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Regime Change

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NEWS
October 3, 2002
SADDAM HUSSEIN is a dictator who has held his people down for too long. Iraqis need democracy and the United States will bring it, as George Bush has suggested. However, the single-minded approach towards Iraqi regime-change ignores the fact that similar governments exist in the region. Only a fool would suggest that U.S. oil interests and economic concerns do not preclude any real criticism of Saudi Arabia by the Bush or previous administrations. Obviously, oil and U.S. corporate involvement in Saudi Arabia are the deciding factor in our policy of tolerance toward their antiquated system of governance.
NEWS
September 5, 2003 | By ROBERT S. NIX
ONE TACTIC being used to try to preserve Philadelphia's tired political status quo in this mayoral race is the attempt by some to cajole the city's approximately 685,000 registered Democrats into voting strictly along party lines. It's being tried both with vacuous threats like, "Do you really want to put the party of Newt Gingrich in charge of Philadelphia?" as well as serious threats like an unlit incendiary device thrown through the window of a Democrats for Katz field office.
NEWS
September 14, 2002 | By Charles Krauthammer
So much for the great Republican split over Iraq. Just weeks ago, we were told that it included the old-guard heavyweights: Brent Scowcroft, Henry Kissinger, James Baker, Dick Armey and, heaviest of all, Colin Powell. Let's review the lineup. Scowcroft wrote an op-ed warning against war on Iraq on the grounds that it would irrevocably damage the war on terrorism. Yet on Monday he told CNN's Judy Woodruff, "The direction the President is taking, I think, is exactly the right direction, to reach out, to get our friends, to get our allies, to get the U.N. involved.
NEWS
September 4, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Now that NATO has helped to overthrow Moammar Gadhafi, some pundits are calling for similar action against Syria. So far the chorus is muted, composed mainly of op-eds by neoconservatives who promoted the Iraq war. Back then they were certain that regime change in Baghdad would undercut Iran and make the region Israel-friendly (the opposite happened). They now argue that regime change in Damascus - a close friend to Iran - would undercut Tehran and help Israel. They want NATO to take on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad next.
NEWS
March 7, 2003
AS MUCH AS the lies of Saddam Hussein undercut the peace movement, the ineptitude of President Bush is undercutting the arguments of those of us who have come to the reluctant conclusion that military action is needed in Iraq. By insisting during last night's press conference that regime change in Iraq is the only solution he will accept, Bush has guaranteed that the United States will deal with Iraq essentially alone - not just when the bullets fly but during the tougher job of rebuilding the country afterward.
NEWS
February 26, 2003 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The U.N. Security Council is likely to spend the next two weeks debating war with Iraq, but the issue has already been decided: President Bush intends to go to war with or without U.N. support. His goal is a top-to-bottom regime change, an outcome not mentioned in any U.N. resolution. Bush and his advisers contend that the only way to remove the threat of chemical, biological or nuclear weapons in Iraq is to remove Saddam Hussein and his entire power structure. "Now is the time," Bush said yesterday.
NEWS
January 17, 2003 | By Trudy Rubin
There is a case to be made for ousting Saddam Hussein. The trouble is, the Bush administration hasn't made it yet. If it had, public opinion might be less confused about the purpose of an Iraq war. Ex-Iraq hawks like me might be less worried about a war's outcome. The real case for Iraqi regime change, however, isn't grandiose enough for the Bush administration's global planners. Instead, the White House has made Saddam's fate into a stalking horse for a broad new doctrine of preemptive war, and for elaborate plans to redesign the entire Mideast.
NEWS
February 25, 2003
IWAS surprised to find the Daily News supporting the so-called peace protesters and calling for President Bush to heed public opinion on going to war against Iraq to remove the sadistic Saddam (editorial Feb. 20). After all, it was just under four years ago that you published editorials with these warmongering headlines: "End Milosevic's Reign of Terror"/"Why a War Against Milosevic Is Justified. " You were for regime change, armed intervention AND going in without the U.N., which never sanctioned the Kosovo action.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Ibrahim Sharqieh and Courtney Freer
The recent killing in Yemen of the American-born al-Qaeda figure Anwar al-Awlaki, the return of the country's president, and a brutal crackdown on peaceful antigovernment protesters have brought tensions there to a dangerous level, threatening to plunge the country into civil war. But the international community has failed to take a stand, revealing a cold-blooded double standard on the Arab Spring uprisings. It's clear that the United States and its allies are interested only in "regime renovation" in Yemen, not regime change.
NEWS
March 19, 2003 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
THE BUSH administration: Not a bad team for conventional wars. First Afghanistan, now Iraq. Corporate personnel for a corporate mission. They're certain to meet the challenge they've defined for themselves: winning a war against Iraq. That's defensible. Regime change in Baghdad is good for the Anglo-American national interest, for the Iraqi people and for counter-terrorism. But I disagree with their priorities: Both crushing al Qaeda and resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict are more important.
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NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Those who criticize President Obama's weak foreign policy (as I have done often) have been looking for smarter ideas from prospective candidates for 2016. Judging by Lettergate - the bizarre tale of the missive sent by Sen. Tom Cotton and 46 Republican colleagues to Iran's ayatollahs - the Republicans aren't ready for prime time. Take a look at the broader implications of the letter and you'll see why. What was most disturbing about the letter was the carelessness with which it was dispatched.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Late last month, an American from Florida blew himself up in a suicide attack in Syria. Here's the good news: Moner Mohammad Abusalha's truck bomb was aimed at Syrian government forces, not at some building in New York City. The bad news: As many as 70 Americans and 3,000 Europeans are among more than 7,000 foreigners from 50 countries fighting with Syrian rebel groups linked to al-Qaeda. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper says these groups are already training people "to go back to their [home]
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Paul J. Griffiths
For Catholics around the world, there is no greater force for change than the views of a pope. Pope Francis gets an opportunity to shed light on what kind of papacy his will be this week when he takes his first trip abroad, to Brazil. This is a visit to watch, for it will not only reveal more about this new papacy, but it may also spark social and economic change in the region. As an Argentine and the cardinal archbishop of Buenos Aires from 2001 until his election, Francis knows well the plight of millions of poor people in the region.
SPORTS
October 15, 2012 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER COLUMNIST
Andy Reid didn't speak to the Eagles in the locker room very long after Sunday's overtime loss to the Detroit Lions. Maybe he didn't trust what he would say. Maybe he didn't want to hang around them that much. And maybe they felt the same way. The Eagles had an opportunity against a truly mediocre team to put away an easy win and slide into the bye week with a 4-2 record and the makings of an upbeat season narrative. Even if they were to emerge from the bye with a loss to the undefeated Atlanta Falcons, the Eagles would still have been above .500 and headed into a forgiving stretch of the schedule.
NEWS
February 26, 2012
Christopher R. Hill is a former U.S. assistant secretary of state, and the dean of the University of Denver's Korbel School of International Studies Forty years ago, in February 1972, President Richard M. Nixon journeyed to China. On the seventh day of "the week that changed the world," as Nixon called it, he and Chinese Premier Chou En-lai signed the Shanghai Communiqué, which began the normalization of bilateral relations and bound the United States, a principal supporter of Taiwan, to the People's Republic's "One China" doctrine.
SPORTS
December 9, 2011 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
Don't tell that other team in town, but it can be done. The Flyers are proving that you can radically remake your team, infuse it with youth, and see immediate success. Their coach, Peter Laviolette, is not making excuses about youth or about needing more time to jell. That's because, with Mike Richards and Jeff Carter and their shadows gone, Claude Giroux has blossomed into one of the game's best and most entertaining players. It's because, with Captain Chris Pronger injured, kids like Marc-Andre Bourdon and Kevin Marshall are playing good, sound defense.
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Elizabeth A. Kennedy and Paul Schemm, Associated Press
BEIRUT - Syria's president faced a growing challenge to his iron rule from home and abroad Wednesday, with renegade troops launching their most daring attack yet on the military and world leaders looking at possibilities for a regime without Bashar Assad. France recalled its ambassador to Damascus in the wake of recent attacks against diplomatic missions and increasing violence stemming from the 8-month-old uprising. French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe warned that "the vise is tightening" around Assad, and a government spokeswoman said Paris is working with the Syrian opposition to find an alternative to the regime.
SPORTS
October 19, 2011 | BY DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
THE NEW owners were introducing themselves yesterday at the Palestra. One of them described 76ers president Rod Thorn as the captain of the ship. That may be true in one sense. The reality is that coach Doug Collins is the face of this franchise. On a team without a superstar or even an All-Star, the coach, so savvy, knowledgeable and fan friendly, has given the franchise credibility it did not have. And whenever (if?) they play basketball this season, the coach will once again be front and center.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Ibrahim Sharqieh and Courtney Freer
The recent killing in Yemen of the American-born al-Qaeda figure Anwar al-Awlaki, the return of the country's president, and a brutal crackdown on peaceful antigovernment protesters have brought tensions there to a dangerous level, threatening to plunge the country into civil war. But the international community has failed to take a stand, revealing a cold-blooded double standard on the Arab Spring uprisings. It's clear that the United States and its allies are interested only in "regime renovation" in Yemen, not regime change.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Zeina Karam and Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - A group of military defectors known as the Free Syrian Army is emerging as the first armed challenge to President Bashar al-Assad's authoritarian regime after seven months of largely nonviolent resistance. Riad al-Asaad, the group's leader and an air force colonel who recently fled to Turkey, said in an interview Wednesday that he had more than 10,000 members and called on fellow soldiers to join him in overthrowing the "murderous" regime. While analysts said those numbers were probably inflated, Asaad was confident more soldiers would join his ranks.
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