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NEWS
July 24, 2013
SEPTA SAW record ridership on its Regional Rail system last fiscal year with 36 million trips, the agency said yesterday. Ridership on the transit authority's 13 Regional Rail lines between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013, was up 2.2 percent from the previous year. SEPTA recorded 337.9 million trips on trains, buses and trolleys for the year. That number was down about 2 million trips from the previous year, but includes a two-day shutdown due to Superstorm Sandy. SEPTA said Regional Rail ridership has increased 50 percent over the last 15 years.
NEWS
December 16, 2011
SEPTA workers who maintain Regional Rail signals will get an 11.5 percent wage increase over five years under a deal approved Thursday by the SEPTA board. The terms of the new contract, which affects about 75 employees represented by the Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen, are similar to those negotiated by other unions in contracts with SEPTA over the last two years. The workers, whose wages have not increased since 2008, currently are paid from $26.55 to $28.85 an hour.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's Regional Rail lines were experiencing numerous delays and some cancellations Friday night because of crew shortages, an agency spokesman said. "We are confident we'll get people home," albeit with "significant delays," said Andrew Busch, the spokesman. "We have, unfortunately, some manpower issues, some crew shortages," Busch said. "We've had to cancel some trains. " What resulted was a "cascading effect" slowing down service "throughout the system," Busch said. No lines have been canceled for Friday night.
NEWS
February 16, 2000 | by Frank Dougherty, and Chris Brennan, Daily News Staff Writers
A passengerless SEPTA regional rail train was halted dead in its tracks this week when one of its steel wheels split in half. The unusual accident crippled the 14-year-old train as it traveled to the transit agency's newest station in Chester County. Neither the train operator nor the conductor was hurt. "It was a stress crack that began from the inside of the wheel," said Tom Dorricott, an official with the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. He added that a broken wheel could have caused a catastrophic derailment.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | by Chris Brennan Daily News Staff Writer
If the Transport Workers Union, Local 234, goes on strike this week, SEPTA passengers may flock to Regional Rail trains and suburban bus routes. SEPTA's City Transit Division, which carries 875,000 one-way riders a day, would be shut down by a Local 234 strike. That is 84 percent of SEPTA's daily business. Regional Rail trains, which carry 103,000 one-way passengers daily, would continue to run from the suburbs into Center City. SEPTA has 35 to 40 Regional Rail stations in the city, according to Bernard Cohen, the agency's chief operations officer.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | By Steve Boman, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Starting Sunday and continuing until Oct. 3, most Bucks County riders of SEPTA's regional rail lines will be taking a different route to Center City. Commuters who usually take the R2 Warminster, R3 West Trenton and R5 Lansdale-Doylestown train lines will be diverted onto the Broad Street subway line. Riders of the R8 Fox Chase line will be bused to the Market Frankford subway line. With more than 10,000 commuters to be affected by the diversions in Bucks County, reaction has been varied.
NEWS
February 17, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA has rediscovered its color palette. Last summer, SEPTA abandoned its R designations for Regional Rail lines and got rid of the color associated with each line. The red for the R7, the blue for the R5, and the other colors were replaced with a uniform blue-gray tint for all lines. Riders complained that without letters or colors, schedules for the different lines were hard to tell apart and hard to find in the station racks. So, with the release of spring rail schedules next month, SEPTA will have colored bars across the top of the timetables.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | By Richard Burke, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Councilwoman Happy Fernandez is asking SEPTA to reopen hearings on its recently announced service cutbacks, saying the transit authority is trying to eliminate some lines in secret. In a letter to SEPTA general manager Louis J. Gambaccini, Fernandez said the proposed cuts "fly in the face of common sense" and deserve closer scrutiny. She said SEPTA's presentation in public hearings earlier this month on proposed cutbacks in the Regional Rail division "did not clearly inform me and other concerned citizens on the extent of these additional cuts.
NEWS
April 2, 2003 | By Jere Downs INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Facing a projected $55 million deficit created in part by state budget-cutting, SEPTA announced a plan yesterday to raise fares and severely reduce service, including discontinuing four Regional Rail lines and shutting down or merging dozens of bus routes. An estimated 50,000 passengers - 12 percent of the transit agency's 430,000 daily riders - would be affected by the service cutbacks, set for October. "This is big; this is bad," SEPTA general manager Faye Moore said before a news conference.
NEWS
December 11, 2009 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The SEPTA board yesterday approved the contract that ended last month's six-day strike by bus drivers, subway and trolley operators and mechanics. The board's approval clears the way for SEPTA to distribute $1,250 "signing bonus" checks to each of the 5,100 workers represented by Transport Workers Union Local 234. The five-year contract provides a 2.5 percent raise in its second year, and a 3 percent raise in each of the final three years. It increases workers' contributions to the pension fund from the current 2 percent to 3 percent, and it increases the maximum pension to $30,000 a year from the current $27,000 a year.
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NEWS
April 4, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WHEN THE LAST of SEPTA's contracts with its unionized workers expires on Sunday, the clock starts ticking on the time bomb of a crippling transit strike. Willie Brown, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234, which represents 5,000 transit workers, told the Daily News yesterday that he does not want a strike. But this is the same Willie Brown who suddenly called one in 2009, leaving hundreds of thousands of SEPTA riders stranded for six days. Brown told the Daily News yesterday that he won't accept SEPTA's initial offer of a five-year contract with no raises during 2014 and 2015, a 6 percent raise spread over the next three years, increased employee contributions to health care and no pension plan for new hires.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
REMEMBER "American Graffiti"? Remember the hamburger-shop drive-in where all the cool kids with cars hung out? (That was California. Around here it was Hot Shoppes.) Did anything better capture the love affair between the automobile and the American teenager? It looks as though the romance is fading like a summer tan. That observation follows reporting by the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission that automobile use around here is down. The "why" is intriguing.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Philadelphia-area commuters, the possibility of a first-ever transit strike by all SEPTA union workers could loom large when a federally mandated mediation process for Regional Rail engineers expires later this year. After that, the engineers, who have been working without a new contract since 2010, would be permitted to strike. SEPTA's labor contract with city bus drivers and subway operators has already expired, and contracts with suburban operators and mechanics will expire in early April.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA SEPTA may restore weekend late-night service on the Broad Street and Market-Frankford lines, agency officials said Thursday. Because of increasing nightlife and residential activity in Center City, SEPTA may continue service after midnight, when subways now are replaced by "night owl" buses, general manager Joseph Casey said. The service might continue until 3 a.m., officials said. Initially, it would be limited to Friday and Saturday nights, in a pilot program to test the response.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's Regional Rail lines were experiencing numerous delays and some cancellations Friday night because of crew shortages, an agency spokesman said. "We are confident we'll get people home," albeit with "significant delays," said Andrew Busch, the spokesman. "We have, unfortunately, some manpower issues, some crew shortages," Busch said. "We've had to cancel some trains. " What resulted was a "cascading effect" slowing down service "throughout the system," Busch said. No lines have been canceled for Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Loretta Tague, an administrative assistant who lives in the Graduate Hospital neighborhood, has a love-hate relationship with SEPTA's 17 bus. This is what she loves: Every five minutes at rush hour, a sleek hybrid roars up to the corner of 20th and Carpenter Streets and promises to speed her to Center City in less time than it takes to punch an e-mail into her phone. This is what she hates: All too often, the driver refuses to stop and let her board. On Monday, at 8:51 a.m., Tague, nearly in tears, sent her boss a text.
NEWS
January 26, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Malfunctioning doors on SEPTA's Regional Rail trains and Market-Frankford subway-elevated cars have plagued riders this week, as snow and ice have crippled their automated operation. On the railroad, the new Silverliner V railcars appear to be especially vulnerable to snow and cold, leaving riders unable to get out at their stops. Snow and ice can short out electric motors or block the tracks on which the doors move, forcing train operators to "cut out" or turn off a door to permit a train to move.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
SPRING AND SUMMER will come and go before construction is finished on Dilworth Plaza - which flanks the west side of City Hall - pushing off the completion date for the project an additional 2 to 3 months. Center City District officials said yesterday that several unexpected snags in the construction phase and cost overruns are pushing the end date to Labor Day at the earliest. The original date of completion was slated for spring. "Relying on as-built drawings for Dilworth Plaza, which was completed in 1977, the Center City District and its construction team estimated in late 2011 the amount of underground demolition work that would be required in order to construct the three levels of the new Dilworth Plaza, while working around operating SEPTA lines," said Paul R. Levy, chief executive of the district.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | BY HARRIS M. STEINBERG
THERE ARE 96 acres of prime real estate hiding in plain sight in the middle of our resurgent city. We scuttle past them every day by car or train. In a land-rich city like Philadelphia, it is often hard to see the treasures lying just beneath our feet. I'm talking about the rail yards at 30th Street. Bounded by the Schuylkill on the east, JFK Boulevard on the south, 32nd Street to the west and Spring Garden Street to the north, the rail yards are the most significant piece of real estate in the city.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA has drafted a doomsday plan to eliminate nine of its 13 rail lines and shorten two others, close a subway line, and convert trolley routes to bus lines if the state doesn't come up with more money for public transit this year. SEPTA general manager Joseph Casey sent the plan to state Transportation Secretary Barry Schoch on Tuesday and laid it out for the state Senate Transportation Committee Thursday. The "service realignment plan" would begin next year and continue slashing service until 2023, when the SEPTA system would be a shadow of its current self.
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