CollectionsRefugees
IN THE NEWS

Refugees

NEWS
August 22, 1996 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer
If you are a refugee living in Philadelphia and getting by on welfare, Uncle Sam has three little words for you: Get a job. And three more: Don't get sick. President Clinton signs legislation today that radically overhauls the nation's welfare system, ending a 61-year guarantee that the poor are entitled to federal benefits. The impact of the law and new state welfare-reform legislation on single mothers and poor inner-city neighborhoods has gotten considerable attention.
NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA As war-displaced Syrians face another harsh winter in windblown camps, Philadelphia groups are collecting "gently used" coats, blankets, shoes, and boots for the refugees. Coordinated locally by the Philadelphia Arab-American Development Corp. (AADC), and with the participation of the city's Al-Aqsa Mosque, Independence Charter School, and Science Leadership Academy, the clothing drive was conceived by students and expanded by Qatar Foundation International (QFI), a Washington-based nonprofit established by the Persian Gulf nation.
NEWS
April 25, 1999 | By Candace Heckman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Military command staff at Fort Dix are preparing to accept up to 2,000 Kosovar refugees who could be flown to the United States as soon as Friday, base officials said. A Pentagon official said the Burlington County Army post was tentatively selected Friday after a Defense Department review of military bases along the East Coast. Fort Dix is one of nine posts on the U.S. mainland that have been told to prepare for the 20,000 Kosovar refugees the United States has agreed to accept, said Carolee Nisbet, a Fort Dix spokeswoman.
NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
It began as a holiday buffet for about 80 new refugee families, many of whose members had never tasted turkey, let alone attended an early celebration of Thanksgiving. Two hours later, as the brightly dressed Nepalese, Burmese, and Sudanese pushed back from banquet tables inside Old Pine Community Center in Society Hill, the scene last Sunday looked more like a spirited pilot for "New Americans Got Talent. " As an African guitarist sang and the crowd clapped in unison, several Sudanese men squatted deeply, then launched themselves high with the repetitive, two-foot hops characteristic of massalite dance.
NEWS
September 15, 1989 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
Only two weeks ago, East German refugees Ronald and Andrea Frister and their 3-year-old son, Christian, evaded police patrols in a daring dash across the Hungarian border to the West. Now, after shuttling among a series of refugee camps, Ronald Frister says he is "eager to start work" at a factory that manufactures boilers and move his family into a furnished house in this small city in Bavaria's lake district. "We have been treated with great kindness since we arrived in Germany," Andrea Frister said yesterday at a former school hastily converted into a shelter for 75 refugees, most of whom crossed into West Germany by car, bus, or train after Hungary flung open its borders early Monday.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
The exodus of thousands of East Germans crowding Hungarian refugee camps might not begin "for weeks," Hungary's deputy foreign minister said yesterday. Ferenc Somogyi said it would be "irresponsible" to name the date when the East Germans could leave to resettle in the West. "The final solution could drag on for days or even weeks," he told the Hungarian parliament, according to the official news agency MTI. Some frustrated East Germans said they were prepared to begin a hunger strike if they were not permitted to emigrate by Friday.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hundreds and hundreds of children play by day on the dusty streets of this makeshift city, set against steep craggy cliffs that separate Thailand from Kampuchea. By night, they cower in dark bamboo huts and listen to the sound of artillery shells exploding on the other side of the mountains, a constant reminder that across the border their country is still at war. Most of the children here have never set foot in Kampuchea, and most of their parents have little desire to go back anytime soon, even though talk of sending them home is spreading like wildfire through this and other camps on the Thai border.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | BY CAL THOMAS
By rickety bus, by jalopy and on foot, by the hundred thousand and soon by the hundreds of thousands, Nicaraguans are coming to America. Yet this is not a happy circumstance about which Neil Diamond might sing in a future patriotic celebration. This is a serious problem that must be dealt with immediately by the Bush Administration. The flow of Nicaraguan refugees into Miami and Houston is the direct result of a U.S. Congress that refused to support the anti-Sandinista democratic resistance.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sigmund Tobias was 6 when he first stepped foot on the dock at Shanghai. It was the summer of 1939. A Jewish refugee from Germany, he was struck first by the diseased bodies strewn along the narrow streets like so much garbage. "People would call the hospital to come pick them up, but whoever called had to pay for the trip," said Tobias, 58. "You soon learned that no matter how unpleasant it was, you didn't call. " In 1988, when the tall, bearded professor of educational psychology at the City College of New York returned to Shanghai as a visiting professor, all vestiges of the Shanghai of his youth had been erased.
NEWS
July 19, 1988
For years the administration has been urging the Soviets to allow freedom of emigration, not only for Jews but for anyone else who wants to leave. But in a bizarre twist, just as Moscow began opening its gates as urged, it looked like Washington was going to block the flow. Without any warning, the U.S. embassy in Moscow this month declared an across-the-board, three-month postponement on processing visas because the embassy was short of funds. This spelled disaster for 3,400 Armenians, Pentacostalists and a few Jews, who had already gotten permission to leave.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|