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Regional Rail

NEWS
June 9, 1998 | By Rosland Briggs and Ambre Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Richard Jones contributed to this story
When a strike shut down SEPTA buses, trolleys and subways last week, commuters walked, carpooled and relied on the regional rail system to get around. When the trains stopped running yesterday, transit riders rose to the challenge again. Picketing transit workers shut down service on seven of SEPTA's 17 regional rail lines. SEPTA canceled most service on the R1 Airport line, R2 Wilmington, and the R7 and R8 lines into Chestnut Hill and Fox Chase, the R6 Cynwyd Line and the R7 Trenton.
NEWS
July 6, 2006 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Less than a year after a weeklong strike stilled buses, subways and trolleys, SEPTA once again faces the threat of a shutdown - this time, regional commuter trains. The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen (BLET), whose 195 local members run SEPTA regional-rail trains, have worked without a contract for almost a year. Union leaders and SEPTA are at odds over wages. In November, the transit authority gave its largest union - Transport Workers Union Local 234 - a four-year deal with annual 3 percent raises.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ask Ed Wilkes about the future of transportation in the suburbs and he'll tell you to look at Route 202 during rush hour. The outlook isn't pretty, he said, particularly if SEPTA eliminates its weekend service and some off-peak weekday service on its regional rail lines, as it has proposed. "People will get back in their cars," said Wilkes, chairman of the Upper Merion Board of Supervisors and a SEPTA commuter for 17 years. And he wasn't buoyed by what he heard at the authority's hearing at the Valley Forge Hilton in King of Prussia on Tuesday night, the second in a series of five meetings the authority held on its proposed cuts to the regional rail lines.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's long-delayed, $130-million smart-card payment system will be called SEPTA Key, the agency announced Thursday. Like Ben Franklin's key. Get it? But unlike Franklin's kite experiment, no lightning speed is involved with SEPTA's move away from tokens, passes and tickets. The first new subway turnstiles are in place, but widespread use of the card on subways and buses won't happen till next year, and on Regional Rail, not until 2016 at least. The new system will allow riders to use any "contactless" credit card or a SEPTA-issued card or even a smartphone to pay their fares at card-reading turnstiles or bus fare boxes.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | BY PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com 215-854-5914
FIRST, there's a thump. Then - lightning fast - a crunch. The inhuman sound erupted moments after Richard Dixon jerked the emergency brake on the train he was operating. Right away, he knew what it was - the sound of a body being crushed beneath his train. It was a 17-year-old boy. "It's really hard to describe," the engineer said, recalling the suicide that unfolded a decade ago as his Regional Rail train barreled north from Jenkintown toward Warminster. "You just know it - and you don't forget it. " For 15 people, trains speeding along the city's railroads have been a gruesome, but easily accessible, means of killing themselves over the past five years.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A SEPTA worker involved in a fatal 2009 Regional Rail accident is fighting a federal effort to disqualify him from safety-sensitive rail work until 2019. Vance Almond, 57, of South Philadelphia, contends he is being made a scapegoat in the death of rail inspector Kevin Sparks, who was hit and killed by a West Trenton train on Nov. 5, 2009, during a transit strike. About 8:30 a.m. that day, Train 327 was coming out of a curve at 65 m.p.h., traveling south on tracks usually used by northbound trains, just south of the Melrose Park station, federal accident investigators found.
NEWS
October 19, 2004
Highlights of SEPTA plan to be discussed at a public hearing today: Raising the base cash fare from $2 to $2.50 and increasing the average price of all other SEPTA fares by 25 percent. Reducing weekday service on all city and suburban routes, including regional rail, by 20 percent. Suspending weekend service on all city and suburban, regional rail and paratransit routes Eliminating approximately 1,400 SEPTA employee positions in response to reduced levels of service.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com
A woman died after being hit by a SEPTA regional rail train near the Hatboro Station in Montgomery County about 8 Tuesday night. The woman's age and identity were not disclosed Tuesday night, however, officials said she may have been suicidal. Police in Hatboro were investigating the incident, but could not comment Tuesday night. Rail service on the Warminster regional rail line was suspended just after the accident, with trains beginning and terminating at the Willow Grove station.
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's fare structure does not discriminate against City Transit passengers so more affluent suburban commuters can ride the railroad for less, according to a decision by the federal appeals court in Philadelphia. The Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in a split decision handed down Wednesday, ruled that SEPTA's fare structure was not discriminatory, but a "legitimate business" decision to offset decreasing ridership on its Regional Rail line. The 2-1 decision upholds a ruling last year by U.S. District Judge Daniel H. Huyett 3d, who at the time described the suit, filed by the Committee for a Better North Philadelphia, as "nothing more (than)
NEWS
November 16, 2002 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A power outage knocked out service to all of SEPTA's regional commuter trains for about 2 1/2 hours yesterday, stranding thousands of riders during the evening rush. SEPTA said the failure occurred about 5:45 p.m. at a distribution center at Wayne Junction in North Philadelphia that services the entire Regional Rail network. Transit agency spokesman Richard Maloney said the failure was an example of "Murphy's law" at work. Some trains ended up being stuck between stations at a time of high volume, he said.
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