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NEWS
November 21, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students, their families and teachers in Radnor Township, to bring the city and suburbs closer together, will hold a Thanksgiving Day dinner tonight for more than 50 refugees living in West Philadelphia. The holiday dinner will be held in the high school cafeteria for people from Angola, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Hungary and Vietnam. The school district will provide a bus to transport the refugees. "This will be the first Thanksgiving for some of the refugees," said Lois Wysocki, a teacher and an organizer of the dinner.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The fate of hundreds of Kampuchean refugees who fled a camp controlled by communist Khmer Rouge guerrillas remained in doubt yesterday. The Thai military said that the 600 refugees would be taken from a camp run by the non-communist Khmer People's National Liberation Front and returned to the Khmer Rouge. But U.S. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said the Thai government had confirmed to U.S. officials that the refugees would be allowed to remain in non-communist resistance camps.
NEWS
July 2, 1986 | By Leah Leatherbee
Tomorrow, a four-day celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty will begin. A mile away 250 illegal immigrants will languish in the Varick Street detention facility. Throughout the country about 5,000 illegal immigrants, in addition to another 2,000 Cubans, will be imprisoned in detention centers and penitentiaries throughout the United States. A large proportion of these people are political asylum applicants who have fled repressive regimes in Haiti, Cuba, Iran, Afghanistan, El Salvador, Poland, Guatemala, South African, Ethiopia and elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The trucks with forlorn passengers huddled in back lumber through the darkness to the ominous camp. When they arrive, loudspeakers above the fences blare orders in strident German. It is a scene made familiar by films devoted to the Holocaust, and the knowledge of the fate that awaits the prisoners when they reached the camp always makes it profoundly moving. But in Silver City we are dealing with survivors who somehow managed to endure the unspeakable and live to become refugees.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | By Jerry Byrd and Tonya Fox, Special to the Inquirer
In 1945, Elena Santora, her brother and parents, refugees from the civil war in Spain, reached Texas. Their flight had taken them through France, Venezuela, Mexico and, finally, to New York, where Elena, then 13, looked about in bewilderment. "It was a whole new culture, new ways," Santora said last week. "My most vivid recollection was starting school without being able to communicate. There were no ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) classes back then. " Today, Santora, of Drexel Hill, uses her experiences as an immigrant to help new waves of refugees fleeing other bloody civil wars.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The patient wanderer looking for shelter hopes that if the door slams in her face, perhaps a window will open. Such was the case in 1938 when Jews eager to escape the Nazi threat in Europe found virtually all the world's ports closed to them after the Evian Conference. There, the United States joined Britain, Canada and dozens of other democracies in refusing to amend immigration laws to accommodate political refugees. While there was no available safe harbor in the West, one remained open in Shanghai, the Chinese port city where an estimated 20,000 refugees of sufficient means booked passage on the eve of Japanese occupation.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
About 10 men and women sat in lawn chairs on the grass outside their homes near Phoenixville recently, talking and joking among themselves. They smiled and waved as a car slowly passed. Behind them, clothes lay draped over a line hanging between two buildings. Children played nearby, chasing each other on rusty, single-speed bicycles. It could have been a scene from any neighborhood. But this neighborhood was the Valley Forge Christian College, the language was Ukrainian and the neighbors were refugees who have found a temporary home at the college.
NEWS
December 25, 1988 | By Elisabeth Ryan Sullivan, Special to The Inquirer
"Christmas cookies!" Helena Sedinova said with a burst of laughter, showing off her expanding English vocabulary - in a heavy Czech accent. Her crescent-shaped goodies coated with powdered sugar were piled high in a ceramic bowl, awaiting nibblers. Her handmade silvery angels and feathery birds twirled from the branches of a 7-foot tree near the foyer. A simple wreath hung above the fireplace in the brick, ranch-style home in Mount Laurel. For weeks, the 34-year-old Czech refugee has baked and crafted and planned for today.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | By Carol Rosenberg, Inquirer Gulf Staff
Thousands of war refugees are trapped on the Iraqi side of the Iraqi- Jordanian border as Iraqi border guards refuse them permission to leave, relief officials reported yesterday. With temperatures plunging - this weekend, it snowed here - many of the refugees are living in their cars. Others are huddled in tents against frigid desert winds, the officials said. Members of a French relief group, Doctors without Borders, are waiting on the Jordanian side of the border with 17,000 blankets, hopeful that refugees would soon be allowed to leave Iraq.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 6, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When July Fourth rolls around, I always think of my grandparents, who emigrated to the "land of the free" from Russia, which undoubtedly saved their lives and enabled mine. Needless to say, I believe immigrants are a source of America's strength. But this year, when musing on immigration, my thoughts turn to the record numbers of desperate migrants trying to cross the Mediterranean in flimsy boats organized by Libyan smugglers. More than 137,000 refugees crossed from January to June, landing in Greece, Italy, Malta, and Spain, an 83 percent increase from the same period in 2014.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
FORT INDIANTOWN GAP, Pa. - The band rocked "Bad Moon Rising. " Party guests signed a banner, adding memories of 1975 with colored markers. A projector flashed slides of how everyone looked back then. But this was no ordinary 40th reunion. On Saturday, 40 years after the mass exodus of South Vietnamese when Saigon fell to communist forces on April 30, 1975, about 200 former refugees - U.S. citizens now - reunited for the first time at this Lebanon County Army post that was their first home in America on a journey of assimilation.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doris Polsky, a precocious mathematician who helped integrate Mt. Airy, died in her home Wednesday at Cresheimbrook Condominium. She was 90. Along with her twin sister, she was recruited out of the Philadelphia High School for Girls to work on U.S. Army research ballistics during World War II. Together, they also helped found the Allens Lane Art Center and West Mt. Airy Neighbors. As owners of Twin Realty they helped staunch white flight in Northwest Philadelphia during the 1960s, and thwarted banks' redlining practices and selling to people of all colors, creeds and sexual orientations.
NEWS
May 27, 2015 | By Yuge Xiao, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their classmates may be at the pool or on the beach this summer, but seven Hill School students plan to be in Turkey, volunteering at a Syrian refugee camp. The students, all girls, will travel as part of the Give A Hand program, started last year by Hülya Kösematoglu, a sophomore at the Pottstown boarding school. In addition to helping the refugees, the goal of the girls is to learn about local life and Turkish culture. Kösematoglu, who moved to the United States two years ago from Istanbul, said she realized the Western world has a drastically different view of her home.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The news from the Middle East has become so grim I am always looking for a bright spot. So, on a recent trip to Iraqi Kurdistan, it was a relief and a surprise to come across an upbeat story in an unexpected place: a church in Erbil that houses Christian refugees from northern Iraq who barely escaped the ISIS invasion in August. The first hint of something unexpected was the shrieks of children's laughter when I entered the Mar Elias churchyard. The next surprise was seeing young boys and girls playing volleyball together on a paved court under improvised night lights, a sight I'd never seen in the gender-conscious Middle East.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Trudy Rubin is on a 10-day assignment to the Mideast. In Erbil, the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan, she is talking with Kurdish leaders, peshmerga commanders, U.S. military trainers, and Christian refugees. Next, in Jordan, she will interview officials about their fight with the Islamic State, as well as Syrian refugees at the Zaatari camp. Follow her @trudyrubin.
NEWS
November 25, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Newly arrived Iraqi refugee Razan Alkasey struggled Sunday to find the right words to explain the meaning of Thanksgiving. After recounting a harrowing escape from Baghdad with her four sons and a daughter and only a few belongings, Alkasey, 48, easily embraced the American holiday tradition and ticked off a list. "I thank God for freedom," she said. "I thank God we are all together. I thank God for everything, for giving me this opportunity to come here for a new life. " Alkasey was among about 200 refugees who attended a festive gathering to share a Thanksgiving meal at the Old Pine Community Center in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in an occasional series on America's changing face Annonciata Nsenga kicked off her sneakers, stood on a chair, and tapped a nail into a wall of her rented rowhouse in Point Breeze. Eighteen years after she and her husband, Jean Pierre, both Congolese, fled their homeland's violence for a refugee camp in Rwanda - and five months into their new lives in Philadelphia - the rail-thin mother of five finally felt comfortable enough to hang a fresh portrait of the family, dressed nattily, smiling hopefully.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
SOM MAYA TAMANG and her husband, Mongal Singh Tamang, fled their small cattle farm on the hillsides of Bhutan, a landlocked country in South Asia, with their young children clinging to their sides. After hearing of other ethnic Nepalis being murdered, beaten and abused by government forces, they feared that the army or police would come knocking on their door, too. It was 1992. The couple, then in their 30s, walked five days on foot westward from Bhutan to India with their six children, the oldest of whom was 12. In India, they boarded a truck for a night's journey to Nepal.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Mitchell Torh dipped his hand into the cool waters of the river that separates Liberia from Ivory Coast, the young boy didn't understand the stakes: His family was escaping from a civil war raging in his native Liberia. In Torh's memory, the cost of the canoe trip across the Cavalla River was two bags of rice. That started a journey that included a decade in a refugee camp in Ghana - where he was separated from his family - and finally ended at a soccer field in Southwest Philadelphia.
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