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Refinery

NEWS
September 29, 1987 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
Westville council members want the state to investigate the Coastal Corp. refinery, which officials suspect is the source of noxious fumes or soot that has permeated the borough three times this month. Council members last night denounced the state Department of Environmental Protection's handling of the three episodes and called for the agency's immediate attention to the problems. They said the DEP was unreceptive to their calls for information and help after each of the occurences.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Resources said yesterday that a Sun Co. refinery was responsible for causing a foul odor that sickened students and teachers at a Delaware County elementary school in February. DER spokesman Jason Gaertner said the agency had decided it would cite the Radnor-based firm for causing a strong, kerosene-like odor that swept over the Linwood Elementary School early Feb. 13. Sun operates a large refinery within a block of the small brick elementary school in Linwood, Lower Chichester.
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunoco Inc.'s Philadelphia refinery, which was threatened with closure at the end of this month, will be reborn as an "energy hub. " The Carlyle Group, a Washington private-equity manager, announced plans Monday to operate the refinery with Sunoco as a joint venture called Philadelphia Energy Solutions. The venture will save 850 jobs at the refinery, the largest fuel-production plant in the northeastern United States, and may employ hundreds more if plans to expand production are realized.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The petroleum trapped in the ground under Philadelphia's refinery area is like a storage tank without walls - a dramatic reminder that the groundwater under the city is shot to hell. Vast natural reservoirs under South Philadelphia have already been lost to pollution for future generations. But environmental regulators say something must be done about the refinery-area ooze. For one thing, fumes released by an excavation might blow up. The ooze under the Sun Co. refinery has been measured in spots at 8- to 10-feet thick.
NEWS
March 18, 2005 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Delaware refinery owner Motiva Enterprises agreed to pay a $10 million criminal fine yesterday for negligence and environmental damage from a 2001 explosion that killed a Bucks County man and spilled more than a million gallons of acid and petroleum products into the Delaware River. The fine was the largest criminal environmental fine in Delaware history, said Thomas L. Sansonetti, assistant attorney general in the U.S. Department of Justice, which filed the lawsuit with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | Staff Report
That odor noticed by many residents of Gloucester County in South Jersey and Delaware County in Pennsylvania turned out to be a large oil leak. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection said last night that 157,000 barrels of crude oil spilled from a tank at the Paulsboro Refining Company in Gloucester County. But the oil, amounting to 6.6 million gallons, leaked into an emergency containment area, which had the capacity to hold much more. As a result, there was not an immediate threat to the Delaware River, or local water supplies.
NEWS
July 11, 2007 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A lightning strike at a South Jersey refinery this afternoon sparked a spectacular fire that blazed for hours, giving off flames and thick plumes of black smoke that could be seen for miles. The four-alarm fire broke out about 4:30 p.m., as a line of storms ahead of a cold front was passing through the region. Lightning struck a storage tank at Sunoco Inc.'s Eagle Point Refinery along the Delaware River, directly across from South Philadelphia's Naval Business Center. Flames licked the sky near the intersection of Interstate 295 and Route 130 in Westville, Gloucester County, for more than 31/2 hours before the fire was extinguished about 8 p.m., after emergency crews had smothered it with firefighting foam.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1986 | By BOB EISBERG, Daily News Staff Writer
A fine layer of cement now coats the floor of what once was the raw-sugar storage shed for the Amstar refinery in South Philadelphia. This year, perhaps 150,000 tons of imported cement will pass through the facility. And if the Spanish and Norwegian partnership that now owns the property realizes its dreams, eventually such commodities as fertilizer, salt and gypsum will be moving across the 20 acres at the foot of Dickinson Street. Nobody has any expectations that the site, which now bears a small sign reading Norval Cement Terminal, ever will have the vitality of the Amstar refinery, where 550 people worked at the time of the shutdown four years ago. Only 15 or so work there now. But Bill Roberts, president of Cemstar, the venture that was formed to buy the property last summer, said the site can fill a niche.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania and Delaware lawmakers on Tuesday asked for a federal analysis of the impact of closing three Philadelphia area refineries, which account for 31 percent of the East Coast's refining capacity. The legislators asked the U.S. Energy Information Administration to assess the economic impact of the closures, including the regional effect on prices and supply of motor fuels, heating oil, and chemical products. In September, Sunoco Inc. and ConocoPhillips announced their Philadelphia, Marcus Hook, and Trainer facilities would be sold or closed.
NEWS
February 16, 1988 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Negotiators met yesterday for the first time since the start of the 13-day- old strike at the British Petroleum Co. refinery in Marcus Hook, but neither side was optimistic about reaching an early agreement on a new two- year contract. Although plant managers and members of the bargaining committee of Local 8-234 of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers Union were present for six hours in a Delaware County hotel, the opposing sides came together around the bargaining table for a total of only about 45 minutes, according to union president Wayne Slivenski.
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