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BUSINESS
April 12, 2002 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sunoco Inc. said yesterday that it expected to report a first-quarter loss of $105 million because of rising crude-oil prices and weak demand for heating oil and other refined products. Margins for refining crude oil and for marketing gasoline were at their lowest levels in years, the Philadelphia company said in a news release. Petrochemical margins, though improved, also remained low. "The first quarter was a horror show," said Andrew Fairbanks, a Merrill Lynch & Co. Inc. analyst.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2007 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like motorists, Sunoco Inc. worries when crude prices soar, as they have in 2007. The Philadelphia company, which dates to the 19th century, long ago sold its oil exploration and production businesses. So it pays for the crude delivered to its refineries, by ship or pipeline, and feels financial pain when there's a lag between a rise in crude and the market price at the pump. "It has been perhaps one of the most volatile years I've seen," said John G. Drosdick, 64, Sunoco's chief executive and chairman since 2000.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2003 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sunoco Inc. posted an eightfold increase in its second-quarter profit yesterday, driven by a sharp rebound in refining earnings from its refineries in Philadelphia and Marcus Hook. The Philadelphia refiner and marketer of petroleum products said it earned $1.04 per share, compared with 12 cents per share in the same period last year. But the results were toward the low end of analysts' expectations, which ranged from 95 cents per share to $1.27 cents per share, according to Bloomberg News.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2001 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sunoco Inc. reported yesterday that its operating profits for 2000 were $438 million, more than eight times the $51 million it earned the year before. Gasoline refining margins in the Northeast reached their highest level in a decade, driving the Philadelphia petroleum refining and marketing company to its best results since the mid-1980s, the company said. Sunoco's full-year earnings per share of $5.01, excluding special gains and charges, easily beat analysts' expectations of $4.61 per share.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2005 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sunoco Inc. yesterday reported a record first-quarter profit of $116 million, but the company remained cautious about the industry outlook. "I'm not a golden-age guy," said John G. Drosdick, Sunoco's chairman and chief executive officer, referring to the belief by some industry colleagues that oil refining has entered an era of high profitability. Drosdick's remark came during a meeting with reporters yesterday after the Philadelphia company's annual shareholders' meeting at the Moore College of Art and Design in Center City.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sunoco Inc.'s refineries ran all-out at the end of last year, more than doubling their profit in the fourth quarter, which has seen record results for the oil industry. The Philadelphia company said yesterday after the stock market closed that its five refineries earned $286 million in the quarter, up from $135 million a year earlier, as tight refining capacity nationwide drove up Sunoco's average wholesale profit per barrel by 55 percent. Sunoco's overall net income was $287 million, or $2.12 a share, as the company's much smaller retail gasoline and chemical operations failed to keep pace.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sunoco Inc. announced a $61 million project yesterday to make a key processing unit at its South Philadelphia refinery safer, a move long sought by community activists and environmentalists. Once it gets the required environmental permits, the Philadelphia refiner plans to install a system that reduces the volatility of an extremely hazardous acid used to produce cleaner-burning, high-octane ingredients for gasoline. Joanne Rossi, president of the Community/Labor Refinery Tracking Committee, which has been pushing since 1991 for a switch to a safer process at the refinery, was thrilled by Sunoco's plans.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sunoco Inc., the largest oil refiner in the Northeast, reported a 76 percent jump in second-quarter net income as the nation's lack of excess refining capacity, coupled with strong demand, kept profit margins high. The Philadelphia company, which operates three refineries in the region, said yesterday that its profit was a record $426 million, or $3.22 a share, compared with $242 million, or $1.75 a share, in the same period a year earlier. Sales of gasoline, diesel fuel, chemicals, and other petroleum products reached $10.59 billion in the quarter, up 33 percent from $7.99 billion a year earlier.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1999 | By Wendy Tanaka, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert H. Campbell, who steered Sunoco Inc. through two major restructurings during the '90s, will retire as chairman and chief executive officer of the Philadelphia oil refiner in June, the company announced yesterday. During his nine-year tenure as CEO, Campbell took Sunoco out of the oil-exploration business and refocused the company as a gasoline retailer and chemical and coal-products manufacturer. "This whole decade has been a matter of changing from an integrated business to focusing on our core businesses - refining, marketing, lubricants and coke," said Campbell, 62, who began his career at Sunoco as a research engineer in 1960.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1989 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sun Co.'s earnings rose sharply in the first quarter, lifted by better results from the U.S. refining and marketing business. Suncor, the company's Canadian petroleum subsidiary, also showed improved results for the quarter, helping to offset a poor showing by Radnor Corp., Sun's real estate development subsidiary. Sun Co. owns 75 percent of Suncor. Profits from refining and marketing increased by $27 million from the first quarter last year. Sun Co. attributed the increase to greater margins between its cost of crude oil and the price it gets for refined products, such as gasoline and heating oil. Robert McClements Jr., chairman and chief executive officer of the Radnor oil company, said Sun's refining margins began to widen in the second half of 1987 and that the trend was continuing.
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NEWS
September 18, 2016 | By Al Haas, Staff Writer
As we stroll down the automotive midway, we encounter a particularly enticing tent. We are drawn inside by the magnetism of curiosity. After all, who could resist experiencing The Incredible Shrinking GMC Acadia? For years, the Acadia has been part of a triumvirate of General Motors full-size crossover SUVs built on the trusty Lambda platform. The others, the Chevy Traverse and Buick Enclave, will remain as full-sizers. But while the Acadia will continue to be offered in its full-size, eight-passenger form until early next year, there is also a brand-new, midsize version for 2017 that is a whopping 740 pounds lighter, more economical, more agile, and more refined.
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
PBF Logistics L.P. announced Tuesday that it will acquire four refined-product terminals in the Philadelphia area from Plains All American Pipeline L.P. of Houston for $100 million. PBF Logistics is affiliated with PBF Energy, of Parsippany, N.J., which owns the oil refineries in Paulsboro and Delaware City, Del. The assets include a total of 57 tanks with a total capacity of 4.2 million barrels, pipeline connections, 26 truck-loading lanes, and marine facilities capable of handling barges and ships.
NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - The summertime campus here is annually overrun with pianists (and a few violinists) when the Golandsky Institute welcomes artists young and old to learn healthy techniques that allow them to play well for as long as they love music. There's also a piano festival (ending Saturday) showcasing faculty and students expressing themselves without extraneous effort. The exception of sorts was a Thursday recital at Taplin Auditorium of Chinese pianist Wei Luo, the latest Chinese wonder to hit the Curtis Institute.
SPORTS
February 4, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It's back to the negotiating table for the NFL and thousands of its former players suing the league over concussion-related health problems. U.S. District Judge Anita Brody, who is overseeing settlement efforts on behalf of the league's more than 20,000 potentially eligible retirees, has asked for further revisions to a deal that could pay out as much as $1 billion over 65 years. The move came seven months after she granted preliminary approval to the plan. In an order filed Monday, Brody ordered both sides to attempt to amend their settlement proposal to widen eligibility for some former players and their families.
FOOD
November 21, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Townsend "Tod" Wentz was growing up in Palmyra, Burlington County, his family's Thanksgiving table varied depending on who was cooking dinner. When his German-English relatives hosted, the holiday meant turkey, gravy, green beans, and stuffing. But when his Polish grandmother was in charge, it was a feast of ham, stuffed cabbage, and coleslaw. Now that Wentz is the one doing the cooking, he does the only logical thing: He makes all of the above. Only he refines the dishes with the classical French techniques that have become the hallmark of his six-month-old restaurant, Townsend, on East Passyunk Avenue's booming restaurant corridor.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With rockabilly bigger throughout the British Isles than in its place of origin - the American South - it makes some sense that one of its tastiest practitioners is from Dublin: Irish singer-composer Imelda May. But with a crack band and a powerful, nuanced voice that is equal parts Wanda Jackson and Eartha Kitt, May is no purist copycat. During Tuesday's sold-out Union Transfer gig, May showed she's taking rockabilly to the next level, retaining its traditions and inspirations, and making new fans.
SPORTS
June 13, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
REGARDING the Eagles competition at kicker, the telling days won't come until training camp and the four preseason games. As coach Chip Kelly said of the kickers before Monday's organized team activity, "A lot of times right now it's like they are going out on the driving range and hitting balls. " But while it's tough now to gauge performance without live action, the right leg of Alex Henery will surely garner its share of attention between the end of OTAs this week and the Sept.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
It's been hit or miss at Drexel University's Leonard Pearlstein Gallery over the last few years, the former being the terrific and terrifying Wangechi Mutu solo show inaugurating the gallery's new space a little over a year ago, the latter being sprawling international shows that should have been more tightly edited and group shows of local artists whose works were too much alike, having the unfortunate effect of making everyone look generic. The diversity of materials and processes used by the four local artists who make up the gallery's latest exhibition, "Raw to Refined: String, Tape, Sponges, and Vinyl" is a welcome change, though seasoned gallerygoers will note the show's somewhat tired premise, hard to ignore in an age when literally every material we know has sneaked its way into art, and quite often elegantly so. Three of the show's artists bring new meaning to refined . Nami Yamamato's two meticulously tatted filet lace "drawings" in red twine, displayed in delicate freestanding wood frames in the front of the gallery, reconstruct her observations of a redwood grove in coastal California (previously installed within that forest, they "caught" fog as it passed through them)
SPORTS
October 28, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's a sweltering summer evening in New York. A man with his leg in a cast is asleep in his wheelchair, oblivious to the din outside. He awakens to find a young woman, blond, with bright blue eyes, standing over him, red lipstick, a string of pearls around her neck, in the most elegant of black and white gowns. She plants a kiss on his lips. Is she a dream? An apparition? No, simply Grace Kelly, making her entrance in Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window , asking James Stewart - as the hobbled photojournalist soon to believe he has witnessed a murder - how his leg is ("Hurts a little")
SPORTS
August 10, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Deion Barnes began last season in a struggle to learn his responsibilities as a Penn State defensive end. When first seeing action in a game, "I had no idea what I was going to do at all," he recalled Thursday. But the Philadelphia native learned quickly, and combined with his physical strength and athletic ability, he was named Big Ten freshman of the year. Being recognized as the best in a conference full of talented freshmen should have touched off a lengthy celebration, but Barnes didn't spend much time rejoicing.
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