CollectionsRegional Rail
IN THE NEWS

Regional Rail

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
SEPTA's Regional Rail lines lay empty today. And they'll stay that way for the foreseeable future, if union representatives are to be believed. The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen announced late last night that their members are now on strike, effectively shutting down the lines for the 60,000 people they serve daily. "There was no progress in these mediations," Arthur Davidson, general chairman for IBEW System Council No. 7, said last night.
NEWS
July 24, 2013
SEPTA SAW record ridership on its Regional Rail system last fiscal year with 36 million trips, the agency said yesterday. Ridership on the transit authority's 13 Regional Rail lines between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013, was up 2.2 percent from the previous year. SEPTA recorded 337.9 million trips on trains, buses and trolleys for the year. That number was down about 2 million trips from the previous year, but includes a two-day shutdown due to Superstorm Sandy. SEPTA said Regional Rail ridership has increased 50 percent over the last 15 years.
NEWS
December 16, 2011
SEPTA workers who maintain Regional Rail signals will get an 11.5 percent wage increase over five years under a deal approved Thursday by the SEPTA board. The terms of the new contract, which affects about 75 employees represented by the Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen, are similar to those negotiated by other unions in contracts with SEPTA over the last two years. The workers, whose wages have not increased since 2008, currently are paid from $26.55 to $28.85 an hour.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's Regional Rail lines were experiencing numerous delays and some cancellations Friday night because of crew shortages, an agency spokesman said. "We are confident we'll get people home," albeit with "significant delays," said Andrew Busch, the spokesman. "We have, unfortunately, some manpower issues, some crew shortages," Busch said. "We've had to cancel some trains. " What resulted was a "cascading effect" slowing down service "throughout the system," Busch said. No lines have been canceled for Friday night.
NEWS
February 16, 2000 | by Frank Dougherty, and Chris Brennan, Daily News Staff Writers
A passengerless SEPTA regional rail train was halted dead in its tracks this week when one of its steel wheels split in half. The unusual accident crippled the 14-year-old train as it traveled to the transit agency's newest station in Chester County. Neither the train operator nor the conductor was hurt. "It was a stress crack that began from the inside of the wheel," said Tom Dorricott, an official with the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. He added that a broken wheel could have caused a catastrophic derailment.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | by Chris Brennan Daily News Staff Writer
If the Transport Workers Union, Local 234, goes on strike this week, SEPTA passengers may flock to Regional Rail trains and suburban bus routes. SEPTA's City Transit Division, which carries 875,000 one-way riders a day, would be shut down by a Local 234 strike. That is 84 percent of SEPTA's daily business. Regional Rail trains, which carry 103,000 one-way passengers daily, would continue to run from the suburbs into Center City. SEPTA has 35 to 40 Regional Rail stations in the city, according to Bernard Cohen, the agency's chief operations officer.
NEWS
August 6, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ALMOST 22,000 Regional Rail passes remain for the weekend of Pope Francis' visit after the close of SEPTA's online papal pass lottery at 11:59 p.m. Monday, but it's still unclear which stations have passes remaining, said SEPTA spokeswoman Jerri Williams. SEPTA has 175,000 passes available for each day of the papal visit on Sept. 26 and 27 - or 350,000 passes total. Williams said 38,068 people entered SEPTA's papal lottery. Each entrant could request up to 10 passes and a total of 328,045 passes were requested.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | By Steve Boman, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Starting Sunday and continuing until Oct. 3, most Bucks County riders of SEPTA's regional rail lines will be taking a different route to Center City. Commuters who usually take the R2 Warminster, R3 West Trenton and R5 Lansdale-Doylestown train lines will be diverted onto the Broad Street subway line. Riders of the R8 Fox Chase line will be bused to the Market Frankford subway line. With more than 10,000 commuters to be affected by the diversions in Bucks County, reaction has been varied.
NEWS
August 22, 2016
"When [they] don't post that stuff and don't announce that stuff, you're just at their mercy. " - Rider Laurie Gerner, about her canceled train This is no way to run a railroad: SEPTA dispatchers "flying blind," or losing track of trains because of poor communication with Amtrak, and riders not knowing when their train will show up because of chronic lateness and unreliable status reports. Each weekday, 65,000 Regional Rail passengers ride in cars dating to the 1970s, on tracks that are 100 years old. No wonder more than 40,000 trains (17 percent)
BUSINESS
December 11, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A growing problem with lateness on the Regional Rail lines in the last year is driving SEPTA to make big changes to its schedule, agency officials said Wednesday. Those changes will begin Sunday throughout SEPTA's Regional Rail network, but the biggest adjustments will be on the Warminster and West Trenton Lines. Those lines will now terminate at 30th Street Station instead of at Philadelphia International Airport. There also will be a new, shortened Airport Line. West Trenton Line trains were on time 76 percent of the time in October, officials said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2016
                                         Pennsylvania   New Jersey    Banks                             Optional                Optional    Savings & loans          Optional                Optional    Federal agencies        Closed                    Closed    Federal courts             Closed                  ...
BUSINESS
August 22, 2016 | Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
When Bosun Odeniyi bought a taxi certificate in 1990, it meant freedom. Freedom from waiting for hours at the garage to pick up a car, from the ever-present leasing fees, and from not knowing whether a cab would even be available to drive. In 2016, the taxi certificate - now called a medallion - is certified dead weight. The medallion was long considered an ironclad investment, hitting its peak price at $545,000 in July 2014. But UberX came to Philadelphia in October of that year, sending a chill through the industry even before it arrived.
NEWS
August 22, 2016
"When [they] don't post that stuff and don't announce that stuff, you're just at their mercy. " - Rider Laurie Gerner, about her canceled train This is no way to run a railroad: SEPTA dispatchers "flying blind," or losing track of trains because of poor communication with Amtrak, and riders not knowing when their train will show up because of chronic lateness and unreliable status reports. Each weekday, 65,000 Regional Rail passengers ride in cars dating to the 1970s, on tracks that are 100 years old. No wonder more than 40,000 trains (17 percent)
BUSINESS
July 30, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
The Federal Railroad Administration released Thursday the public's input on its Northeast Corridor Futures proposals, a set of potential improvements and redesigns for Amtrak's route from Boston to Washington. Of 3,200 comments, 188 came from people in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. Those comments included enthusiasm for an Amtrak stop at Philadelphia International Airport, better connections between Amtrak and Regional Rail services, and a request for faster rail service between Philadelphia and Harrisburg.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
The last Philadelphia event connected with the Democratic National Convention will take the party's nominee to Temple University on Friday. But transportation officials aren't expecting Hillary Clinton's noon post-nomination rally to create much disruption. The Broad Street Line and Regional Rail will run as usual Friday through the Temple University stop, SEPTA officials said. City officials, too, said they expected minimal traffic delays. However, Temple officials said Thursday that commuters and those attending the rally could expect delays and tangled traffic.
NEWS
July 26, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
More than a dozen men bustled around the elevated railcar, attaching wires and sensors to it like doctors placing monitors on a heart patient. And like a heart patient undergoing a stress test, SEPTA is going to push the railcar to the max. "This is exceptional," said SEPTA senior project engineer Greg Buzby of the tests he and other engineers are performing on a Silverliner V, one of 120 cars pulled from service due to a faulty part. Over Independence Day weekend, SEPTA found a fatigue crack in one of the Silverliner V's equalizer beams, a piece that transfers the car's weight to its axles.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
It won't be like when the pope came to town. Sure, there are protests planned, cracks in some SEPTA trains, and any number of presidential motorcades whizzing through Philadelphia. But all in all, officials say, getting around the region during this week's Democratic National Convention shouldn't be too difficult. Shuttle buses, subways, and Ubers will move guests at the convention, and all of it should only mildly inconvenience people who couldn't care less that the donkeys are in town, organizers say. They plan to close streets only around the stadiums and keep highways open to passenger autos.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
It's been a dismal summer for SEPTA's rail commuters. But one group has been faring especially badly: the disabled. "There's a harsh irony to the fact that the newest, most accessible [cars] are the trains that had to be taken out of transportation," said Matthew Clark, an advocate for disability rights with the Fair Ride Philly Coalition, who uses a wheelchair. Disabled riders have also criticized the newer ride service Uber, saying it hasn't done enough on access. Many disabled find trains and cabs too inconvenient to deal with and often avoid them, Clark said.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A flawed weld that attaches a plate to a key weight-bearing beam is at the root of SEPTA's rail-car woes, the company that built the cars acknowledged for the first time Tuesday. "The design of how it was welded and the weld itself are in question," Andrew Hyer, marketing and business-development manager at Hyundai Rotem, said Tuesday in the company's first extended comments since cracks in the beams forced SEPTA to pull one-third of its rail cars from service. "How we decide to weld the material may make all the difference," Hyer said.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
SEPTA said Friday that it has leased 10 more rail cars to ease the crowding and delays that have plagued Regional Rail service during July. Schedules will be adjusted as of Monday to reflect the additional cars and make the best use of 18 leased cars already in service, the transit agency said. The crowding and delays are the result of cracks found in 115 of SEPTA's Silverliner V cars, which led the agency to pull all 120 cars from service two weeks ago. Officials say they hope to announce the results of their investigation into the cracks next week.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|