection. Our world and ourselves were in a continual state of decomposition. In the supercelestial realm, everything was permanent and therefore real. Their highest ambition was to bring us to that higher realm - perhaps at death - to help us find a truth and immortality that would transcend our hairy, mammalian, desire-ridden existence.
NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
What started with a retired Camden police corporal's counseling one at-risk youth in April has grown into a city-run prisoner reentry program that has put 14 formerly incarcerated men to work. The men, who were recruited by Camden's new Office of Prevention and Reentry, are working with the Camden Special Services District Clean Team, sweeping and raking city parks and its business corridors. One of the participants, Adrian Muse, 39, said the job keeps him busy and is a way to give back to his community.
NEWS
September 17, 2008
Mayor Nutter did not make a mistake in trying to give a former convict a job helping other former inmates find work. But he did make a mistake in putting someone ill-equipped for the role in charge of the program. The result will cost the city. Six months after being appointed director of the Mayor's Office for the Reentry of Ex-offenders, Ronald L. Cuie has been demoted. It had to be done. During his brief tenure, Cuie nearly doubled his staff from 16 to 29, seriously overspent his budget by about $156,000, and failed to pay bills that his office owed.
NEWS
April 19, 2008 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Malissa Gamble knew this audience: 40 ex-offenders about to graduate yesterday from a program designed to wean them back into society. Once, she was one of them. Over the last two weeks, those sitting in classroom rows inside the Mayor's Office of Reentry in Southwest Philadelphia received services that included job training, GED classes, drug counseling, family reunification and pep talks. They will leave the program with a resume, a graduation letter, and a letter of recommendation.
NEWS
September 15, 2008 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter has made a priority of trying to persuade Philadelphia's business leaders to hire ex-convicts as part of his plan to make the city safer. Now, having done so himself, the mayor has discovered there can be pitfalls. Six months after appointing an ex-inmate and former drug addict with a record for aggravated assault to lead a city office devoted to finding jobs for other ex-offenders, Nutter quietly demoted him. During his brief tenure as director of the Mayor's Office for the Reentry of Ex-offenders, Ronald L. Cuie nearly doubled his staff and overspent his budget to the point where the city has had to cancel a contract with a firm hired to find jobs for ex-inmates.
NEWS
November 15, 2007 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 250 applicants turned out yesterday at a job fair in which the one trait the job-seekers have in common is typically the last thing they would put on their resumes: All of them have criminal histories. About 30 employers, including grocers, auto-repair shops, the Philadelphia Police Department, and the U.S. Army, attended the city-sponsored fair at the Kingsessing Recreation Center aimed specifically at ex-offenders. "We're here because we believe that people do need a second chance," said Lashawna Reddy, the human-resources coordinator at the ShopRite on Island Avenue.
NEWS
February 19, 2009 | By Marcia Gelbart and Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
If enacted, it'll be an admission fee like no other. Seeking ways to raise revenue, Philadelphia Prisons Commissioner Louis Giorla floated a proposal yesterday to charge criminals money to get in to city jails. That was enough to stump city Managing Director Camille Barnett. "Does anyone actually charge admission to get into jail?" asked Barnett, who listened to Giorla's proposal during a nearly three-hour public budget meeting focusing on spending by the Prisons, Police and Fire Departments.
NEWS
November 15, 2007 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 250 applicants turned out yesterday at a job fair in which the one trait the job-seekers have in common is typically the last thing they would put on their resumes: All of them have criminal histories. About 30 employers, including grocers, auto-repair shops, the Philadelphia Police Department, and the U.S. Army, attended the city-sponsored fair at the Kingsessing Recreation Center aimed specifically at ex-offenders. "We're here because we believe that people do need a second chance," said Lashawna Reddy, the human-resources coordinator at the ShopRite on Island Avenue.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2015 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Honestly, when Troy Johnson signed on for a horticulture-training program offered at the Philadelphia prison where he was incarcerated, he wasn't interested in growing much of anything. He just wanted to cut down his time for committing conspiracy to commit robbery and take advantage of Roots to Re-Entry's promise of early parole. But over the weeks, as Johnson worked the soil, learned skills, and watched over a garden, you could say a seed was planted. "I started liking it and really wanted to take up the offer of coming home to a job," he says.
SPORTS
December 15, 2012 | INQUIRER STAFF REPORT
The Union selected Colorado Rapids forward Conor Casey in the second stage of the MLS reentry draft on Friday. Casey, 31, suffered an Achilles tendon tear in 2011 but played in 18 games last season for Colorado, scoring two goals and adding three assists. The 2010 MLS Cup MVP, he has 50 goals in seven MLS seasons and has made 20 appearances with the U.S. national team. "Conor makes us a better team," team manager John Hackworth said in a statement. "He has proven that he can be one of the best forwards in this league and for the national team.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
Dubbed a "medical anomaly" by his doctors, 21-year-old Alexander Rotzal has fought the odds of survival from the moment he was born. His severely underdeveloped heart, an often fatal birth defect, has had him in and out of hospitals for his entire life. At age 2, Alex had a life-prolonging heart operation. Every few years, to keep his heart functioning normally, he still needed an extra metal part here and there, including a pacemaker. This summer, while other college students worked on their tans or vacationed abroad, Alex battled cancer and beat it back.
SPORTS
December 1, 2011 | By KERITH GABRIEL, gabrielk@phillynews.com
PERHAPS A BIT harsh for those involved to admit, but see Major League Soccer's upcoming re-entry draft as fall cleaning for the seller - and a garage sale for the buyer. Sometimes you find a gem in the process, but mostly you're just buying someone else's unwanted clutter. Yesterday, MLS released its master list ahead of Monday's first stage of the two-tiered draft that happens via teleconference with collective technical staff members among the league's 19 franchises. The second and final stage is set for Dec. 12. How the draft works, essentially, is that clubs can draft players off the list but must exercise the option or extend what's called a "bona fide offer" to the selected player.
NEWS
November 29, 2011 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie said Monday that he wants to divert nonviolent drug offenders from prison and into rehabilitative programs, a move expected to save money and help lower the recidivism rate. During a visit to Camden, the governor signed an executive order to expand the state's drug-court program and to create a task force to centralize the state's prisoner-reentry efforts and determine what barriers exist for inmates upon release. The governor also wants to create a recidivism database that tracks the success of reentry programs.
NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
What started with a retired Camden police corporal's counseling one at-risk youth in April has grown into a city-run prisoner reentry program that has put 14 formerly incarcerated men to work. The men, who were recruited by Camden's new Office of Prevention and Reentry, are working with the Camden Special Services District Clean Team, sweeping and raking city parks and its business corridors. One of the participants, Adrian Muse, 39, said the job keeps him busy and is a way to give back to his community.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wherever Camden Mayor Dana L. Redd went, there was Cpl. Rhoda Thomas, in a loose-fitting suit and blouse, quietly blending in at City Council meetings or standing in the back at news conferences. The lipstick and earrings may have fooled a few. But Thomas, Camden's first African American female police officer, had tangled with some of the city's toughest drug dealers in her 25 years on the force. She could take down anyone who posed a threat to the mayor. Thomas, 54, retired from the force on March 31 after more than a year on the mayor's security detail.
NEWS
February 11, 2011
PROTESTERS of re-entry programs need to stop following someone else's political agenda. The protesters remind me of the crowd that didn't want black people in Southwest Philadelphia in the '60s and '70s. What we have here is another form of discrimination, and these protesters should be sued. Discrimination by any other name is still discrimination. Where are ex-offenders to go if they can't go home? Not only must Philadelphia gain control of the crime issue, it must also gain control of the education and employment issue.
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By Jeff Shields, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's vision for handling its nonviolent offenders on Wednesday ran smack into Southwest Philadelphia residents who don't want prisoners in their backyard. Neighbors of the vacant M.A.B. paint factory at 5213 Grays Ave. shut down both Grays and Lindbergh Boulevard for an hour during rush hour as a protest against a proposed prisoner-reentry facility. For the last year, the Zoning Board of Adjustment has been considering a variance that would permit a father-and-son development team, Ronald and David Watts, to build the Vision-Nary Community Reentry Center (VCRC)
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