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NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA has reached a tentative labor agreement with the union that represents about 215 Regional Rail electrical workers, officials for the transit agency said Wednesday. The tentative deal must be ratified by the members of IBEW Local 744 and approved by SEPTA's board of directors. No deal has been reached with Regional Rail locomotive engineers, however, so the possibility of a commuter rail strike remains. Engineers could strike as early as Oct. 12, and the tentative deal "doesn't affect our negotiations," said Stephen Bruno, vice president of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | By Richard Burke, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Councilwoman Happy Fernandez is asking SEPTA to reopen hearings on its recently announced service cutbacks, saying the transit authority is trying to eliminate some lines in secret. In a letter to SEPTA general manager Louis J. Gambaccini, Fernandez said the proposed cuts "fly in the face of common sense" and deserve closer scrutiny. She said SEPTA's presentation in public hearings earlier this month on proposed cutbacks in the Regional Rail division "did not clearly inform me and other concerned citizens on the extent of these additional cuts.
NEWS
April 2, 2003 | By Jere Downs INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Facing a projected $55 million deficit created in part by state budget-cutting, SEPTA announced a plan yesterday to raise fares and severely reduce service, including discontinuing four Regional Rail lines and shutting down or merging dozens of bus routes. An estimated 50,000 passengers - 12 percent of the transit agency's 430,000 daily riders - would be affected by the service cutbacks, set for October. "This is big; this is bad," SEPTA general manager Faye Moore said before a news conference.
NEWS
December 11, 2009 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The SEPTA board yesterday approved the contract that ended last month's six-day strike by bus drivers, subway and trolley operators and mechanics. The board's approval clears the way for SEPTA to distribute $1,250 "signing bonus" checks to each of the 5,100 workers represented by Transport Workers Union Local 234. The five-year contract provides a 2.5 percent raise in its second year, and a 3 percent raise in each of the final three years. It increases workers' contributions to the pension fund from the current 2 percent to 3 percent, and it increases the maximum pension to $30,000 a year from the current $27,000 a year.
NEWS
March 17, 2006 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SEPTA's board is expected to approve a $244 million contract next week for a Korean-Japanese consortium to build at least 104 regional rail cars over the next four years. A staff recommendation that SEPTA accept the bid by United Transit Systems was made public yesterday. The contract would be the largest investment SEPTA has ever made in regional rail vehicles, and would increase its fleet by 31 cars. The rest of the new Silverliner V cars would replace 73 aging rail cars that date to the 1960s.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Sen. Stewart J. Greenleaf (R., Montgomery) said yesterday that he would introduce a bill paving the way for state funding of a proposed SEPTA rail line that would link economic centers and residential communities in three suburban counties. Greenleaf said his bill would place the proposed rail line - commonly known as the Cross County Metro - on the Capital Budget Authorization Bill, making it eligible for funding. He said he would introduce the legislation today or tomorrow.
NEWS
March 20, 2004 | By Jere Downs and Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
SEPTA abruptly canceled its quarter-billion-dollar purchase of new Regional Rail cars yesterday in order to end a lawsuit that accused the transit agency of rigging the bid to favor a South Korean firm. In a written statement released yesterday, SEPTA board chairman Pasquale "Pat" Deon said the potential legal costs prompted him to end the suit and put the contract out to bid again. SEPTA expects quickly to invite new bids for the contract to build 104 new cars for the Regional Rail system, the statement said.
NEWS
October 17, 1997 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A national strike by Amtrak employees, threatened for as early as Wednesday, could disrupt the daily commute for nearly 25,000 riders on SEPTA's regional rail system. Six of SEPTA's 13 regional rail lines, representing the bulk of passengers on the commuter rail system, run on Amtrak tracks, and depend on Amtrak to provide power, signaling and switching. The other seven regional rail lines would continue operating in case of an Amtrak strike but could be overwhelmed by thousands of additional riders.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | By Rosland Briggs and Ambre Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Richard Jones contributed to this story
When a strike shut down SEPTA buses, trolleys and subways last week, commuters walked, carpooled and relied on the regional rail system to get around. When the trains stopped running yesterday, transit riders rose to the challenge again. Picketing transit workers shut down service on seven of SEPTA's 17 regional rail lines. SEPTA canceled most service on the R1 Airport line, R2 Wilmington, and the R7 and R8 lines into Chestnut Hill and Fox Chase, the R6 Cynwyd Line and the R7 Trenton.
NEWS
July 6, 2006 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Less than a year after a weeklong strike stilled buses, subways and trolleys, SEPTA once again faces the threat of a shutdown - this time, regional commuter trains. The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen (BLET), whose 195 local members run SEPTA regional-rail trains, have worked without a contract for almost a year. Union leaders and SEPTA are at odds over wages. In November, the transit authority gave its largest union - Transport Workers Union Local 234 - a four-year deal with annual 3 percent raises.
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