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Refugees

NEWS
April 6, 1999 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer
Maybe it was the footage of a crying child looking lost and frail among the mass of hungry refugees. Or the vivid description of their new homes, sheets of plastic haphazardly spread across soggy fields where human waste is squashed into the mud. Whatever the jolt, people in Philadelphia and elsewhere across the country have in the last few days started to reach out to help the hordes of ethnic Albanians fleeing Kosovo. Americans still may barely be able to pronounce the name of this war-torn province of Serbia, but it doesn't seem to matter any more.
NEWS
November 23, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
WINDHAM, N.H. - Gov. Christie blasted "murderous, radical Islam" and spoke at length of the toll of Sept. 11 while bringing a national security focus to town-hall meetings Saturday in New Hampshire. "This campaign changed eight days ago. It changed," Christie told a packed room at a municipal building in Stratham on Saturday morning, referring to the terror attacks in Paris. "When evil gets visited upon innocent people, the American people react. " Later Saturday, at a town-hall meeting at a bar in a bowling alley, Christie described learning that people he knew had been killed in the Sept.
NEWS
February 16, 1998 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the ash of her bombed home, the bent woman lifted the only thing she has recovered from the time before the war: a porcelain tea cup trimmed in gold and speckled with tiny moons. The charred cup carried memories of her "fairy tale" house of lace and sunlight; of her husband, who never heard the mortar shell whistling in the night; of the bullet that pierced her grandson's lung; of the soldiers who tore off her jewelry; and of the fire, that endless sweep of flame. Ajva Taslaman doesn't want to cry. But she does.
NEWS
February 16, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Hundreds of hungry women and children yesterday streamed out of the Rashidiyeh Palestinian refugee camp near Tyre to buy food after Shiite Muslims eased a 4 1/2-month-long siege. The Amal militia allowed the Palestinians out of the seaside shantytown near the port city south of Beirut at 7 a.m., reporters said in telephoned dispatches. A similar, though smaller, evacuation at the Bourj el-Barajneh Palestinian camp in Beirut was followed by a fierce battle between Amal and Palestinian fighters, in which at least one Palestinian died, police said.
NEWS
October 27, 1990 | By Idris M. Diaz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evelyn M. Hidalgo, who was accused of swindling a social service agency for refugees out of $38,000, dropped to her knees in tears yesterday after a Common Pleas Court judge found her not guilty. Hidalgo, a one-time treasurer of Lucien Blackwell's campaign for City Council and member of the Mayor's Commission for Women, had been charged with 21 counts of theft and forgery. Each count carried a maximum of seven years in jail. "It's been one and a half years of hardship," said Hidalgo, 43, a Filipino immigrant, of her ordeal since being arrested in May 1989.
NEWS
November 23, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Galeb Salman has lived in North Philadelphia for just two months. But for the first time in 25 years, he feels as if he's home. An Iraqi citizen raised in Kuwait, Salman was traveling in Thailand on a tourist visa in 1990 on the day Iraq invaded Kuwait. The war left him stranded, unable to return home or secure travel documents. He stayed, married a Thai woman and started a family. But he could not obtain work permits, and at one point spent more than two years in an immigrant jail.
NEWS
July 9, 1992 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After almost six years in exile, living in Delaware County as refugees from the civil war in El Salvador, Luis and Sonia Ramos and their three children are finally going . . . home? Home is certainly what Luis and Sonia call the town of Apopa, which they fled in 1986, fearing right-wing death threats. Apopa is where Luis and Sonia, both 38, spent most of their adult lives. The Ramoses were union activists. They were forced to leave their home and their jobs as textile workers, forced to leave their children behind with relatives to come to the United States, where they were held as illegal immigrants when they crossed the Mexican border seeking asylum.
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hazami Sayed, executive director of Philadelphia's Al-Bustan center for Arab culture, has one son in college and another about to go. In the fall she will be an empty nester - and ready, willing, and able to open her West Philadelphia home to a new initiative designed to assuage the world's worst refugee crisis since World War II. "With both my boys away next year I would gladly accommodate one or two refugees and help them get resettled," she...
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman whose job it was to help refugees was held for trial yesterday on charges of stealing about $35,000 meant for them. Evelyn M. Hidalgo, 41, former executive director of the Philadelphia Refugee Service Center, on Sansom Street near 40th, was held for trial by Municipal Judge Louis G.F. Retacco on charges of theft by deception and 22 counts of forgery. "Hidalgo exhibited a callous disregard for the needs of the refugees she was enlisted to protect," said District Attorney Ronald D. Castille.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | By Julie Mertus
Today the 250,000 refugees flooding into Serbia are a humanitarian disaster, but tomorrow they may become the fuse of the next political disaster. Unless the United States and other members of the international community send large amounts of humanitarian aid into Serbia, extremists could use these refugees to ignite the next and probably bloodiest phase of war: a civil war in reduced Yugoslavia itself and/or a new war between Serbia and Croatia. The Croatian offensive against the Serbian-held and Serbian-populated area of southern Croatia known as Krajina won back territory for Croatia, but in the process it forced nearly the entire population on the road to Serbia.
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