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NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
To cope with the unprecedented crowds anticipated for Pope Francis' visit in September, SEPTA plans to double its rail and subway capacity, limit train stops, and carry only Regional Rail passengers who purchased special passes in advance. Officials of SEPTA, Amtrak, PATCO, and other agencies joined Mayor Nutter at City Hall on Tuesday to outline transportation plans for the papal visit and the World Meeting of Families. As many as two million people are expected to jam the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to see the pope at a Saturday festival and again at a Sunday Mass on Sept.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
SEPTA's Regional Rail lines lay empty today. And they'll stay that way for the foreseeable future, if union representatives are to be believed. The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen announced late last night that their members are now on strike, effectively shutting down the lines for the 60,000 people they serve daily. "There was no progress in these mediations," Arthur Davidson, general chairman for IBEW System Council No. 7, said last night.
NEWS
July 24, 2013
SEPTA SAW record ridership on its Regional Rail system last fiscal year with 36 million trips, the agency said yesterday. Ridership on the transit authority's 13 Regional Rail lines between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013, was up 2.2 percent from the previous year. SEPTA recorded 337.9 million trips on trains, buses and trolleys for the year. That number was down about 2 million trips from the previous year, but includes a two-day shutdown due to Superstorm Sandy. SEPTA said Regional Rail ridership has increased 50 percent over the last 15 years.
NEWS
December 16, 2011
SEPTA workers who maintain Regional Rail signals will get an 11.5 percent wage increase over five years under a deal approved Thursday by the SEPTA board. The terms of the new contract, which affects about 75 employees represented by the Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen, are similar to those negotiated by other unions in contracts with SEPTA over the last two years. The workers, whose wages have not increased since 2008, currently are paid from $26.55 to $28.85 an hour.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's Regional Rail lines were experiencing numerous delays and some cancellations Friday night because of crew shortages, an agency spokesman said. "We are confident we'll get people home," albeit with "significant delays," said Andrew Busch, the spokesman. "We have, unfortunately, some manpower issues, some crew shortages," Busch said. "We've had to cancel some trains. " What resulted was a "cascading effect" slowing down service "throughout the system," Busch said. No lines have been canceled for Friday night.
NEWS
February 16, 2000 | by Frank Dougherty, and Chris Brennan, Daily News Staff Writers
A passengerless SEPTA regional rail train was halted dead in its tracks this week when one of its steel wheels split in half. The unusual accident crippled the 14-year-old train as it traveled to the transit agency's newest station in Chester County. Neither the train operator nor the conductor was hurt. "It was a stress crack that began from the inside of the wheel," said Tom Dorricott, an official with the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. He added that a broken wheel could have caused a catastrophic derailment.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | by Chris Brennan Daily News Staff Writer
If the Transport Workers Union, Local 234, goes on strike this week, SEPTA passengers may flock to Regional Rail trains and suburban bus routes. SEPTA's City Transit Division, which carries 875,000 one-way riders a day, would be shut down by a Local 234 strike. That is 84 percent of SEPTA's daily business. Regional Rail trains, which carry 103,000 one-way passengers daily, would continue to run from the suburbs into Center City. SEPTA has 35 to 40 Regional Rail stations in the city, according to Bernard Cohen, the agency's chief operations officer.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | By Steve Boman, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Starting Sunday and continuing until Oct. 3, most Bucks County riders of SEPTA's regional rail lines will be taking a different route to Center City. Commuters who usually take the R2 Warminster, R3 West Trenton and R5 Lansdale-Doylestown train lines will be diverted onto the Broad Street subway line. Riders of the R8 Fox Chase line will be bused to the Market Frankford subway line. With more than 10,000 commuters to be affected by the diversions in Bucks County, reaction has been varied.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Almost alone among the nation's railroads, SEPTA's Regional Rail network is on pace to meet a federal deadline of Dec. 31 to install a "positive train control" system to prevent accidents like the Amtrak derailment last week that killed eight and injured 200 passengers. SEPTA moved faster than most railroads to buy the necessary radio spectrum needed to send control information to trains. That gave SEPTA a crucial head start in 2010. And SEPTA delayed other projects for years to spend more than $300 million for positive train control because the federal government did not provide funding when it mandated the control system.
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Normal service resumed on SEPTA's Trenton commuter rail line shortly before noon Tuesday, about two and a half hours after a person was struck and killed south of the Bristol station. A 35-year-old man was struck by a Philadelphia-bound Regional Rail train between the Bristol and Croydon stations at about 9:15 a.m., a SEPTA spokeswoman said. The two-car train's 96 passengers were transferred to another train to complete their journey, and service was affected for trains in both directions until about 11:45 a.m.  
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
To cope with the unprecedented crowds anticipated for Pope Francis' visit in September, SEPTA plans to double its rail and subway capacity, limit train stops, and carry only Regional Rail passengers who purchased special passes in advance. Officials of SEPTA, Amtrak, PATCO, and other agencies joined Mayor Nutter at City Hall on Tuesday to outline transportation plans for the papal visit and the World Meeting of Families. As many as two million people are expected to jam the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to see the pope at a Saturday festival and again at a Sunday Mass on Sept.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
POPE FRANCIS is a man who likes to walk among the people, and those who are planning to see the pope in Philadelphia this September should be prepared to walk as well. Today marks 100 days until Pope Francis' visit and in advance of his trip, officials held a news conference at City Hall yesterday to give preliminary information about transportation during the papal visit. The one big takeaway: Unless you're in the Popemobile, don't try to drive in or around Center City on Sept.
REAL_ESTATE
June 15, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
At last count, there were a zillion Internet sites catering to apartment dwellers, of which Apartment List's is neither the greatest nor the least. All these sites conduct surveys. Most are silly, and so forgettable that I cannot even offer you an example. I'm not going to forget the latest survey at Apartmentlist.com, however, because of how Philadelphia appears to be perceived by renters here: 18,000 were surveyed nationally; a local number was not provided. The bottom line: Renters gave Philadelphia a C-minus for city satisfaction, ranking it 80th of 100 cities surveyed.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA on Friday celebrated an accomplishment that took 15 years, cost about $50 million, and is virtually invisible to its Regional Rail passengers. Crews installed a plaqueonthe overhead catenary wires by the Wallingford station marking the installation of 150 miles of new wiring to reduce train delays and improve performance. Catenary wires provide electric power to run Regional Rail trains over the system's 280 miles of track. Friday was a rare chance for SEPTA workers like lineman first class Bernie Shine, 49, of Collingswood, to bask in the limelight.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christmas came early for SEPTA on Thursday. The transit agency's board of directors authorized nearly $300 million in vehicle purchases and construction projects. Also, it approved a $1.36 billion operating budget and $535 million capital budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1. Separately, the board approved a new advertising policy to prohibit political ads, following a federal court ruling earlier this year that required SEPTA to accept bus ads featuring Adolf Hitler.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA plans to spend up to $154 million for 18 new Regional Rail locomotives, the authority's biggest railroad acquisition in a decade. The electric locomotives would replace eight aging engines operating on the Lansdale-Doylestown, Paoli-Thorndale, Trenton, and Wilmington-Newark lines, and add capacity to other regional lines. The SEPTA board is expected to approve the purchase on Thursday, with the locomotives to be delivered in 2018. SEPTA is buying 13 "Cities Sprinter" ACS-64 locomotives to be built by Siemens Industry Inc., the German conglomerate, at its factory in Sacramento, Calif.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Almost alone among the nation's railroads, SEPTA's Regional Rail network is on pace to meet a federal deadline of Dec. 31 to install a "positive train control" system to prevent accidents like the Amtrak derailment last week that killed eight and injured 200 passengers. SEPTA moved faster than most railroads to buy the necessary radio spectrum needed to send control information to trains. That gave SEPTA a crucial head start in 2010. And SEPTA delayed other projects for years to spend more than $300 million for positive train control because the federal government did not provide funding when it mandated the control system.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wetter. Warmer. Wilder. That long-term weather forecast for the Philadelphia region means trouble for SEPTA, especially on its railroad, subway, and trolley routes. A federal report released this month, which used SEPTA as a case study for the nation's transit systems, predicts that average temperatures in Philadelphia will rise by 3 to 6 degrees by 2050, with greater annual rainfall and more frequent "heavy precipitation events. " That means SEPTA can expect more flooding, sagging rail-power lines, mudslides, toppled trees, and washed-out rail beds.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boosted by an improving economy and lower gasoline prices, travel is increasing on U.S. highways and transit systems, although individual American drivers appear to be driving fewer miles than they used to. The rebound in vehicle traffic in 2014 followed six years of declining or stagnant numbers, attributed to tough economic times and changing driving habits. Mass transit ridership also grew last year, continuing a decades-long trend. Transportation patterns are being closely watched by policymakers and federal legislators as they debate ways to pay for highway and transit construction and maintenance.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA managers and Regional Rail workers differed sharply Tuesday on the possible safety effects if SEPTA is permitted to avoid requirements of a federal rule designed to limit fatigue. SEPTA wants the Federal Railroad Administration to renew a waiver that the transit agency has had from the work rule for two years. At an FRA public hearing in Delaware County on Tuesday, engineers and conductors argued that a waiver would endanger passengers by forcing train crews to work with too little rest.
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