CollectionsRegressive Tax
IN THE NEWS

Regressive Tax

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 13, 1986
As President Reagan would say, "There you go again. " In a Jan. 5 editorial, you called for a tax on domestic and imported oil. The American voters flatly rejected tax increases in the last presidential election. Disguising a tax hike within the falling price of oil doesn't make it any less a tax. Forgetting, for the moment, that additional taxes were rejected, why do you propose a regressive tax that hits poor people the hardest? Energy is not a luxury; it is a basic necessity for the rich and poor alike.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Delaware County women have filed suit in Delaware County Court seeking to overturn collection of the county's personal property tax, claiming it is unconstitutional. Helen Hamilton of Lansdowne and Helen Lippman of Media also seek a refund of collected taxes back to 1989 and class-action status for their suit. The tax is a 4-mill levy on stocks and bonds. Their suit is similar to one recently filed in Montgomery County. Lawyer John M. Gallagher Jr., who represents Hamilton and Lippman, is also the attorney for the Montgomery County plaintiffs.
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | By Juan F. Ramos
Last month, I presented a resolution in Philadelphia City Council honoring the memory of Cesar E. Chavez, founder of the United Farm Workers. His grandson Paul came from California to accept this honor. Chavez believed that the strongest act of humanity is to sacrifice ourselves for others. He believed that the toughest things were worth it because they had to be done. He always said "Si, se puede," which translates to "Yes, it can be done. " This simple imperative was the great moral heart of his politics - the politics of a God-fearing, God-loving man. In the spirit of Chavez, champion of migrants and other workers, I am proud to cosponsor a bill by Councilman David Cohen that would modify Philadelphia's wage and net profit tax to substantially reduce wage tax burdens on the working poor.
NEWS
May 6, 1996 | BY MICHAEL BUSLER
Gov. Ridge has suggested raising the tax on gasoline from 22.5 cents to 28.5 cents per gallon in order to pay for highway repairs. He apparently feels the tax should be levied in proportion to a taxpayer's use of the highways. This can be determined (or at least estimated) by the number of gallons of gasoline a consumer purchases. This seems fair, but is it? There are three basic classifications for taxes: progressive, regressive and proportional. Progressive taxes are ones in which the tax rate (not just the tax dollars)
NEWS
April 11, 2002
THE MAYOR is defending our wage tax - the most indefensible anti-poor, anti-development, anti-growth component of our city economy - by warning that any serious tax-cutting threatens neighborhood services and uniformed personnel. The mayor may have hired a PR agent to appear more open to the public, but his eyes are still firmly shut on this issue. This regressive tax is also the single greatest disincentive for growth in the Philadelphia economy. But go ahead, Mayor Street, keep the wage tax!
NEWS
November 15, 2005
On staying the course It's upsetting to see the polls for the Iraq War dropping so fast. With 2,000 Americans dead, we are losing our will to fight. Some people served when it was their turn, studied Iraq and said it was worth any sacrifice to change the regime there, and there is honor in that. Others studied history, decided this war was about profits and SUVs and went on the streets to protest before the first American died, and that is what democracy is about. But why were so many Americans comfortable sending 2,000 troops to their deaths, waving flags and yellow ribbons, but now say to come home with our tail between our legs?
NEWS
March 5, 1995
The suspicion rises that Gov. Whitman is moving ahead in national political circles by moving her state's tax policies backward. Backward, as in shifting the emphasis from a graduated income tax, one of the fairest of taxes, to property taxes, one of the least fair. An Inquirer analysis published last Sunday showed that property tax collections in New Jersey were up 5 percent in 1994, slightly outstripping the savings taxpayers got from Gov. Whitman's first round of income tax cuts.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
Money is tight. The economy and the real estate market are in a slump, and people just aren't buying many washing machines, dryers and other appliances. Now, Steve Lehman, the owner of Carl Lehman and Son appliance store in the Northeast, says he has to worry about losing business to his suburban competitors because of Philadelphia's new 1 percent sales tax. "We all just have to say it's another nail in the coffin of the sidewalk merchant," said Lehman, whose 54-year-old business at 6611 Rising Sun Ave. is minutes away from Montgomery and Bucks counties.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 4, 2013
Can't put a price on internships Far from being exploitive, our law firm's internship program has provided valuable training and real-world experience that no college education can provide. Furthermore, far from keeping people unemployed, our internship program has helped push many Philadelphians into positions they otherwise would not have been qualified for, helping them and the local economy as their income increases ("Wanted: Talented, driven. Pay: $0," Feb. 24). There may be plenty of subpar internships out there, just as there are plenty of subpar jobs.
NEWS
January 15, 2009 | By Daniel R. Reynolds
This year will mark the fifth anniversary of Pennsylvania's gaming law, originally conceived as a way of protecting the state's horse-racing industry. Neighboring states such as Delaware and West Virginia had instituted slot-machine gaming to boost purses at their racetracks. But the bill's initial intent got hijacked at some point. Signed by Gov. Rendell in July 2004, the bill was sold not as horse-racing protectionism, but as a tax-relief vehicle. Revenue from gaming, it was said, could be used to trim property taxes.
NEWS
January 12, 2007
Some may be happy about slots arrival By what litmus test does Steve Zettler (letter, Jan. 4) unequivocally state that "virtually the entire citizenry does not want slots parlors anywhere ever"? I know many people of modest means who enjoy playing slots with no expectation of retiring on their winnings. They enjoy the thrill of small-time gambling for the price of two tickets to see the Eagles or a Broadway show. Why should anyone assume those who play slots are poor, uneducated people who know no better?
BUSINESS
December 5, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Persuading the city's leadership to eliminate the business-privilege tax will be the top priority of the Philadelphia Bar Association's incoming chancellor, employment lawyer Jane L. Dalton. Dalton is an avid list-maker who writes down the books she wants to read and movies she wants to see. She has started a new list - of her Bar Association priorities. They include promoting judicial independence and boosting participation among the group's 13,000 members. "We want to encourage people to become more involved," said Dalton, of Philadelphia, the first woman partner at Center City law firm Duane Morris L.L.P.
NEWS
August 3, 2006
Re the "True blues" food column by Marilynn Marter (June 29): We eat and drink color! In my experience in the food industry, taste is one of the important qualities in evaluating food, but how the food looks is equally important. The art of cooking and the act of eating require all five senses: taste, sight, touch, smell and sound. Try cooking with an artist's point of view. I once prepared a lunch that included no fewer than a dozen fruits and vegetables. The juicy red watermelon paired with the yellow tomatoes and delicate purple slivers of red onion tasted as refreshing as they looked.
NEWS
September 23, 2005 | By ELMER SMITH
CASINO critics like to claim that state-supported gambling levies a regressive tax on the poor. Seems the poor spend more "disposable" income on the slot pulls, scratch offs and shell games that more and more states have come to rely on. In short, they are more susceptible to the lure of flashing lights and spinning cylinders than the better-heeled among us. As a result, social scientists tell us, the poor sacrifice much more for the greater...
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | By Juan F. Ramos
Last month, I presented a resolution in Philadelphia City Council honoring the memory of Cesar E. Chavez, founder of the United Farm Workers. His grandson Paul came from California to accept this honor. Chavez believed that the strongest act of humanity is to sacrifice ourselves for others. He believed that the toughest things were worth it because they had to be done. He always said "Si, se puede," which translates to "Yes, it can be done. " This simple imperative was the great moral heart of his politics - the politics of a God-fearing, God-loving man. In the spirit of Chavez, champion of migrants and other workers, I am proud to cosponsor a bill by Councilman David Cohen that would modify Philadelphia's wage and net profit tax to substantially reduce wage tax burdens on the working poor.
NEWS
May 8, 2003 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The perennial discontent over property taxes and politicians' perennial resistance to assuaging taxpayers' concerns is spurring a push to have voters take responsibility for a solution. An Assembly committee is scheduled to consider today a constitutional convention to deal solely with the property-tax issue. "We're not going to do it ourselves," said Sen. John Adler (D., Camden). "Both parties are too skittish to do it. " If both houses of the legislature approved the measure and the governor signed it, voters would be asked in November whether they favored the constitutional convention.
NEWS
April 23, 2002 | By Carl Golden
The effort to convene a constitutional convention to reform New Jersey's tax structure and end what many consider to be an overreliance on the local property tax is badly misplaced. It is, in effect, an indictment of past legislatures and governors - and presumably the current administration - for lacking the courage or political will to address the issue effectively, if at all. Save the taxpayers' money; forget the convention. The legislature can solve the problem tomorrow by doing what everyone involved knows must be done: Raise either of the state's two broad-based taxes - sales or income.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|