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NEWS
November 21, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students, their families and teachers in Radnor Township, to bring the city and suburbs closer together, will hold a Thanksgiving Day dinner tonight for more than 50 refugees living in West Philadelphia. The holiday dinner will be held in the high school cafeteria for people from Angola, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Hungary and Vietnam. The school district will provide a bus to transport the refugees. "This will be the first Thanksgiving for some of the refugees," said Lois Wysocki, a teacher and an organizer of the dinner.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The fate of hundreds of Kampuchean refugees who fled a camp controlled by communist Khmer Rouge guerrillas remained in doubt yesterday. The Thai military said that the 600 refugees would be taken from a camp run by the non-communist Khmer People's National Liberation Front and returned to the Khmer Rouge. But U.S. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said the Thai government had confirmed to U.S. officials that the refugees would be allowed to remain in non-communist resistance camps.
NEWS
July 2, 1986 | By Leah Leatherbee
Tomorrow, a four-day celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty will begin. A mile away 250 illegal immigrants will languish in the Varick Street detention facility. Throughout the country about 5,000 illegal immigrants, in addition to another 2,000 Cubans, will be imprisoned in detention centers and penitentiaries throughout the United States. A large proportion of these people are political asylum applicants who have fled repressive regimes in Haiti, Cuba, Iran, Afghanistan, El Salvador, Poland, Guatemala, South African, Ethiopia and elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The trucks with forlorn passengers huddled in back lumber through the darkness to the ominous camp. When they arrive, loudspeakers above the fences blare orders in strident German. It is a scene made familiar by films devoted to the Holocaust, and the knowledge of the fate that awaits the prisoners when they reached the camp always makes it profoundly moving. But in Silver City we are dealing with survivors who somehow managed to endure the unspeakable and live to become refugees.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | By Jerry Byrd and Tonya Fox, Special to the Inquirer
In 1945, Elena Santora, her brother and parents, refugees from the civil war in Spain, reached Texas. Their flight had taken them through France, Venezuela, Mexico and, finally, to New York, where Elena, then 13, looked about in bewilderment. "It was a whole new culture, new ways," Santora said last week. "My most vivid recollection was starting school without being able to communicate. There were no ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) classes back then. " Today, Santora, of Drexel Hill, uses her experiences as an immigrant to help new waves of refugees fleeing other bloody civil wars.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The patient wanderer looking for shelter hopes that if the door slams in her face, perhaps a window will open. Such was the case in 1938 when Jews eager to escape the Nazi threat in Europe found virtually all the world's ports closed to them after the Evian Conference. There, the United States joined Britain, Canada and dozens of other democracies in refusing to amend immigration laws to accommodate political refugees. While there was no available safe harbor in the West, one remained open in Shanghai, the Chinese port city where an estimated 20,000 refugees of sufficient means booked passage on the eve of Japanese occupation.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
About 10 men and women sat in lawn chairs on the grass outside their homes near Phoenixville recently, talking and joking among themselves. They smiled and waved as a car slowly passed. Behind them, clothes lay draped over a line hanging between two buildings. Children played nearby, chasing each other on rusty, single-speed bicycles. It could have been a scene from any neighborhood. But this neighborhood was the Valley Forge Christian College, the language was Ukrainian and the neighbors were refugees who have found a temporary home at the college.
NEWS
December 25, 1988 | By Elisabeth Ryan Sullivan, Special to The Inquirer
"Christmas cookies!" Helena Sedinova said with a burst of laughter, showing off her expanding English vocabulary - in a heavy Czech accent. Her crescent-shaped goodies coated with powdered sugar were piled high in a ceramic bowl, awaiting nibblers. Her handmade silvery angels and feathery birds twirled from the branches of a 7-foot tree near the foyer. A simple wreath hung above the fireplace in the brick, ranch-style home in Mount Laurel. For weeks, the 34-year-old Czech refugee has baked and crafted and planned for today.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | By Carol Rosenberg, Inquirer Gulf Staff
Thousands of war refugees are trapped on the Iraqi side of the Iraqi- Jordanian border as Iraqi border guards refuse them permission to leave, relief officials reported yesterday. With temperatures plunging - this weekend, it snowed here - many of the refugees are living in their cars. Others are huddled in tents against frigid desert winds, the officials said. Members of a French relief group, Doctors without Borders, are waiting on the Jordanian side of the border with 17,000 blankets, hopeful that refugees would soon be allowed to leave Iraq.
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NEWS
August 10, 2016
By Pete Hoekstra Last month, a Syrian asylum-seeker who was set to be deported detonated a nail-filled suicide bomb outside of a concert in southern Germany. German Chancellor Angela Merkel admitted that members of the Islamic State were among the more than 1 million migrants from destabilized areas of the Middle East and Africa whom she invited into her country. In the days prior to the Bastille Day massacre in Nice, France's intelligence chief warned that another attack on French soil or a mass sexual assault by migrants - similar to the one that occurred in Germany on New Year's Eve - could result in a "civil war. " The Dutch are investigating a possible jihadist cell in a refugee center in the Netherlands, and Norwegian police arrested a former Syrian al-Qaeda fighter seeking asylum in Europe.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
As Germany struggles to integrate a million or so immigrants from Muslim lands, a once-taboo question has gone public: Are Islamic precepts compatible with the West? The government has emphasized economic opportunity as an antidote to radicalization, but has paid less attention to who will fund the mosques and imams to serve the refugees. Trudy Rubin writes from Berlin.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
BERLIN - On a trip to the beach, a German friend recently saw two teenage Afghan refugee boys stare in shock at female bathers in scanty bikinis. She overheard one youth agitatedly ask the German volunteer accompanying him: "Where are their fathers? Where are their fathers?" The good news is that the boy spoke German and had a German friend who could explain the culture gap between Afghanistan and Europe. The bad news is obvious: Germany has an overwhelming task trying to integrate many of the million or so Muslim migrants who arrived in 2015.
NEWS
July 4, 2016
BERLIN - Lilas Al Loulou was an English literature major in Damascus and a political activist during the Arab Spring uprising. Firas Ibrahim owned a photo studio in Damascus that made wedding videos. Ahmed Samer ran a small business in Aleppo with his wife that sold air conditioners and fridges. All three fled Syria's civil war and made the risky sea journey to Greece and onward to Germany in 2015. They don't fit the fearsome stereotypes that drove the Brexit vote and have propelled populist parties across Europe.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
BERLIN - Whatever happened to all those refugees? Last summer, TV screens were filled with horrific stories of Syrian (and Iraqi and Afghan) refugees risking their lives on sea and land to reach Germany. Chancellor Angela Merkel welcomed them as a matter of principle, but her decision angered other European nations. It also helped fuel a wave of European hostility toward immigrants and the European Union's policy of open borders. That hostility in turn fueled Britain's Brexit vote.
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Doubling down on Philadelphia's high-profile support for immigrants and refugees, Mayor Kenney on Monday pushed back against national candidates who "use immigration as a political football. " "I'm not going to allow anyone, Donald Trump or anyone," to impugn immigrants and refugees, he said. "Philadelphia is going to be a sanctuary for people who need protection. " Kenney's remarks were part of a City Hall reception for World Refugee Day, an international observance held annually on June 20, now in its 15th year.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
In this sour campaign season, where the immigration issue has turned so ugly, it's instructive to watch the European debate over migrants. That debate should make Americans realize how lucky we are. As an immigration country, we have a proven ability to absorb newcomers, including those from Muslim countries. (And we could resolve the problem of illegals from south of the border if both parties cooperated.) Europe, on the other hand, has failed to integrate generations of Muslim guest workers, many of whom still live in ghettos and are preyed on by radical Islamists.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
The greatest threat to American security is something most Americans never think of. President Obama touched on it in his speech to the European people on Monday in Germany. I'm not referring to ISIS, although Obama called the terrorist group "the most urgent threat to our nations" in his remarks. I'm talking about a more existential threat to Europe (and America): a diminishing faith in democracy as a political system. On the continent, this is manifested by the widening cracks in the European Union and the rise of radical right-wing parties.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Six months before Durga Dulal arrived in Philadelphia as a refugee from Bhutan, fire swept through the U.N. camp in the Himalayas where she, her husband, and their four children lived, consuming all they owned. Five years later, the memory still makes the otherwise sunny woman's eyes well. Her family, she said, was traumatized - though it fared better than three camp neighbors who, despondent over their losses, committed suicide. Dulal, 46, was unburdening herself to a social worker at the Philadelphia Refugee Mental Health Collaborative, an innovative program that since 2011 has helped refugees not only heal from past ordeals, but also overcome the culture shock of life in America.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
When Chris Cotter set out to make his documentary about human-rights atrocities in Eritrea, his goal was for it to have an impact. Now it appears it is. This week, the West Chester filmmaker screened his work, Refugee: The Eritrean Exodus , for employees at the State Department, who he hopes will use it to spread the word. The film has also aired or has scheduled showings in New York, California, London, and Barcelona. But the most heartening news might have come from an advocate for an Eritrean who had fled his homeland and was seeking asylum in Europe.
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