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Regional District

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NEWS
February 2, 1992 | By Lisa Schwartz, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
For the second year in a row, officials at the Camden County Eastern Regional School District find that state funding formulas are squeezing school finances. The squeeze is so tight that if preliminary estimates by school officials hold true, the district might have to eliminate 11 proposed staff positions for the new high school building now under construction. Though the board introduced a tentative 1992-93 budget on Jan. 22, the numbers had to be altered after the state released revised aid figures on Tuesday.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | By Mike Madden, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The next step toward dissolving the Lower Camden County Regional School District will begin here in about two weeks, when Clementon residents vote on a $1.9 million bond proposal to fund construction needed to house the borough's seventh and eighth graders. In May, voters in the seven towns in the district approved a plan to dissolve the district, but the regional district cannot actually split up until every student is guaranteed a spot in one of the local districts that will take over seventh through 12th grades.
NEWS
September 28, 1988 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Officials from the seven school districts that make up the Lower Camden County Regional School system will meet tomorrow to discuss a Berlin Township initiative to withdraw seventh and eighth graders from the regional district schools. The students would be sent to schools within their home districts, if possible. The meeting is scheduled for 8:30 p.m. at the Berlin Township hall. One item sure to come up is the legality of the concept. According to Donald Beineman, Camden County schools superintendent, state statutes say that regional systems can be enlarged or eliminated, but they say nothing about being reduced.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
It has been said that breaking up is hard to do. That seems especially true for the seven towns that make up the Lower Camden County Regional School District, which have been fighting about breaking up for at least eight years. But that changed last night, when representatives from the seven towns unanimously agreed to consider a trial separation. That separation would remove about 1,600 seventh and eighth graders from the district's two regional middle schools and return them to their local school districts.
NEWS
July 9, 1986 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer correspondent Donna Ottaviano contributed to this article.)
Paul Winkler is breathing a measured sigh of relief. As superintendent of schools for the Lower Camden County Regional School District, Winkler fretted for months about how the district's ninth graders would fare on the High School Proficiency Test that this year became a requirement for graduation. But when the scores came in, Winkler was pleased. Results of the reading, writing and math test, administered to 86,000 ninth graders statewide in April, were released to local school districts during the second and third weeks in June.
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | By Deborah Kong, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More than 200 students, teachers and parents last night protested proposed cuts in staff and vocational and gifted and talented programs by the Lower Camden County Regional school board. The proposed cuts would include 20 staff positions and programs including auto trades, auto technology, building trades, nursing assistants and early childhood education, according to Jeanne Smith, the district's public information director. The budget process is taking place at a time of turmoil for the regional district, which has four schools: Overbrook Junior High School in Lindenwold, Overbrook Senior High School in Pine Hill, and Edgewood Junior and Senior High Schools in Winslow Township.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | By Christopher Mumma, Special to The Inquirer
When voters in Winslow Township go to the polls on April 24 to vote for Board of Education candidates, a major issue they will address is the much- discussed deregionalization of the Lower Camden Regional School District's seventh- and eighth-grade students. The current school board is unanimous in its support of removing the about 700 junior high school students from the regional schools and having them attend classes in their home districts. The board also would like to pull the 1,200 high school students out of the district as well, but has decided to take the process one step at a time, hoping to get the seventh- and eighth-graders out first.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | By Cathleen Egan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's back to the drawing board for the Lower Camden County Regional District school board. With voters overwhelmingly deciding last week to keep growing Winslow Township in the district, the board must come up with another way to solve overcrowding in the four secondary schools. The board's plan: Go back to the voters again and ask them if this time they'd be willing to approve a $57.4 million bond referendum to pay for a new school and renovation of four others - a move voters have historically rejected.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the ongoing saga of how to reorganize the seven-town Lower Camden County Regional School District, a new plan has surfaced. The proposal, dubbed "Option E," would allow Waterford and Chesilhurst to form a regional district with Winslow for their older students. Winslow would still become its own kindergarten-through-12th-grade district. But Waterford and Chesilhurst would either take back their seventh and eighth gradersand send their high school students to Winslow, or send their seventh through 12th graders to Winslow.
NEWS
December 21, 1993 | By Louis Hau, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Northern Burlington County Regional School District Board of Education decided last night to postpone certifying the results of last week's referendum on whether the method of financing the district should be changed from one based on property values to one based on per-pupil cost. The board said it wanted to await an interpretation of the vote by the state education commissioner. Of the 3,482 votes cast in last Tuesday's referendum in the four towns that comprise the district - Chesterfield, Mansfield, Springfield and North Hanover - 2,514 were in favor of change, and 968 were against.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edna Adams, 86, of Delran, who retired in the 1990s as secretary to the superintendent of the Lenape Regional High School District, died of cancer on Wednesday, Feb. 4, at home. Born in Mount Holly, Ms. Adams graduated from Mount Holly High School and worked as the private secretary to the district manager for what is now the YMCA of Burlington and Camden Counties. But, family friend Geraldine Krassner said, "she wanted to be a teacher. " Instead, she went to work for the administration which oversaw the teachers.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Toms River Board of Education has been ordered to pay a former student $68,000 for failing to take reasonable actions to stop students from harassing him because of their perceptions of his sexual orientation, the Attorney General's Office announced today. The award includes compensation for pain and suffering, plus interest, for the case that began more than a decade ago. This week's order in the landmark case affirms the earlier findings of lower courts, and later the New Jersey Supreme Court, that the student had been repeatedly bullied while the district's counseling of those harassing the student - identified as "L.W.
NEWS
August 18, 2003 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For freshman Rebecca Harris, the new school year brings a shot at junior varsity. For sophomore Danielle Allen, it means a possible run for student council. And for junior Keith Lurty, the 2003-04 school year will usher in new memories and fresh traditions for the first graduating class at Seneca High School. "It's something we can tell our kids and grandkids," said 16-year-old Lurty, who will be one of the 850 students in the Lenape Regional High School District to start the semester roaming Seneca's contemporary hallways and state-of-the-art classrooms.
NEWS
January 18, 2003 | By Dale Mezzacappa INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia is one of four school districts in the region that since 1995 have consistently made test-score gains at a rate at least twice the state average, according to a new, state-sponsored analysis by Standard & Poor's. The data, covering the years 1995 to 2001, show that city students improved on the Pennsylvania System of State Assessment (PSSA) by an average of seven points a year, compared with a state average of three. Despite the gains, Philadelphia is still one of the lowest-performing districts in the state.
NEWS
January 15, 2003 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Winslow teachers and support staff have authorized a strike if union negotiators fail to reach an agreement with the school district. It would be the first strike in the history of the Winslow Township Education Association, said Karen Joseph, a New Jersey Education Association spokeswoman. Talks with a state mediator resumed yesterday afternoon and lasted several hours. The main stumbling blocks were salaries and benefits, officials said. "Hopefully, they will be able to iron out those issues and reach a settlement," Joseph said.
NEWS
March 26, 2002 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Board of Education last night introduced a budget that would raise yearly school taxes by nearly $500 - and possibly more - for the typical homeowner while eliminating about 150 jobs, including those of 78 teachers. The board was also considering adding a second tax-levy question to the April 16 ballot. If it is not passed, an additional 27 teaching jobs would be cut. Winslow has become yet another in a string of area school districts to blame a hefty tax increase on flat state aid and rising health-care costs.
NEWS
December 25, 2001 | By Melanie D. Scott INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Lenape Regional High School Board of Education unanimously approved a new five-year contract for Superintendent Daniel Hicks that would take effect in January and expire in 2007. Hicks is currently in the third year of a five-year contract that would have expired in 2004. Nevertheless, the 11-member board voted on Dec. 19 to implement a new contract to extend his service. "The board was anxious to begin the new year with an assurance that Dr. Hicks was committed to remaining with the district for another five years," district spokesperson Patricia S. Milich said.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a newly re-formed district that is struggling to keep from laying off more than 100 teachers, school officials took a day last month to congratulate one another on completing a $14 million middle school on time and under budget. The school's choir and jazz band performed patriotic songs to celebrate their new home at the Nov. 10 dedication ceremony. This is the first year that the Pine Hill district encompasses kindergarten to 12th grade. The borough's middle school and high school students formerly attended the Lower Camden Regional School District, which also included Berlin Township, Chesilhurst, Clementon, Lindenwold, Waterford and Winslow before it was dissolved.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joseph Laufer of Vincentown, a former Burlington County College administrator, has been selected alumni coordinator for the Lenape Regional High School District. Laufer retired in 1997 after 27 years as an administrator and teacher at the county college. The regional high school district has nearly 30,000 alumni - 41 classes from Lenape High School (beginning with 1961); 30 from Shawnee (beginning with 1972) and 24 from Cherokee (beginning with 1978). For information about the alumni association call 609-268-2000, Ext. 5560.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Principal Michele Ferner's office door is adorned with a small, square calendar that lays out her plans next year, her first year of retirement. "Look, every day is a Saturday," Ferner said with a laugh. She has been principal of Edgewood Senior High School in Winslow for 8 1/2 years. "I never would have retired if this dissolution wasn't happening. " Ferner is one of 58 employees in the dissolving Lower Camden County Regional School District who, prompted by less-attractive contracts from the member districts, opted to retire early.
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