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Refugee Camp

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NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - Military aircraft from Sudan crossed the new international border with South Sudan and dropped bombs Thursday in and around a camp filled with refugees, officials said. A government official initially reported deaths, but an American activist who spoke to aid workers at the camp later said there were no casualties. There was no immediate comment from the Sudanese government in Khartoum on Thursday, as deadly fighting broke out in the Sudanese state of South Kordofan between the military and forces loyal to South Sudan, according to official Sudanese media.
NEWS
November 24, 2012 | By Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT - A bomb blast in a Palestinian refugee camp in Damascus killed four people and seriously wounded a member of a faction that has backed Syrian President Bashar Assad in the country's bitter civil war, activists said Friday. Syria's foreign ministry, meanwhile, lashed out at Turkey, which has sheltered anti-Assad fighters. The ministry denounced Turkey's request for NATO Patriot surface-to-air missiles along its border with Syria as "a new provocative step. " Turkey made the request this week to bolster its defenses and prevent a spillover of the Syrian civil war onto its territory.
NEWS
May 1, 1999 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
The friendly smiles, neat tents and quiet lines of people betrayed the personal stories of despair and terror throughout the camp. Frank Donaghue, CEO of the Southeastern Pennsylvania chapter of the Red Cross, saw a surprising level of order and placidness during a brief visit Thursday to the Brazda refugee camp in Blace, Macedonia. But the horrible reality of the war was not lost on Donaghue. Grasping a photo he took of a young woman cradling her newborn son inside a makeshift hospital tent, Donaghue said he was emotionally overwhelmed by the environment in which these babies were beginning their lives.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Dale Gavlak, Associated Press
ZAATARI, Jordan - A winter storm is magnifying the misery for tens of thousands of Syrians fleeing the country's civil war, turning a refugee camp into a muddy swamp where howling winds tore down tents and exposed the displaced residents to freezing temperatures. Some frustrated refugees at a camp in Zaatari, where about 50,000 are sheltered, attacked aid workers with sticks and stones after the tents collapsed in 35-m.p.h. winds, said Ghazi Sarhan, spokesman for the Jordanian charity that helps run the camp.
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The village, once filled with rollicking children on swing sets and adults somberly watching over them, is quiet. The barracks are nearly empty, and the cigarette butts littering the worn grass are the only evidence that thousands lived here. This modern-day Ellis Island for more than 4,000 Kosovar refugees who sought safety from the conflict in the Balkans at Burlington County's sprawling Army compound is about to close its operation. As of this morning, only 240 of the refugees remain because of glitches in relocation assignments or in providing continuing medical care for them.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Israel expelled four Palestinian activists to Lebanon today as rioters in the occupied Gaza Strip clashed with troops during a visit by a U.N. special envoy to a refugee camp. In the occupied West Bank, residents of the Kalandia refugee camp said troops shot and killed another Palestinian, raising the death toll to 33 since unrest erupted five weeks ago in the occupied territories. Israel, criticized by the United Nations for its handling of the violence and its plans to expel nine Palestinians accused of incitement, deported four of them to the edge of its self-declared southern Lebanon security zone, security sources said.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Israeli tanks and troops stormed into a Gaza Strip refugee camp late yesterday and waged a fierce gunbattle that killed at least 17 Palestinians, overshadowing Israel's decison to end Yasser Arafat's confinement. The raid, which raged past midnight, was one of several major Israeli army operations that left 23 Palestinians dead in a day of fighting that came as Prime Minister Ariel Sharon announced Israel would no longer confine Arafat at his West Bank town headquarters in Ramallah.
NEWS
April 13, 2003 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One year ago last week, Palestinian and Israeli lives were crushed, a neighborhood fell to a bulldozer's blade, and Jenin, the northernmost city on the West Bank, entered the lexicon of bitter conflict and became a rallying cry for both sides. Looking back on 12 turbulent months, Palestinians who lost homes in the refugee camp, and Israelis widowed when their husbands died fighting as soldiers, say time heals - but not every wound. The 10-day pitched battle inside the Jenin refugee camp was a watershed of the intifadah.
NEWS
February 2, 2003 | By Carolyn Davis
Deputy Editorial Page Editor The drums of war seem to be sounding ever louder from the White House. And if disarming Saddam Hussein should come to that, we soon may hear the sound of footsteps as Iraqi civilians flee fighting. Such humanitarian crises accompany wars - even the most just ones. For six months in 1999, I was the manager of a refugee camp for ethnic Albanian Kosovars in Macedonia, in the Balkans. When I arrived, the fighting already had stopped. But refugees cannot be forced back.
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NEWS
May 27, 2015 | By Yuge Xiao, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their classmates may be at the pool or on the beach this summer, but seven Hill School students plan to be in Turkey, volunteering at a Syrian refugee camp. The students, all girls, will travel as part of the Give A Hand program, started last year by Hülya Kösematoglu, a sophomore at the Pottstown boarding school. In addition to helping the refugees, the goal of the girls is to learn about local life and Turkish culture. Kösematoglu, who moved to the United States two years ago from Istanbul, said she realized the Western world has a drastically different view of her home.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
ZAATARI CAMP, Jordan - When 13-year-old Majid fled with his family from southern Syria in 2013 to escape shelling by government forces, he left everything behind, including his dreams. Looking older than his 15 years, his face perspiring under dark stubble, a dirty green sweatshirt hanging loosely on his rangy frame, Majid spoke to me in his new home, a small, bare trailer in the Zaatari refugee camp near Mafraq, Jordan - now the second-largest refugee camp anywhere. Sitting on one of several floor mats, the only furniture in the trailer, he had just returned from a workday spent chopping stones to make gravel that could be used in concrete.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
SOM MAYA TAMANG and her husband, Mongal Singh Tamang, fled their small cattle farm on the hillsides of Bhutan, a landlocked country in South Asia, with their young children clinging to their sides. After hearing of other ethnic Nepalis being murdered, beaten and abused by government forces, they feared that the army or police would come knocking on their door, too. It was 1992. The couple, then in their 30s, walked five days on foot westward from Bhutan to India with their six children, the oldest of whom was 12. In India, they boarded a truck for a night's journey to Nepal.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
On May 6, 2010, a 15-year-old boy named Oriel died of diphtheria in Haiti. Normally, the world would not have noticed. But the boy was living in a refugee camp managed by the actor Sean Penn. With the listless teenager in his sinewy arms, Penn had spent hours, rushing from hospital to hospital in the capital of Port-au-Prince, searching for the antitoxin that would save Oriel's life. It was found too late. Shortly after the boy was taken off life support, Penn appeared on CNN, expressing outrage about the many factors that led to his death.
NEWS
May 10, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even after spending most of his life in a refugee camp, Frank Mulbah says he wants to go home. Not to the Liberia he fled as a child. But the one he sees in his imagination. Mulbah's vision is of a flourishing West African nation transformed from its civil-war past. Now a U.S. citizen, Mulbah, 28, will graduate from Cheyney University on Saturday. The political science major - who didn't set foot inside a school until he was 15 - will walk down the aisle to receive his bachelor's degree and toward an eventual future in Africa.
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
TILLING THE SOIL at a new community garden for Bhutanese refugees in Northeast Philadelphia yesterday, Meena Dhimal smiled as she raked the land. She said she would grow hot chile peppers and potatoes. Dhimal, 27, and several other Bhutanese refugees of Nepali descent broke ground yesterday at a new community garden - a project of HIAS (Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) Pennsylvania - on the property of All Saints Episcopal Church, at Loney and Frontenac streets in Rhawnhurst. "This is really an opportunity for them to bring their home culture to their new lives here in Philadelphia" said Sarah Amazeen, director of refugee programming and planning at HIAS, one of Philadelphia's three refugee-resettlement agencies.
NEWS
February 11, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Blending 19th-century settlement house values with the healing power of art, a South Philadelphia storefront is the busy hub where trauma meets recovery for two of the city's fastest-growing immigrant groups: Burmese and Bhutanese refugees. For Poonam Ghimire, 17, who was born in a refugee camp after her family fled a government crackdown on the Nepalese in Bhutan, the storefront called "Southeast by Southeast" (SExSE) is a place to demonstrate her culture's native dance moves alongside an African American break-dance crew.
NEWS
October 21, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Born in a refugee camp in Thailand, Kyaw Kyaw did his homework in a candlelit hut. Books were shared. Paper was precious, too. There are no candles but plenty of books, paper, and power at the Oaklyn Public School, where 11-year-old Kyaw Kyaw (sounds like cha cha ) is thriving in sixth grade. "He's better here," says his uncle, Kai Zu, who, like Kyaw, left a refugee camp for the United States in 2009 and lives in a borough apartment. "It's wonderful. " Twenty-two students whose families fled Burma, the troubled Southeast Asian nation also known as Myanmar, are enrolled at Oaklyn's sole school, a weathered but well-kept structure built on Kendall Boulevard in 1926.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Anne Gearan, Washington Post
ZAATARI CAMP, Jordan - Secretary of State John Kerry got a firsthand view of the grinding war in Syria on Thursday, visiting a sprawling refugee camp that houses 115,000 Syrians who have fled the fighting and hearing bitter complaints that the world has forgotten them. Kerry met with six Syrian refugees who angrily asked why world powers have not set up a no-fly zone or protective humanitarian zone inside Syria, something the Obama administration has considered but decided against for now. "They are frustrated and angry at the world," Kerry said afterward.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
Bomb kills 13 at refugee camp PESHAWAR, Pakistan - A car packed with explosives blew up inside a refugee camp on Thursday, killing 13 people in an attack that underscored the intensity of the conflict between the government and militants in northwestern Pakistan where refugees are sometimes caught in the middle of the fighting. The Taliban has been waging a bloody insurgency against the government in an attempt to establish an Islamic state and end Pakistan's cooperation with the United States.
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