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Regressive Tax

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NEWS
January 13, 1986
As President Reagan would say, "There you go again. " In a Jan. 5 editorial, you called for a tax on domestic and imported oil. The American voters flatly rejected tax increases in the last presidential election. Disguising a tax hike within the falling price of oil doesn't make it any less a tax. Forgetting, for the moment, that additional taxes were rejected, why do you propose a regressive tax that hits poor people the hardest? Energy is not a luxury; it is a basic necessity for the rich and poor alike.
NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's soda tax battle has gone full-on presidential. Following comments former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made in Philadelphia Wednesday in support of Mayor Kenney's a proposed tax on sugary drinks to universal fund pre-K education, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders said Thursday he's against the tax. "At a time of massive income and wealth inequality, it should be the people on top who see an increase in their taxes, not low-income and...
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Delaware County women have filed suit in Delaware County Court seeking to overturn collection of the county's personal property tax, claiming it is unconstitutional. Helen Hamilton of Lansdowne and Helen Lippman of Media also seek a refund of collected taxes back to 1989 and class-action status for their suit. The tax is a 4-mill levy on stocks and bonds. Their suit is similar to one recently filed in Montgomery County. Lawyer John M. Gallagher Jr., who represents Hamilton and Lippman, is also the attorney for the Montgomery County plaintiffs.
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | By Juan F. Ramos
Last month, I presented a resolution in Philadelphia City Council honoring the memory of Cesar E. Chavez, founder of the United Farm Workers. His grandson Paul came from California to accept this honor. Chavez believed that the strongest act of humanity is to sacrifice ourselves for others. He believed that the toughest things were worth it because they had to be done. He always said "Si, se puede," which translates to "Yes, it can be done. " This simple imperative was the great moral heart of his politics - the politics of a God-fearing, God-loving man. In the spirit of Chavez, champion of migrants and other workers, I am proud to cosponsor a bill by Councilman David Cohen that would modify Philadelphia's wage and net profit tax to substantially reduce wage tax burdens on the working poor.
NEWS
May 6, 1996 | BY MICHAEL BUSLER
Gov. Ridge has suggested raising the tax on gasoline from 22.5 cents to 28.5 cents per gallon in order to pay for highway repairs. He apparently feels the tax should be levied in proportion to a taxpayer's use of the highways. This can be determined (or at least estimated) by the number of gallons of gasoline a consumer purchases. This seems fair, but is it? There are three basic classifications for taxes: progressive, regressive and proportional. Progressive taxes are ones in which the tax rate (not just the tax dollars)
NEWS
April 11, 2002
THE MAYOR is defending our wage tax - the most indefensible anti-poor, anti-development, anti-growth component of our city economy - by warning that any serious tax-cutting threatens neighborhood services and uniformed personnel. The mayor may have hired a PR agent to appear more open to the public, but his eyes are still firmly shut on this issue. This regressive tax is also the single greatest disincentive for growth in the Philadelphia economy. But go ahead, Mayor Street, keep the wage tax!
NEWS
April 30, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Clinton playing politics with city taxpayers Hillary Clinton's support of Mayor Kenney's regressive 3-cents-an-ounce sugary-drinks tax is misguided ("Clinton, Cruz bring campaigns to Pa.," April 21). We sincerely doubt that she was made aware of the significant loss of family-sustaining jobs that will result if this outrageous tax is passed. Similarly, Clinton likely has no idea that the projected revenues from the tax will never come to fruition due to the precipitous decline in sales of sugar-sweetened drinks that will occur and the underground markets that will arise if the tax proposal becomes law. Keep in mind that Kenney endorsed Clinton for president.
NEWS
December 16, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - A Republican state senator unveiled a plan Monday to replenish New Jersey's near-depleted transportation fund without raising the tax on gasoline. Sen. Jennifer Beck (R., Monmouth) said a combination of economic growth based on conservative revenue projections, scaling back public employees' health benefits as Gov. Christie has called for, and increasing fines on motor vehicle violations such as texting while driving would help provide $1.6 billion annually for seven years to the Transportation Trust Fund.
NEWS
November 15, 2005
On staying the course It's upsetting to see the polls for the Iraq War dropping so fast. With 2,000 Americans dead, we are losing our will to fight. Some people served when it was their turn, studied Iraq and said it was worth any sacrifice to change the regime there, and there is honor in that. Others studied history, decided this war was about profits and SUVs and went on the streets to protest before the first American died, and that is what democracy is about. But why were so many Americans comfortable sending 2,000 troops to their deaths, waving flags and yellow ribbons, but now say to come home with our tail between our legs?
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
SOMEBODY SHOOK up the soda can and it exploded in Mayor Kenney's face. On Saturday, the Inquirer reported a major flaw in the soda tax requested by Mayor Kenney: The tax on fountain drinks, which had never been mentioned, was 4.5 cents an ounce, 50 percent higher than the 3 cents-per-ounce tax he had been talking about. Ooops. (Author's warning: Many numbers ahead.) The soda tax was to pay for several desirable programs, such as universal prekindergarten and upgrading parks and rec centers, on Kenney's to-do list.
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NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown on Thursday plans to introduce a tax on beverage containers as an alternative to Mayor Kenney's proposed tax on sugary drinks. Containers would be taxed at a rate of 15 cents each, a source familiar with Reynolds Brown's proposal said. The councilwoman's office on Wednesday confirmed that she would introduce the "container tax," which has been levied elsewhere on products ranging from beer to bottled water. It did not say what rate she was seeking, or provide a list of products that would be affected, but said the tax would bring in at least $64 million annually.
NEWS
April 30, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Clinton playing politics with city taxpayers Hillary Clinton's support of Mayor Kenney's regressive 3-cents-an-ounce sugary-drinks tax is misguided ("Clinton, Cruz bring campaigns to Pa.," April 21). We sincerely doubt that she was made aware of the significant loss of family-sustaining jobs that will result if this outrageous tax is passed. Similarly, Clinton likely has no idea that the projected revenues from the tax will never come to fruition due to the precipitous decline in sales of sugar-sweetened drinks that will occur and the underground markets that will arise if the tax proposal becomes law. Keep in mind that Kenney endorsed Clinton for president.
NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's soda tax battle has gone full-on presidential. Following comments former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made in Philadelphia Wednesday in support of Mayor Kenney's a proposed tax on sugary drinks to universal fund pre-K education, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders said Thursday he's against the tax. "At a time of massive income and wealth inequality, it should be the people on top who see an increase in their taxes, not low-income and...
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
SOMEBODY SHOOK up the soda can and it exploded in Mayor Kenney's face. On Saturday, the Inquirer reported a major flaw in the soda tax requested by Mayor Kenney: The tax on fountain drinks, which had never been mentioned, was 4.5 cents an ounce, 50 percent higher than the 3 cents-per-ounce tax he had been talking about. Ooops. (Author's warning: Many numbers ahead.) The soda tax was to pay for several desirable programs, such as universal prekindergarten and upgrading parks and rec centers, on Kenney's to-do list.
NEWS
December 16, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - A Republican state senator unveiled a plan Monday to replenish New Jersey's near-depleted transportation fund without raising the tax on gasoline. Sen. Jennifer Beck (R., Monmouth) said a combination of economic growth based on conservative revenue projections, scaling back public employees' health benefits as Gov. Christie has called for, and increasing fines on motor vehicle violations such as texting while driving would help provide $1.6 billion annually for seven years to the Transportation Trust Fund.
NEWS
November 17, 2015
THERE WAS A SENSE of relief last week when Gov. Wolf and Republican legislative leaders announced a tentative agreement on a new state budget. Our first reaction was, better late than never. The state had gone five months without the ability to spend because of the stalemate in Harrisburg, forcing school districts to borrow money to keep operating and social-service agencies to furlough workers. Details about the deal are hard to come by because it is not completely worked out, though the governor has said he is hopeful a budget bill can be signed before Thanksgiving.
NEWS
March 4, 2013
Can't put a price on internships Far from being exploitive, our law firm's internship program has provided valuable training and real-world experience that no college education can provide. Furthermore, far from keeping people unemployed, our internship program has helped push many Philadelphians into positions they otherwise would not have been qualified for, helping them and the local economy as their income increases ("Wanted: Talented, driven. Pay: $0," Feb. 24). There may be plenty of subpar internships out there, just as there are plenty of subpar jobs.
NEWS
January 15, 2009 | By Daniel R. Reynolds
This year will mark the fifth anniversary of Pennsylvania's gaming law, originally conceived as a way of protecting the state's horse-racing industry. Neighboring states such as Delaware and West Virginia had instituted slot-machine gaming to boost purses at their racetracks. But the bill's initial intent got hijacked at some point. Signed by Gov. Rendell in July 2004, the bill was sold not as horse-racing protectionism, but as a tax-relief vehicle. Revenue from gaming, it was said, could be used to trim property taxes.
NEWS
January 12, 2007
Some may be happy about slots arrival By what litmus test does Steve Zettler (letter, Jan. 4) unequivocally state that "virtually the entire citizenry does not want slots parlors anywhere ever"? I know many people of modest means who enjoy playing slots with no expectation of retiring on their winnings. They enjoy the thrill of small-time gambling for the price of two tickets to see the Eagles or a Broadway show. Why should anyone assume those who play slots are poor, uneducated people who know no better?
BUSINESS
December 5, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Persuading the city's leadership to eliminate the business-privilege tax will be the top priority of the Philadelphia Bar Association's incoming chancellor, employment lawyer Jane L. Dalton. Dalton is an avid list-maker who writes down the books she wants to read and movies she wants to see. She has started a new list - of her Bar Association priorities. They include promoting judicial independence and boosting participation among the group's 13,000 members. "We want to encourage people to become more involved," said Dalton, of Philadelphia, the first woman partner at Center City law firm Duane Morris L.L.P.
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